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Saturday, 04 Apr 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linus Torvalds Questions The Not So Glorious Driver For That Funky Looking RGB Mouse

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Last month I noted a new Linux driver for a buggy and funky looking mouse. A special driver was created by a community developer due to not all the mice button working otherwise due to not abiding by HID specifications. Now that the driver was merged for Linux 5.7, Linus Torvalds had words to share on this open-source driver.

The hid-glorious driver is a basic HID Linux driver needed for PC Gaming Race's Glorious mice of at least some different models. Their HID behavior is not following spec resulting in some mouse buttons not working. This isn't some knock-off super cheap mouse either but the Glorious Model O for instance retails for $50 USD.

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Embedded Linux joins the Covid-19 battle

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Embedded Linux is combating the coronavirus in thermal imaging devices such as the Kogniz’ Health Cam and a Raspberry Pi based FluSense device that analyzes coughs. We also look at open source ventilator projects and products from Aaeon, Advantech, and Seeed.

AI surveillance devices that use facial recognition and other technologies to identify and track people give us the creeps and make us wonder about the future of civil liberties. But you know what else gives us the creeps? The novel coronavirus. In recent weeks we’ve heard about a variety of embedded Linux devices that are being put to work scanning people for thermal signatures that might suggest a high fever.

Below, we examine some thermal imaging technologies for detecting Covid-19 that are confirmed to run Linux, including Kogniz’ Jetson Xavier based Health Cam and a Raspberry Pi based FluSense device that incorporates a Myriad X accelerator and a ReSpeaker mic array for detecting coughs. But first we’ll take a brief tour of some other Covid-19 related projects and products that involve Linux, open source, or embedded tech in general.

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Games: Atari VCS, Proton and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Atari VCS is in trouble again as Rob Wyatt sues Atari for lack of payment

    Rob Wyatt, the architect behind the original Xbox and someone Atari hired to work on the Atari VCS system is now suing Atari over their failure to actually pay up.

    This is something we mentioned last year, when it was announced that Wyatt left Atari on poor terms, mentiong how they hadn't actually payed for over six months and they were left with no choice but to leave the project. Since then, we've not heard much. Atari continued putting out their development blog posts, showing off pictures of units in production in China and delaying the release. Spotted by VentureBeat and confirmed here, Tin Giant (Rob Wyatt's company), are now suing Atari over a "Breach of Contract". According to the suit, Atari owes something around $261,720 which is no small sum.

  • Hypnotic puzzle-adventure 'Path to Mnemosyne' looks wild and it's now on Linux

    Path to Mnemosyne from DevilishGames originally released back in 2018, going on to receive some quite positive reviews about the setting and visuals and now it's on Linux. It does look incredibly trippy, and they say the "infinite zoom" feature makes it quite unique.

  • Humble Choice has a new bundle up for April with a bonus game if you subscribe

    Humble Choice, the monthly game bundle subscription has a fresh selection ready for April and they're giving out a bonus game to people who subscribe. This is the tiered subscription that gives you the ability to pick a certain amount of games based on whatever level you sub at.

  • FROGSONG is a sweet looking frog adventure where it's okay to be small

    Ready for an adventure of a different sort? FROGSONG looks really quite sweet, an action adventure where you're an actual frog hopping around in a world 'where it's okay to be small'.

  • Valve and CodeWeavers now offering test builds of Proton before release with Proton 5.0-6 RC1 up

    Looks like Valve and CodeWeavers are switching up how Proton is released, with a series of test builds now being provided before a new stable release in the hopes of seeing less issues.

    Looking to get started with Steam Play on Linux? Have no idea what it is? Be sure to check our previous beginners guide for some tips and explanations. We'll be keeping that up to date with any major changes.

    Today, Wine hacker and CodeWeavers developer Andrew Eikum announced the release of Proton 5.0-6 RC1 on the Proton GitHub page. Keep in mind these new builds haven't had the usual quality assurance as the main Proton releases, however it's a good chance for more people to test before they go live for everyone on Steam.

  • Proton 5.0-6 To Allow Out-Of-The-Box DOOM Eternal On Linux

    Valve is finishing up work on Proton 5.0-6 as the next version of their Wine downstream that powers Steam Play. With Proton 5.0-6 are some promising improvements.

    Most notably, Proton 5.0-6 will allow DOOM Eternal to run out-of-the-box under Steam Play on Linux. This Windows game was recently released and has been seeing improvements for its Wine-based Linux support. There have also been driver optimizations already by NVIDIA's Vulkan driver as well as RADV improvements too for some hardware with this latest game in the DOOM franchise. Now with Proton 5.0-6 should be a pleasant out-of-the-box experience after fixing some DRM failures. The latest Vulkan drivers are still a must.

  • More Switch games

    Sonic Mania is a really lovely homage to the classic 90s Sonic the Hedgehog platform games. Featuring more or less the classic gameplay, and expanded versions of the original levels, with lots of secrets, surprises and easter eggs for fans of the original. On my recommendation a friend of mine bought it for her daughter's birthday recently but her daughter will now have to prise her mum off it! Currently on sale at 30% off (£11.19). The one complaint I have about it is the lack of females in the roster of 5 playable characters.

  • Why Nullpomino is the only acceptable open-source Tetris

    Note: acceptable from the perspective of a Tetris fanatic who regularly uses jargon like SRS, lock delay, DAS, ARR, etc. For the casual player, these games are perfectly fine. Albeit, I would recommend Quadrapassel over KBlocks to casuals because of the better rotation.

Better than Zoom: Try these free software tools for staying in touch

Filed under
Web

In times like these it becomes all the more important to remember that tools like Zoom, Slack, and Facebook Messenger are not benign public services, and while the sentiment they've expressed to the global community in responding to the crisis may be sincere, it hasn't addressed the fundamental ethical issues with any piece of proprietary software.

After taking the LibrePlanet 2020 conference online, we received a number of requests asking us to document our streaming setup. As the pandemic grew worse, this gave way to more curiosity about how the Free Software Foundation (FSF) uses free tools and free communication platforms to conduct our everyday business. And while the stereotype of hackers hunched over a white on black terminal session applies to us in some ways, many of the tools we use are available in any environment, even for people who do not have a lot of technical experience. We've started documenting ethical solutions on the LibrePlanet wiki, in addition to starting a remote communication mailing list to help each other advocate for their use.

In the suggestions that follow, a few of the tools we will recommend depend upon some "self-reliance," that is, steering clear of proprietary network services by hosting free software solutions yourself, or asking a technical friend to do it for you. It's a difficult step, and the benefits may not be immediately obvious, but it's a key part of preserving your autonomy in an age of ubiquitous digital control.

To those who have the technical expertise and available infrastructure, we urge you to consider hosting instances of free communication platforms for your friends, family, and your community at large. For example, with a modest server and some GNU/Linux knowledge, you could help local students learn in freedom by volunteering to administer an instance of one of the programs we'll be recommending below.

The need to self-host can be an uncomfortable reminder of our dependence on the "cloud" -- the network of someone else's computers -- but acknowledging our current reliance on these providers is the first step in making new, dependable systems for ourselves. During dangerous and stressful times, it's tempting to sideline our ethical commitments for easier or more convenient ways to get things done, and software freedom is no exception. We hope these suggestions will inspire you to inform others about the importance of their freedom, privacy, and security.

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LMDE4: How Much Does Debian Matter?

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
Debian

LMDE4 works as intended. It is a more polished release overall than last year's version 3. It proves the developer's experimental intent. Linux Mint certainly can carry on with relatively minor changes should there ever be a parting of ways over the continued use of the Ubuntu Linux base.

What could make LMDE a better proposition going forward? Adding more diversification with a choice of MATE and Xfce desktops.

That would put the Debian-based Linux Mint variant on a more equal footing. In turn, the additional options could create interest in a Debian Linux-based alternative for potential new Linux Mint users who do not want the Cinnamon desktop.

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Compact, Linux-based computer extends I/O of networked systems

Filed under
Linux

Aitech’s compact, rugged “A174” computer can extend the I/O of multiple network-connected computers. The avionics focused A174 runs Linux on a Cyclone V SoC and provides I/O including serial, analog, discrete, ARINC-429, and more.

Aitech’s FPGA-enabled A174 I/O expansion subsystem is designed as a companion computer for one or more avionics computers, but it can be used with any rugged embedded system to extend I/O and offload I/O processing. The system’s multiple-client/multiple-server architecture enables multiple A174 devices to act as I/O servers to multiple clients.

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The 15 Best Cinnamon Themes for Linux System in 2020

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint is an excellent community-driven Linux distro based on Ubuntu. It is very popular among beginners because Linux Mint is very easy to use. Though it has Debian in its core, the user interface is quite modern and beautiful. It is mostly because of its default desktop environment Cinnamon. This open-source desktop environment can be used on other Linux distributions. Cinnamon is almost similar to Xfce and GNOME 2 because of its conservative design model. But since its release in 2011, it has got huge coverage because of its ease-of-use. The active developer community of Cinnamon is relentlessly developing amazing Cinnamon themes for the mass users. These Linux Mint themes can change your desktop and create such a gorgeous look.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • QQ for Linux 2.0 Beta2 Released with Stability Improvements

    QQ for Linux, the popular instant messaging apps developed by Tencent, released the second Beta on April Fools’ Day.

    The development of QQ on Linux is quite slow. It has been 5 months since the last release.

  • LibreOffice's extension Formatting of All Math Formulas 0.1.9 is released

    We have updated our extension Formatting of All Math Formulas to 0.1.9 version.
    The extension allows you to change font and font size for all (or only for selected) Math formulas in your Writer, Calc, Draw or Impress document for one time.

  • Foundation is now close to Catalina compatibility

    I have worked hard to get it to this point, but all of the classes in Catalina are now present in GNUstep's base implementation. Soon, all of the classes available in AppKit will also be available in GNUstep's GUI implementation.

  • Bassel Khartabil Fellowship Awarded to Tarek Loubani—Using Open Access to Combat COVID-19

    The Fellowship award will allow Loubani to Combat COVID-19 through the release of Open Access plans for medical hardware, so that vital equipment may be produced cheaply by anyone with commonly available 3D printers. Loubani’s approach enables high quality devices to be made available during periods of global supply chain disruption, and in areas with limited access. Glia has released face shields already being used in the battle against COVID-19, as well as other hardware including stethoscopes, tourniquets, and otoscopes. Additional devices including pulse oximeters, electrocardiograms, and dialysis products are currently in development. See the full press release for more information about Loubani’s work and how the fellowship will support his efforts.

  • Code Search for Google open source projects

    We are pleased to launch Code Search for Google open source projects. Code Search is one of Google’s most popular internal tools, and now we have a version (same binary, different flags) targeted to open source communities.

    Googlers use Code Search every day to help understand the codebase: they search for half-remembered functions and usages; jump through the codebase to figure out what calls the function they are viewing; and try to identify when and why a particular line of code changed.

    The Code Search tool gives a rich code browsing experience. For example, the blame button shows which user last changed each line and you can display history on the same page as the file contents. In addition, it supports a powerful search language and, for some repositories, cross-references.

  • Google Opens Code Search For Angular, Dart, TensorFlow And More

    Google has announced the launch of Code Search for its popular open source projects — Angular, Bazel, Dart, ExoPlayer, Firebase SDK, Flutter, Go, gVisor, Kythe, Nomulus, Outline, and Tensorflow.

  • The Linux Foundation to Award 500 Training Scholarships
  • OpenDaylight Magnesium Advances Open Source Software Defined Networking

    On March 31, the OpenDaylight Magnesium release became generally available marking the 12th release of the open source Software Defined Networking (SDN) controller platform. The OpenDaylight project was officially announced in April 2013 with a long list of marquee sponsor all focused on the goal of creating an open source SDN controller. OpenDaylight has two releases in any given year, with Magnesium following up the Sodium and Neon releases from 2019.

    As is often the case, there are updates to existing projects as well as the addition of new projects in the Magnesium release. OpenDaylight is a platform that is comprised of multiple modular component project that users can choose to mix and match in different configurations as needed.

  • Strange Times: During The COVID-19 Outbreak, Evictions Get A Pause...In Final Fantasy 14

    As the world navigates the reality of the COVID-19 worldwide pandemic, we've already noted several ways that the outbreak has changed our daily lives. Me being me, I noticed just how many professional sports organizations were moving into broadcast versions of their eSports as a way to fill the void. That of course isn't the only way video game life has changed.

  • Cellar Door Games have officially announced Rogue Legacy 2

    Rogue Legacy 2 from Cellar Door Games is a "genealogical" rogue-lite following the popular gameplay idea from the original, where you die and pass on your skills and continue to grow through new characters.

    While there's currently no platforms mentioned for release since they've only just begun teasing it (there's not even a trailer yet), it's likely it will come to Linux since both the original Rogue Legacy and Cellar Door's other title Full Metal Furies were on Linux and they were ported by Ethan Lee.

  • X-Plane 11.50 has a first Beta with Vulkan API support which should improve performance

    X-Plane 11 is a very highly rated flight simulation game and Laminar Research have been working on advancing the graphics side of it, with a first Beta out for the next version with Vulkan support.

    Announced on their official blog yesterday, Laminar mentioned that had 50+ third-party developers do plenty of private testing for them but as this is the first public Beta it will likely have some issues. For the Linux version any Linux distribution that can run recent GPU drivers should be fine, with any somewhat recent GPU that supports Vulkan. On the NVIDIA side you need at least driver version 440.26 but Mesa version for AMD was not mentioned (Intel seems not supported).

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Split String in Python

    When a string of multiple words is divided into the specific number of words based on a particular separator then it is called string splitting. Most of the programming languages use the split() method to divide a string into multiple words. The return type of this method is an array for many standard programming languages. the split() method is used in Python also to divide a string into words and it returns a list of words based on the separator. How to split() method can be used in Python is shown in this article by using different examples. Spyder3 editor is used here to write and execute the python script.

  • Send and receive UDP packets via Python

    We already know about two main transport layer protocols like TCP and UDP. For more information about TCP and UDP you can check reference section. In this article we will learn how to send and receive UDP packets using python program.

  • The 7 most popular ways to plot data in Python

    "How do I make plots in Python?" used to have a simple answer: Matplotlib was the only way. Nowadays, Python is the language of data science, and there's a lot more choice. What should you use?

    This guide will help you decide. It will show you how to use each of the four most popular Python plotting libraries—Matplotlib, Seaborn, Plotly, and Bokeh—plus a couple of great up-and-comers to consider: Altair, with its expressive API, and Pygal, with its beautiful SVG output. I'll also look at the very convenient plotting API provided by pandas.

    For each library, I've included source code snippets, as well as a full web-based example using Anvil, our platform for building web apps with nothing but Python. Let's take a look.

  • Episode 3: Effective Python and Python at Google Scale

    In this episode, Christopher interviews Brett Slatkin about the 2nd edition of his book Effective Python. Brett talks about the revisions he made for the book, and updating it for the newest versions of Python 3.

    Christopher asks who is the intended developer for the book. Brett also discusses working on Google App Engine, and what it’s like to develop and maintain Python applications at Google Scale. Brett mentions a brief anecdote about working with Guido van Rossum, while they both worked at Google. He also provides advice about maintaining a large and aging Python code base.

  • Randy Zwitch: Building pyarrow with CUDA support

    The other day I was looking to read an Arrow buffer on GPU using Python, but as far as I could tell, none of the provided pyarrow packages on conda or pip are built with CUDA support. Like many of the packages in the compiled-C-wrapped-by-Python ecosystem, Apache Arrow is thoroughly documented, but the number of permutations of how you could choose to build pyarrow with CUDA support quickly becomes overwhelming.

    In this post, I’ll show how to build pyarrow with CUDA support on Ubuntu using Docker and virtualenv. These directions are approximately the same as the official Apache Arrow docs, just that I explain them step-by-step and show only the single build toolchain I used.

  • Python String Formatting

    The string Formatting is a very important task of any type of programming language. It helps the user to understand the output of the script properly. The string formatting can be done in Python in various ways, such as using ‘%’ symbol, format() method, string interpolation, etc. This article shows how the string data can be formatted in Python by using different string formatting methods. Spyder3 editor is used here to write and run the script.

    Two types of formatting parameters can be used in Python. These are positional parameters and keyword parameters. The parameter which is accessed by the index is called the positional parameter and the parameter which is accessed by key is called the keyword parameter. The uses of these parameters are shown in the next part of this article.

  • 30 Days Of Python | Day 3 Project: A Simple Earnings Calculator

    Welcome to the first mini project in the 30 Days of Python series. For this project we're going to be creating a simple console application that will help an employer calculate an employee's earning in a given week.

    [...]

    Once you've written your program, you shouldn't be worried if it looks a little bit different to ours. You might have chosen different variable names or prompts, or you might have used a slightly different approach to us. This is absolutely fine. There are often may different ways to write even very short programs like this.

  • When to use the Clean Architecture?

    There are few possible reactions after learning about the Clean Architecture or Hexagonal Architecture (AKA Ports & Adapters) or even merely innocent service layer in Django. Some developers are enthusiastic and try to apply these techniques immediately, some are hesitant, full of doubts. The rest is strongly opposing, declaring openly this is an abomination. Then they say we already have excellent tools, like Django. Then they argue others don’t know about the advanced features of common tools. Then they call you Java developer in disguise.

    As a speaker and an author of the book Implementing the Clean Architecture , I have faced all the reactions from this spectrum. What two extremes fail to do, is to ask the right question – WHEN? When the Clean Architecture should be used?

New Manjaro Linux ARM 20.04 Released For Single Board Computers

Filed under
Linux

With the successful shipment of Manjaro Linux ARM to Pinebook Pro, the Manjaro ARM team has released a new ARM v20.4 for single board computers. The latest version is a successor to the previous ARM 20.02 with major system changes. Manjaro ARM is an Arch and Manjaro Linux-based small distribution by a developer team from Manjaro Linux. The ARM edition is a dedicated operating system for devices using ARM architecture-based processors.

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Events: openSUSE, LibreOffice, Curl and GNOME SCaLE 18x

Filed under
OSS
  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 96

    While many activities around the world slow down due to the COVID-19 crisis, we are proud to say the YaST development keeps going at full speed. To prove that, we bring you another report about what the YaST Team has been working on during the last couple of weeks.

    The releases of openSUSE Leap 15.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP2 are approaching. That implies we invest quite some time fixing bugs found by the testers.

  • Indonesian LibreOffice community: Online translation marathon

    Communities around the world help to translate and localise LibreOffice in over 100 languages. We really appreciate their efforts!

  • Update on openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference

    Organizers of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference had a meeting this week to discuss various topics surrounding COVID19 and how it may affect the conference and planning for it.

    At this point, it is uncertain what restrictions governments may keep in place in the coming months. While October is some months away, there are many aspects we are considering as to how to run the openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference.

    Travel restrictions, flights, hotel and venue availability, event capacity and our community members’ ability to attend the conference are all factors we are considering. We hope to make a decision about the conference at the latest by mid-June.

  • Daniel Stenberg: The curl roadmap 2020 video

    On March 26th 2020, I did a live webinar where I talked about my roadmap visions of what to work on in curl during 2020.

  • Molly de Blanc: SCaLE 18x

    The GNOME presence was felt throughout the conference with a special GNOME Beers and pre-release party on the first day of the conference, Thursday, March 5th. GNOME information flyers were also included inside every attendee bag.

    This presence carried on to our booth where we were able to connect with GNOME community members, contributors, and enthusiasts as well as tote our merchandise, including a brand new GNOME t-shirt, and stickers. Thank you to the number of supporters who assisted us at the booth including Foundation staff, Melissa Wu, Caroline Henriksen, Neil McGovern, and Rosanna Yuen, along with Foundation members Matthias Clasen, Sriram Ramkrishna, and Nuritzi Sanchez.

Ubuntu 20.04 Beta is Now Available to Download

Filed under
Ubuntu

Landing in advance of next month’s stable release, the Ubuntu 20.04 beta gives enthusiasts and testers the chance to get up close with the various changes on offer.

Such as?

Well, Ubuntu 20.04 beta ships the Linux 5.4 kernel; offers the majority of the recent GNOME 3.36 release, including its new lock screen; and adds a new ‘dark mode’ setting to the Appearance section.

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IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • What’s new with tzdata: The time zone database for Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    The Time Zone Database (tzdata) provides Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) with data that is specific to the local time zone. Applications in the Linux operating system use this data for various purposes. For instance, the GNU C Library (glibc) uses tzdata to ensure APIs such as strftime() work correctly, while applications such as /usr/bin/date use it to print the local date.

    The tzdata package contains data files documenting both current and historic transitions for various time zones around the world. This data represents changes required by local government bodies or by time zone boundary changes, as well as changes to coordinated universal time (UTC) offsets and daylight saving time (DST).

  • JetBrains IntelliJ Red Hat OpenShift extension provides debug support for OpenShift components

    The 0.2.0 release version of the Red Hat OpenShift extension for JetBrains IntelliJ is now available. You can download the OpenShift Connector extension from the JetBrains Plugins Repository. This release provides a new OpenShift: Debug action to simplify the debugging of OpenShift Components pushed to a cluster. It is similar to features developed for Visual Studio Code and JBoss Tools for Eclipse. OpenShift Connector uses OpenShift Do‘s (odo‘s) debug command under the hood and supports only local Java and Node.js components. This enhancement lets the user write and debug local code without leaving IntelliJ.

  • IBM awards its second $50,000 Open Source Community Grant to internship and mentorship program Outreachy

    Last October, the open source community at IBM awarded a first-of-its-kind quarterly grant to promote nonprofits that are dedicated to education, inclusiveness, and skill-building for women, underrepresented minorities, and underserved communities in the open source world. Our Open Source Community Grant identifies and rewards future developers and open source leaders and creates new tech opportunities for underrepresented communities.

    Today, we are pleased to announce that the winner of the second quarterly Open Source Community Grant is Outreachy. Our open source community nominated a number of nonprofits doing incredible work and, while voting was close with plenty of deserving organizations in the mix, we awarded Outreachy the most votes for their commitment to providing paid internships to underserved and underrepresented minorities. The award is timely as it will help Outreachy provide paid remote work to underrepresented groups in a time when people are being forced to work from home because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Red Hat OpenShift Serverless Inches Closer to GA

    Red Hat recently updated its OpenShift Serverless platform with a handful of new features that inch it closer to general availability (GA). The move highlights both the ongoing maturation of serverless platforms as well as the tepid pace of that maturation process.

    Red Hat’s OpenShift Serverless product is based on the Knative project. It boasts many of the benefits tied to serverless platforms like the ability to scale up or down to zero, which theoretically allows for lower operational costs. And OpenShift is Red Hat’s Kubernetes-focused enterprise platform.

    The update uses the Knative 0.12 iterations of serving, eventing, and the Knative command line interface (CLI). That’s just a few steps behind the most recent Knative releases that are part of the project’s rapid-fire release cycle. It also includes a handful of other integrations designed to ease use and integration.

  • Red Hat: We need to talk about cloud-native

    As they edge towards a 5G architecture, can the network operator community build on key takeaways from their early virtualization efforts? Susan James, senior director of telecommunications strategy at Red Hat, sure as hell hopes so.

    "The telcos need to look at what has been learned from the NFV years," says James, adding pointedly, "there's no point in just dumping applications into containers."

    And that could be the temptation as the telecom sector starts to embrace the cloud-native aspects of 5G and all that encompasses, from new ways of building, onboarding, integrating, managing, exposing and supporting applications, whether developed in-house or sourced from third-party developers.

    Telcos have been talking about cloud-native for a few years, since they realized that somewhat monolithic virtualized network functions (VNFs) running on early NFV infrastructure platforms would only get them a smidge of the agility and flexibility they seek. Instead, a wide-area-network-friendly, carrier-grade version of the containerized systems increasingly popular with large enterprises and the data center brigade looks far better suited for the challenges that full-blown 5G (with its gazillions of potentially latency-intolerant devices connected to edge platforms) will bring.

    Now those conversations about containers, Kubernetes and next-generation telco cloud functionality are getting more frequent, says James, who has been with Red Hat – one of the leading providers of open source software systems for telco cloud deployments, such as its version of OpenStack and its OpenShift container platform – for almost two years, following more than 15 years at Ericsson.

  • Let’s monitor edge computing networks with RHEL!

    One of the characteristics of edge computing is that rather than one big network, multiple smaller networks are being used. Network connectivity inside of these smaller networks is mostly reliable, but the connectivity between these network bubbles can be unstable—some edge network concepts are even designed to cope with temporary network interruptions between these networks.

  • Ansible streaming video series, open source security tools, and more industry trends

    As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.

Elisa Music Player by KDE is Refreshing, But Not There Just Yet

Filed under
KDE
Software
Reviews

If you’re someone who still listens to locally stored music, in this day and age of several streaming music services, you deserve a good music player app. I use Google Play Music because it also lets me upload my local music files. Yet, I can never really fully switch over because I just don’t like the silly-looking interface. Google Play Music just has the worst interface of all music streaming services. Thus, I still prefer using a nice, beautiful local music player app more often when I can. As such, I’m always on the lookout. Elisa Music Player was just released by the KDE team and is kind of available for every Windows, openSUSE, and Arch Linux user.

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KDE: Debian's Builds of KDE/Plasma, Krita Report and KDE on Instagram

Filed under
KDE
  • Norbert Preining: KDE/Plasma updates for Debian sid/testing

    I have written before about getting updated packages for KDE/Plasma on Debian. In the meantime I have moved all package building to the openSUSE Build Service, thus I am able to provide builds for Debian/testing, both i386 and amd64 architectures.

  • [Krita's] April Development Update

    With near infinite difficulty we managed to release Krita 4.2.9 in the last week of March… So now it’s time to look ahead! All Krita developers work from home anyway, whether they do sponsored work or are volunteers, but it’s quite hard to keep focus these days. Several of us are in quarantine, others are in lock-down — with people in Hong Kong, China, India, Russia, Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, U.S.A, Canada, Mexico and Brazil we live under a wide variety of pandemic responses. The Libre Graphics Meeting in Rennes has been moved to 2021, as has the Krita Developers Sprint that was going to happen right after LGM.

    But life goes on, and we’re on the verge of another edition of Google Summer of Code. Krita has received a bunch of excellent proposals! Let’s keep our fingers crossed for our prospective students!

    And, of course, a lot is happening in Krita’s repository! About two weeks ago we merged the resource management rewrite branch into master. Now, let’s unpack this in what we’ve been doing, and what this means… For the past five years, we’ve been working on rewriting the way Krita handles things like brush presets, brush tip and tags. This turned out to be a huge amount of work, sucking up lots and lots of energy. But in March we felt we could risk merging everything into master so it would get into the development builds.

  • KDE on Instagram

    Instagram is one of those social medium services and is run by everyone’s favourite Facebook. The good side of it is that it’s based on happy pretty pictures rather than angry people (Twitter) or political disinformation (Facebook) but the bad side of that is it is common to feel inferior because you’re not as good looking as the people in the pictures. Well that’s not a problem because everyone using KDE or helping out the community is automatically good looking.

Rant of the day: well, at least Microsoft is making loads of money...

Filed under
Server
Microsoft

Sadly, many if not most of our schools today are suddenly pumping lots of extra money into Microsoft, Zoom and other proprietary software companies, because they need online collaboration. We all know there are many alternatives to giving their students' data away to foreign companies but most don't bother. It is annoying, there is always budget for Microsoft, but not for proper, local, privacy-protecting open source solutions, even if those are better. Why is that?

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Mesa, Nano, Redis, Git Update in openSUSE Tumbleweed

Another four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week. A notable package updated this week is a new major version of (gucharmap)[https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Gucharmap]. Plus several python package updates, nano, mesa, git and Xfce packages also had new minor updates. The most recent snapshot, 202000331 is trending well with a stable rating of 99 on the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. The GNOME Character Map, gucharmap, updated to version 13.0.0, but no changelog was provided. An update for glib2 2.62.6 is expected to be the final release of the stable 2.62.x series; maintenance efforts will be shifted to the newer 2.64.x series. The updated glib2 package fixed SOCKS5 username/password authentication. The 2.34 binutils package added and removed a few patches. GTK3 3.24.16 fixed problems with clipboard handling and fixed a crash in the Wayland input method. The package for creating business diagrams, kdiagram 2.6.2 fixed printing issue. The Linux Kernel updated to 5.5.13. A handful of Advanced Linux Sound Architecture changes were made in the kernel update. The 5.6.x kernel is expected to be released in a Tumbleweed snapshot soon. The libstorage-ng 4.2.71 package simplified combining disks with different block sizes into RAID. The programming language vala 0.46.7 made verious improvements and bug fixes and properly set CodeNode.error when reporting an error. Several xfce4 packages were updated and xfce4-pulseaudio-plugin 0.4.3 fixed various memory leaks and warnings and xterm 353 was updated. The yast2-firewall 4.2.4 packaged was updated and forces a reset of the firewalld API instance after modifying the service state and yast2-storage-ng 4.2.104 extended and improved the Application Programming Interface to get udev names for a block device The package to improve audio and video under Linux pipewire 0.3.1 switched the license to MIT and added fdupes BuildRequires and pass fdupes macro while removing duplicate files, which came in snapshot 20200326. The 1.1.9 spec-cleaner package drop travis and tox and now uses github actions. Several python arrived in this snapshot. Python-packaging 20.3 fixed a bug that caused a 32-bit OS that runs on a 64-bit ARM CPU (e.g. ARM-v8, aarch64), to report the wrong bitness and python-SQLAlchemy 1.3.15 fixed regression in 1.3.14. The Xfce file manager package, thunar 1.8.14 updated translations and reverted a bug that introduced a regression. The snapshot recorded a stable rating of 99. Read more [Post apparently removed[ Also: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/14

Sparky 5.11

A quarterly update point release of live/install media of Sparky 5.11 “Nibiru” of the stable line is out. This is a release based on Debian 10 “Buster”. Changes: – the base system upgraded from Debian stable repos as of March 1, 2020 – Linux kernel 4.19.98 LTS (PC) – Linux kernel 4.19.97 LTS (ARMHF) – added 9 new nature wallpapers captured by Aneta, Pavbaranov and me – Sparky repository changed to the named “nibiru” (“stable” works as before); no need to manually change the repo; see also: https://sparkylinux.org/sparky-named-repos/ – Firefox 68.6.0 ESR – Thunderbird 68.6.0 – LibreOffice 6.1.5 Read more

Steam Survey Points To Tiny Uptick In Linux Percentage For March

With the Steam Survey numbers out this week, the March 2020 statistics point to the Linux gaming marketshare ticking up by 0.04% to 0.87%. But in reality that is almost a rounding error and sticks to what we have largely been seeing in recent months of 0.8~0.9% for Linux gaming on Steam. Though even with the record number of users on Steam in March, it's good to see the Linux percentage didn't actually diminish -- at least according to the survey numbers. Read more

Python Programming

  • Analysis of the progress of COVID-19 in the world with Data Science.

    All the data in this article was made with Data Scientis tools. Given the circumstances the planet is experiencing at the moment, we show below a series of results after implementing Data Science techniques to monitor the virus. For the following analyzes, the data from the Johns repositories were taken Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering (JHU CSSE). As it is public knowledge, the advance of the pandemic is a worldwidede concer, that is why I consider interesting to be able to make an analysis of certain countries. Therefore we can see in the following graph how the curve of confirmed infected persons in countries such as USA, Italy, France and Argentina advances from the beginning to today.

  • Introduction to the Python HTTP header

    You can create your own custom headers for the HTTP destination using the Python HTTP header plugin of syslog-ng and Python scripts. The included example configuration just adds a simple counter to the headers but with a bit of coding you can resolve authentication problems or fine tune how data is handled at cloud-based logging and SIEM platforms, like Sumologic.

  • Announcing a new Sponsorship Program for Python Packaging

    The Packaging Working Group of the Python Software Foundation is launching an all-new sponsorship program to sustain and improve Python's packaging ecosystem. Funds raised through this program will go directly towards improving the tools that your company uses every day and sustaining the continued operation of the Python Package Index.

  • Python String Concatenation

    String concatenation means creating a new string by combining two or more string values. Many built-in methods and ‘+’ operator are used to combine string values in many programming languages. ‘+’ operator is also used in python to combine string values but it works differently than other scripting languages. In JavaScript, when a string value combines with the number value then the number value will convert automatically into the string and combines with the other string value. But if you do the same task in Python then it will generate an error because Python can’t convert the number into string automatically. Many other ways exist in Python to combine string values. This article shows how you can do string concatenation in Python in different ways. Here, spyder3 editor is used for writing and executing the scripts of this article.

  • Python String Replacement using Pattern

    Any string data can be replaced with another string in Python by using the replace() method. But if you want to replace any part of the string by matching a specific pattern then you have to use a regular expression. It is used to search a specific pattern in a particular string value and the string will be replaced with another string if any match found. Python uses ‘re’ module to use regular expression pattern in the script for searching or matching or replacing. Using regular expression patterns for string replacement is a little bit slower than normal replace() method but many complicated searches and replace can be done easily by using the pattern. You can replace a string in various ways using the pattern in Python. Some common uses of pattern to replace string are shown in this tutorial. Spyder3 editor is used here to write and run the script.

  • Python String startswith and endswith

    Sometimes we need to check the starting or the ending part of any string for the programming purpose. There are two built-in methods in Python to do the task. These are startswith() and endswith() methods. If any string starts with a given prefix then startswith() method will return true otherwise returns false and if any string ending with a given suffix then endswith() method will return true otherwise returns false. How these methods work and use in Python are shown in this tutorial. Spyder3 editor is used here to write and run the python script.

  • Examples are Awesome

    There are two things I look for whenever I check out an Opensource project or library that I want to use. 1. Screenshots (A picture is worth a thousand words). 2. Examples (Don't tell me what to do, show me how to do it). Having a fully working example (or many examples) helps me shape my thought process.

  • App Assisted Contact Tracing

    I don't know how I thought the world would look like 10 years ago, but a pandemic that prevents us from going outside was not what I was picturing. It's about three weeks now that I and my family are spending at home in Austria instead of going to work or having the kids at daycare, two of those weeks were under mandatory social distancing because of SARS-CoV-2. And as cute as social distancing and “flattening the curve” sounds at first, the consequences to our daily lives are beyond anything I could have imagined would happen in my lifetime. What is still conveniently forgotten is that the curve really only stays flat if we're doing this for a very, very long time. And quite frankly, I'm not sure for how long our society will be able to do this. Even just closing restaurants is costing tens of thousands of jobs and closing schools is going to set back the lives of many children growing up. Many people are currently separated from their loved ones with no easy way to get to them because international travel grinded to a halt.