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Thursday, 21 Jan 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Devices: Xtra-PC, Arduino and Inventor Coding Kit Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2021 - 9:10pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2021 - 9:04pm
Story Audiocasts/Shows: Blender 2.91, Server Security, Linux in the Ham Shack and More Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2021 - 8:58pm
Story IBM/Red Hat Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2021 - 8:43pm
Story Improved Battery Reporting For Newer Logitech Devices Coming To Linux 5.12 Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2021 - 8:39pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2021 - 8:19pm
Story 3 Helpful Networking Projects for Your Raspberry Pi Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2021 - 8:14pm
Story GNU Radio 3.9.0.0 released Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2021 - 7:21pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2021 - 6:56pm
Story KDE: On KDE e.V., OSM, and SoK Roy Schestowitz 1 18/01/2021 - 6:29pm

Xfce 4.16 Desktop Lands in openSUSE Tumbleweed, Download Now

Filed under
SUSE

If you’ve been waiting for Xfce 4.16 to land in openSUSE Tumbleweed, I have some good news today as the wait is over and you can install the desktop environment right now from distribution’s software repositories and upgrade from Xfce 4.14.

Xfce 4.16 brings many goodies for fans of the lightweight desktop environment, including fractional scaling, dark mode for the Panel, CSD (Client-side decorations) support for all the Settings dialogs, a revamped About Xfce dialog with info about CPU, GPU and RAM, as well as a refreshed look with new icons and color palette.

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Carbon Player – desktop media player

Filed under
Software

My favorite pastime is to see an eclectic range of bands, solo artists, and orchestras live. It’s such a life-changing and exhilarating experience to be present. It’s one thing to be sitting at home listening to a CD or watching music videos on TV or on YouTube, but being with an audience, packed out in a stadium or music hall, takes it to another level. But it’s an expensive pastime, and still on hold given the current coronavirus pandemic. I’m therefore listening to music from my CD collection which I’ve encoded to FLAC, a lossless audio format, and stored locally.

Linux offers a huge array of open source music players. And many of them are high quality. I’ve reviewed the vast majority for LinuxLinks, but I’m endeavoring to explore every free music player in case there’s an undiscovered gem.

Carbon Player is a cross-platform media player written in JavaScript and uses Electron, an open-source software framework developed and maintained by GitHub. Let’s see how Carbon Player fares.

Read more

Games: Bomber Crew, Going Green and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Get a free copy of Bomber Crew during the Humble Winter Sale

    How about a free game for the coming weekend? Humble Store has Bomber Crew going free during their new Winter Sale so you can pick up some other cheap games too. Bomber Crew is a really highly rated and enjoyable game too, so it's a pretty good pick to get free!

    As for the new Humble Winter Sale, it's a big one with lots of publishers big and small joining in. Plus there's of course masses of fantastic indie games that deserve plenty of attention. If you want to look over what the bigger lot have take a look at the sales for SEGA, 2K, Deep Silver, Humble Games, Codemasters, THQ Nordic, Kalypso Media and also Team17 have an existing sale still on.

  • Prison Architect: Going Green announced for release on January 28

    Paradox Interactive and Double Eleven have announced the next expansion and free update for Prison Architect with the Prison Architect: Going Green DLC launching on January 28.

    Seems like bit of a theme with Paradox published games. We had the Cities: Skylines - Green Cities DLC in 2017, the Surviving Mars: Green Planet DLC in 2019 and now prisons are going green too. You will be able to create a more environmentally friendly prison with farming and all sorts.

  • 【Xonotic】Let The Mayhem Commence Again

    I had a lot of fun in the last Xonotic stream we did so I thought I'd be fun to try that again, I tried to test out my server with other people on it and it seems like it's working this time but we'll truly see when the open source arena shooter mayhem begins

  • The State of Virtual Reality on Linux

    …Until after some life changes, an unexpected influx of money, and curious about all the news about Half-Life next installment (Alyx) and Valve’s own VR system, the Valve Index, and the claims that it is supported on Linux, I took the plunge and bought it. I got it on my house on April 30, 2020, an exact year after its debut.

    What happened to me next was extraordinary. I met new worlds, I felt new things, I traveled to many places in the hardest months of the Lock-downs. It is not easy to describe, since it is so linked to the senses, so real and at the same time so abstract. In this article, I’ll try to laboriously describe what I felt — without ever leaving Linux — and give numerous examples. For that, though, I have to start with boring stuff. Stay with me and you won’t regret.

    So. This article will try to convey how Virtual Reality on Linux became viable, what are its challenges and limitations, which applications and games run on it, what are the terms and technologies associated to it and what to expect from the future. And also give a light whether it’s worth investing on this technology today, instead of waiting for it to mature as most people must think.

  • Valve Is Planning Something Special For Linux Gaming In 2021

    Before we get to that carrot Valve is dangling in front of us for 2021, let’s begin with a sobering observation. Despite two straight years of incredible advancements in Linux gaming — specifically Proton, the compatibility layer that lets us easily run thousands of Windows games on Linux — there has been a negligible increase in Linux gaming adoption. As marketing-centric scribe James Mawson so poignantly states, it’s a “growth so feeble, it’s difficult to separate from statistical noise; Linux isn’t even a serious threat to the Mac in this space.”

    Wow. Sobering indeed.

    Clearly We Have Work To Do

    Proton 5 now ships with the Steam for Linux client, and it introduces improved performance, support for DX12 and much more. As Valve’s informative 2020 recap points out, an increase in developers testing their games against Proton (without needing to invest huge time and resources into developing native ports) resulted in some big AAA titles like Death Stranding, Cyberpunk 2077 and others being playable on Linux at or shortly after their native Windows releases.

    That’s wonderful for gamers already immersed in the Linux gaming ecosystem, but let’s be honest with ourselves and admit that there are still many reasons to dual-boot Windows. Maybe it’s the lure of popular games that rely on anti-cheat software or invasive DRM. Maybe it’s the subpar support for brand new hardware like the Radeon RX 6000 GPUs.

  • Axiom Verge gets a first ever free update six years later with the Randomizer Mode

    While work continues on the sequel, Axiom Verge has a first ever free content update following the release back in 2015 with a new Randomizer Mode. Never played Axiom Verge? You're missing out. A true love-letter to the classic metroidvanias!

    This brand new update is currently in Beta, requiring you on Steam to opt into it in the usual way. Right click the game, go to Properties and hit Betas on the left panel and find it there. As the name of the update might suggest, it makes things a bit more random but "in a very sophisticated way". This mode is smart enough so you won't get stuck because of needing a certain item to progress onwards.

    How did it come about so long after release? Thanks to the speedrunning community, along with a developer of a mod that gave players an unofficial version of this but it needed a copy of the game. They teamed up to add it into the base game with the modder refusing any compensation for it. How nice for all of us!

  • Stockholm to host the 2021 CS:GO Major, with the biggest ever prize pool

    Valve along with PGL have announced the return of Counter-Strike: Global Offensive's next Major Championship that will take place this year in Sweden.

    Not only has competitive esport CS:GO returned, it's coming back with a bang too. This will be the biggest single prize pool in CS:GO history with twenty four teams competing for 2 million dollars USD. Not only that, this will also be the first event that is broadcast live in 4K resolution. The main event will be during November 4-7, so they're leaving enough time to hopefully see COVID-19 get a little more under control as this will be an in-person event with a live audience.

Mozilla: Rust, Socorro, and 'Healthier' Internet (Openwashing)

Filed under
Development
Moz/FF
Web
  • Another Rust-y OS: Theseus joins Redox in pursuit of safer, more resilient systems

    Rust, a modern system programming language focused on performance, safety and concurrency, seems an ideal choice for creating a new operating system, and several such projects already exist. Now there is a new one, Theseus, described by creator Kevin Boos as "an Experiment in Operating System Structure and State Management."

    The key thinking behind Theseus is to avoid what Boos and three other contributors from Rice and Yale universities call "state spill".

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 373
  • Socorro Engineering: Half in Review 2020 h2 and 2020 retrospective

    2020h1 was rough. 2020h2 was also rough: more layoffs, 2 re-orgs, Covid-19.

    I (and Socorro and Tecken) got re-orged into the Data Org. Data Org manages the Telemetry ingestion pipeline as well as all the things related to it. There's a lot of overlap between Socorro and Telemetry and being in the Data Org might help reduce that overlap and ease maintenance.

    [...]

    2020 sucked. At the end, I was feeling completely demoralized and deflated.

  • Reimagine Open: Building a Healthier Internet

    Does the “openness” that made the [Internet] so successful also inevitably lead to harms online? Is an open [Internet] inherently a haven for illegal speech, for eroding privacy and security, or for inequitable access? Is “open” still a useful concept as we chart a future path for the [Internet]?

    A new paper from Mozilla seeks to answer these questions. Reimagine Open: Building Better Internet Experiences explores the evolution of the open [Internet] and the challenges it faces today. The report catalogs findings from a year-long project of outreach led by Mozilla’s Chairwoman and CEO, Mitchell Baker. Its conclusion: We need not break faith with the values embedded in the open [Internet]. But we do need to return to the original conceptions of openness, now eroded online. And we do need to reimagine the open [Internet], to address today’s need for accountability and online health.

Kernel: Linux 5.11, TuxMake, Linux 5.12, and NVIDIA "Nouveau" Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • 5.11 Merge window, part 2

    Linus Torvalds released the 5.11-rc1 prepatch and closed the 5.11 merge window on December 27. By that time, 12,498 non-merge changesets had been pulled into the mainline; nearly 2,500 of those wandered in after the first merge-window summary was written. Activity slowed down in the second week, as expected, but there were still a number of interesting features that found their way into the mainline.

  • Portable and reproducible kernel builds with TuxMake

    TuxMake is an open-source project from Linaro that began in May 2020 and is designed to make building Linux kernels easier. It provides a command-line interface and a Python library, along with a full set of curated portable build environments distributed as container images. With TuxMake, a developer can build any supported combination of target architecture, toolchain, kernel configuration, and make targets.

    Building a Linux kernel is not difficult. Follow the documentation, install the dependencies, and run a couple of make commands. However, if a developer wants to build for multiple architectures, with multiple toolchains, things get complicated quickly. Most developers and maintainers have a set of custom scripts that they have written and maintained to perform their required set of builds. TuxMake provides a common layer of abstraction to reduce the need for every developer to write their own build scripts.

    TuxMake publishes containers for various toolchain/architecture combinations. These containers eliminate the need for individual developers to source and install multiple toolchains and toolchain versions on their systems. It also makes builds reproducible and portable because now the environment in which a kernel is built is versioned and shareable across the internet and on mailing lists.

    TuxMake has two goals. First, remove the friction that may cause developers, especially new developers, to skip build testing for uncommon toolchain/architecture combinations. Second, to make it easier for builds and build problems to be described and reproduced.

  • Linux 5.12 To Allow Disabling Intel Graphics Security Mitigations - Phoronix

    The Linux 5.12 kernel will allow optional, run-time disabling of Intel graphics driver security mitigations, which so far is just in regards to last year's iGPU Leak vulnerability. This i915.mitigations= module parameter control is being added as part of finally fixing the Haswell GT1 graphics support that was fallout from this mitigaion.

    The drm-intel-gt-next pull request to DRM-Next for Linux 5.12 was sent in. Most notable is that fixing of the Haswell GT1 support that came from the clear residual security mitigations. Since that iGPU Leak mitigation for Gen7/Gen7.5 graphics was merged last year, Haswell GT1 graphics have resulted in hangs at boot. That's finally fixed up. Besides being in Linux 5.12, it should also get back-ported to recent stable kernel series as well.

  • Open-Source "Nouveau" Driver Now Supports NVIDIA Ampere - But Without 3D Acceleration - Phoronix

    Patches were sent out today that provide the open-source Linux kernel "Nouveau" driver with support for NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 series "Ampere" graphics cards. But at the moment there is no 3D acceleration and the developers are blocked still by signed firmware requirements, so it's basically just a matter of having kernel mode-setting display support.

    Red Hat's Ben Skeggs sent out the pull request today that provides kernel mode-setting support for the RTX 30 "Ampere" graphics cards with the long-standing open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver

Daniel Stenberg: Food on the table while giving away code

Filed under
Software

I founded the curl project early 1998 but had already then been working on the code since November 1996. The source code was always open, free and available to the world. The term “open source” actually wasn’t even coined until early 1998, just weeks before curl was born.

In the beginning of course, the first few years or so, this project wasn’t seen or discovered by many and just grew slowly and silently in a dusty corner of the Internet.

Already when I shipped the first versions I wanted the code to be open and freely available. For years I had seen the cool free software put out the in the world by others and I wanted to my work to help build this communal treasure trove.

Read more

Also: GStreamer 1.18.3 stable bug fix release

What my Linux adventure is teaching me about our possible future

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I am a Linux ambassador of sorts. I’ve been using the Linux computer operating system since 2013. I can still remember the light feeling I had the day I broke free of the Microsoft Windows operating system.

No more constant worries about viruses hijacking or corrupting my computer. No more outlays to pay for each upgrade. No more worries that the next upgrade will be really lousy and buggy and remain so for months or even years. And, above all, no more freezes in the middle of my work and work lost as a result.

Now eight years into my Linux adventure I am wildly satisfied with that choice. That remains the case even though my most recent upgrade did not go as planned and got stretched out over several days. But this latest upgrade has made me think hard about why I stick with Linux and what the Linux way of doing things can tell us about a possible, better future.

I think some of the principles and structures I’m seeing are found in practically every pursuit, agriculture, education, the arts, politics, and commerce. If you are growing some of your own food, you are practicing these principles and creating similar structures. If you are teaching outside existing educational systems, you are likely doing the same. If you are writing, painting, singing, dancing or somehow expressing yourself artistically, you are probably already moving toward the world that the Linux community is pioneering in its own corner. If you created a business not only to have a livelihood, but because you want to change the world, you are almost certainly on the same path.

Let me explain a little about Linux, and then try to relate that to the broader world.

First, I tell people who decide to try Linux that they are not merely loading a piece of software on their computer; they are joining a community. This is a very important distinction.

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Also: Behind the Scenes of System76: Customer Happiness Team

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

5 reasons why you should develop a Linux container strategy

Filed under
Linux
Server

Containerization has gained in popularity over the past few years. However, the subject still remains elusive for some. There are many different opinions revolving around this architectural paradigm, spanning from "containers are just a way to obfuscate bad code" to "you are a dinosaur if your entire infrastructure isn't already containerized."

If you have one of these strong opinions, this post probably is not for you. The following is for those who have not had the time nor bandwidth to research the topic and are not sure how the architecture might help within their organization. In this article, I give a simple explanation of some of the advantages of adopting a container strategy within your infrastructure and give you some quick and simple tips to get started. There are, in fact, many advantages of containerization within your infrastructure, both from a technical perspective and the development lifecycle perspective.

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How open source builds distributed trust

Filed under
OSS

This is an edited excerpt from my forthcoming book on Trust in Computing and the Cloud for Wiley and leads on from a previous article I wrote called Trust & choosing open source.

In that article, I asked the question: What are we doing when we say, "I trust open source software"? In reply, I suggested that what we are doing is making a determination that enough of the people who have written and tested it have similar requirements to mine, and that their expertise, combined, is such that the risk to my using the software is acceptable. I also introduced the idea of distributed trust.

The concept of distributing trust across a community is an application of the wisdom of the crowd theory posited by Aristotle, where the assumption is that the opinions of many typically show more wisdom than the opinion of one or a few. While demonstrably false in its simplest form in some situations—the most obvious example being examples of popular support for totalitarian regimes—this principle can provide a very effective mechanism for establishing certain information.

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tomboy-ng – Simple Note-Taking Application for Desktops

Filed under
Linux
OSS

tomboy-ng is a free and open-source note-taking application for Linux, Mac, and Windows desktops. It is built with simplicity in mind which makes it easy to use for organizing different ideas and managing notes using typical note-taking features such as rich text markup, spell check, printing, import and export, MarkDown editing, and backup recovery.

tomboy-ng is a fork of the now-discontinued note-taking app, Tomboy, whose best ‘selling point‘ was its ability to relate notes together thanks to its WikiWiki-like linking system. All you need to do in order to digitize your idea in an organized manner is to type a name. When you press the link button, tomboy-ng create a branch of the main idea, and all branches (as links) won’t break even when you rename or reorganize them.

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How to Install Privacy-friendly Whatsapp Alternative Signal in Linux

Filed under
Software

WhatsApp introduces its new privacy policy recently due to which signal emphasizing and getting much more attention for its privacy and security it offers. If you make your mind to

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Another Linux Kernel Vulnerability Was Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Security

Affecting Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla), Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa), Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 ESM (Trusty Tahr), the new security vulnerability (CVE-2020-28374) was discovered in Linux kernel’s LIO SCSI target implementation.

Due to this security issue, the LIO SCSI target implementation failed to perform sufficient identifier checking in certain XCOPY requests, allowing an attacker with access to one or more LUNs in a multiple backstore environment to either expose sensitive information or modify data.

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Proton 5.13-5 Fixes World Sounds in Cyberpunk 2077, Improves Fallout 76 and More

Filed under
Gaming

This is Proton’s first release in 2021 and brings quite a bunch of goodies from Proton Experimental, including support for world sounds in Cyberpunk 2077, support for a new OpenXR virtual reality API to use the VR mode of the Microsoft Flight Simulator game on AMD hardware, and online play in Red Dead Online and Read Dead Redemption 2.

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Haruna Video Player Is A Cool mpv GUI Frontend

Filed under
Software

Haruna is a free and open source Qt / QML video player for Linux that makes use of mpv (libmpv) for video playback.

libmpv makes it possible to embed mpv into other programs as the video / audio playback backend. New to mpv? This is a free and open source media player based on MPlayer, mplayer2 and FFmpeg, that runs on Linux, *BSD, macOS and Microsoft Windows, and there's also an Android port.
mpv has become quite popular in recent years thanks to features like high quality video output (using OpenGL as well as the new Vulkan API, which supports over 100 options for controlling playback quality, including the use of advanced upscaling filters, color management, etc.) with optional hardware acceleration.

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Help Quit WhatsApp

Filed under
Software

Recently, people got awareness to leave popular proprietary software WhatsApp. We even saw # Delete Whatsapp hashtags on social networks. For Ubuntu users who want to switch away from it here's alternatives, namely Telegram and Element, which are free and easy, and available for Ubuntu too. Fortunately, today both are also available for users who use Debian, Mint GNU/Linux, and other Ubuntu-family computers. For Android users, both are already available at F-Droid. They are Free Libre Open Source Software also known as FLOSS. We hope these will always be friendly and useful for us forever. Please share this with your friends!

Read more

Also: WhatsApp New Policy And the Backlash From “Common” People Will Cooldown

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Sven-Hendrik Haase: Manual pages indexing service

    We are happy to announce our newest public service: A manual pages indexing site at man.archlinux.org that publishes the man pages of all our packages and allows you to search and browse them. Check out, for example, the man page of tar.

  • Find new ways

    Sometimes it is time to critically question things and look for new ways. This is what we as the Ubuntu Community Council have initiated with the existing Local Communities (LoCo) project.
    The LoCos have been an integral part of the Ubuntu family since almost the beginning of Ubuntu. The aim of the LoCos is that people who are involved with Ubuntu find contact persons and like-minded people in their area, so that they are included in the Ubuntu community and also get help with possible questions or problems with Ubuntu.It is also the aim that these local units fill Ubuntu with life and organise events. In the past years they have been an important institution in building the community around Ubuntu.
    Last year, we at the newly elected Community Council wanted to re-staff the international council that oversees this LoCo and called for nominations. Unfortunately, there were not enough candidates so that we could re-staff this council.

  • Linux Foundation Launches Open Source Management & Strategy Training Program

    The Linux Foundation has announced a new training program designed to introduce open source best practices to management and technical staff within organizations, Open Source Management & Strategy.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Integrate Your Google Account into GNOME Shell

    Regardless of your feelings about Google, many people around the world use Google services every day. As such, it’s important to talk about all the amazing ways you can get easier access to your Google account, particularly for those trying to use Linux in the enterprise. This tutorial shows you how to integrate your Google account into GNOME Shell.

  • How to install notepadqq on Linux Mint 20.1

    In this video, we are looking at how to install notepadqq on Linux Mint 20.1.

  • How to install SMPlayer on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install SMPlayer on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to install Eternal Terminal for persistent SSH connections

    If you're an admin with Linux servers in your data center or cloud hosted account (such as AWS and Google Cloud), chances are pretty good you connect to those machines via SSH. Sometimes you need to remain connected for a good amount of time. You could be debugging code, working on containers or Kubernetes, or just about a thousand other reasons.

  • Install Windows 10 like Kylin desktop environment on Ubuntu 20.04

    Kylin Linux distro is the official flavor of Ubuntu released by Canonical and China’s MIIT to target the Chinese laptop and PC consumer market. Although it is based on the same official Ubuntu, however, its interface is much beautiful than the standard custom Gnome one. Ubuntu Kylin desktop environment which is also known as UKUI is more inclined towards the Windows 10 or Deepin like interface with sleek and colorful icons along with user-friendly elements that make it easy to use.

  • How To Install Apache Maven on Linux Mint 20 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Apache Maven on Linux Mint 20. For those of you who didn’t know, Apache Maven is an open-source project management and comprehension tool used primarily for Java projects. Maven uses a Project Object Model (POM), which is essentially an XML file containing information about the project, configuration details, the project’s dependencies, and more.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Apache Maven open-source data visualization and monitoring suite on a Linux Mint 20 (Ulyana).

  • How to use Cloudformation to create an EC2 instance

    Before we proceed I assume you are aware of the EC2 service on AWS and know its basic components. I would recommend visiting my article to create an EC2 instance using the AWS Console and understand the basics of the EC2 instance, click here to go to the article. In this article, we will create an EC2 instance with the latest Linux AMI using Cloudformation hence knowing the basics of cloud formation is required. Even if you are not aware of Cloudformation and would just like to create an instance using it, do not worry and proceed with the article.

Screencasts and Shows: Garuda KDE, RISC V and BSD Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Ravgeet Dhillon: Dynamic Home Route in a Flutter App

    In any production app, the user is directed to a route based on some authentication logic whenever the app is opened. In our Flutter App, we have at least two routes, Login and Dashboard. The problem is how can we decide which route should a user be redirected to?

    In this app, we will check the value of a locally stored boolean variable to dynamically decide the home route. We can use any method for writing our authentication logic, like checking the validity of the API token, but for the sake of simplicity, we will explore a simple logic.

  • How to add and customize Bootstrap in Nuxt.js

    Configuring things in any framework is always tricky especially when we are just starting. We will learn today that how can we add and customize Bootstrap in our Nuxt project. Once we go through this guide, we will get an overall idea of how to make things work in Nuxt. By learning how to setup Bootstrap, we can install Popper.js and JQuery as well which are peer dependencies for Bootstrap.

  • GCC 11 Is Moving Closer But Still Challenged By Many Regressions - Phoronix

    GCC 11 is slated to enter "Stage 4" development at the end of this weekend after which only regression and documentation fixes will be permitted. The first GCC 11 stable release should be out in 2~3 months, but at the moment there is an increasing number of P1 regressions that are of the highest priority.

    SUSE's Richard Biener announced today that GCC 11 will transition from stage three to stage four at the end of the week, at which point only regression fixes and documentation updates can be merged to trunk.

    There has been though another 30 P1 regressions, which are bugs of the highest priority, bringing the total count to 67. There is also 331 P2 regressions, 34 P3 regressions, 190 P4 regressions, and 24 P5 regressions. While some 60 P3 regressions were closed, there is a net gain of around 50 new bugs since the prior GCC 11 status report.

  • Cross-compiling made easy with Golang | Opensource.com

    I work with multiple servers with various architectures (e.g., Intel, AMD, Arm, etc.) when I'm testing software on Linux.

    [...]

    Until then, I had never accounted for this scenario (although I knew about it). I primarily work on scripting languages (usually Python) coupled with shell scripting. The Bash shell and the Python interpreter are available on most Linux servers of any architecture. Hence, everything had worked well before.

    However, now I was dealing with a compiled language, Go, which produces an executable binary. The compiled binary consists of opcodes or assembly instructions that are tied to a specific architecture. That's why I got the format error. Since the Arm64 CPU (where I ran the binary) could not interpret the binary's x86-64 instructions, it errored out. Previously, the shell and Python interpreter took care of the underlying opcodes or architecture-specific instructions for me.

  • C++ Types

    A C++ entity is a value, object, reference, function, enumerator, type, class member, bit-field, structured binding, namespace, template, template specialization, or parameter pack. An entity can be of one or more types. There are two categories of C++ types: fundamental and compound types. A scalar is arithmetic or a pointer object type. Fundamental types are scalars, while the rest of the entity types are compound types.

    The memory of a computer is a series of cells. Each cell has the size of one byte, it is normally the space occupied by a Western European character. The size of an object is given in bytes. This article gives a summary of C++ types. You should already have basic knowledge of C++, in order to understand this article.

  • Firebird Embedded in a sandboxed MacOS App

    For those who might not be aware, Firebird on MacOS is now relocatable, in that you don't necessarily have to install it as a Framework, this also means that you can create an embedded version out of the current installer.

  • 5 things we learned about Java in 2020 | Opensource.com

    In 2020, Java marked its 25th anniversary and, despite its age, remains strong and active. Its seven to 10 million developers make it one of the top three languages in use today, according to the TIOBE Index.

    To help celebrate Java reaching a quarter-century, Daniel Oh recounted Java's history before he explained How to install Java on a Mac (because its future depends on more people using it). To continue the party, we've compiled the top five things we learned about Java in 2020. Whether you're just starting with the language or experienced and trying to improve your Java development skills, these are things you should know.

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It was about time for the Raspberry Pi Foundation to release their own silicon, so here it is guys! Meet Raspberry Pi Pico, the result of several years of hard work designed to offer Raspberry Pi owners and anyone else who like building their own hardware high performance for integer workloads, flexible I/O, and low cost. Raspberry Pi Pico is built on the RP2040 microcontroller chip, which features a dual-core ARM Cortex-M0+ processor running at 133MHz, 264KB of on-chip RAM, support for up to 16MB of off-chip flash memory via a dedicated QSPI bus, DMA controller, as well as interpolator and integer divider peripherals. Read more

TUXEDO InfinityBook S 15 Linux Laptop Launches with Tiger Lake CPUs, Ultra Thin Design

Meet TUXEDO InfinityBook S 15, the smallest 15.6-inch Linux laptop offering from TUXEDO Computers that does not disappoint on any aspect. Its biggest attraction is the ultra thin design with 92 percent screen-to-body ratio and very compact design that can only be found on 14-inch laptops. The ultra modern and thin design is due to the 15.6-inch Full HD (1920×1080 pixels) IPS display featuring approximately 300 nits brightness, 800:1 contrast, 95% sRGB color gamut, and anti-reflective / non-glare coating, as well as the monocolor (white) backlit keyboard with TUX super-key, and a clickpad with multi-touch gestures. Read more

Debian based PinePhone Mobian Edition Review. Spec, Price, and More.

We take a detailed look at the PinePhone Mobian Edition and give you a perspective on the features, prices and comparisions. Read more