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Monday, 09 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Bob Belderbos

    This week we welcome Bob Belderbos (@bbelderbos) as our PyDev of the Week! Bob is a co-founder of PyBites. Bob has also contributed to Real Python and he’s a Talk Python trainer. You can learn more about Bob by checking out his website or visiting his Github profile. Let’s spend some quality time getting to know Bob better!

    Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

    I am a software developer currently working at Oracle in the Global Construction Engineering group. But I am probably better known as co-founder of PyBites, a community that masters Python through code challenges.

  • Spyder IDE: Variable Explorer improvements in Spyder 4

    Spyder 4 will be released very soon with lots of interesting new features that you'll want to check out, reflecting years of effort by the team to improve the user experience. In this post, we will be talking about the improvements made to the Variable Explorer.

    These include the brand new Object Explorer for inspecting arbitrary Python variables, full support for MultiIndex dataframes with multiple dimensions, and the ability to filter and search for variables by name and type, and much more.

    It is important to mention that several of the above improvements were made possible through integrating the work of two other projects. Code from gtabview was used to implement the multi-dimensional Pandas indexes, while objbrowser was the foundation of the new Object Explorer.

  • Django security releases issued: 2.2.8 and 2.1.15

    Since Django 2.1, a Django model admin displaying a parent model with related model inlines, where the user has view-only permissions to a parent model but edit permissions to the inline model, would display a read-only view of the parent model but editable forms for the inline.

    Submitting these forms would not allow direct edits to the parent model, but would trigger the parent model's save() method, and cause pre and post-save signal handlers to be invoked. This is a privilege escalation as a user who lacks permission to edit a model should not be able to trigger its save-related signals.

    To resolve this issue, the permission handling code of the Django admin interface has been changed. Now, if a user has only the "view" permission for a parent model, the entire displayed form will not be editable, even if the user has permission to edit models included in inlines.

    This is a backwards-incompatible change, and the Django security team is aware that some users of Django were depending on the ability to allow editing of inlines in the admin form of an otherwise view-only parent model.

  • Guidelines for BangPypers Dev Sprints

    How do you get started on open source programming? How can you contribute to that framework you’ve been itching to add an extra feature to? How do you get guidance and get help pushing your changes to merge upstream?

    If you’ve wondered on the above at least once, then you’re in dire need to attend one of our dev sprints.

  • Trey Hunner: Cyber Monday Python Sales

    Python Morsels is my weekly Python skill-building service.

    I’m offering something sort of like a “buy one get one free” sale this year.

    You can pay $200 to get 2 redemption codes, each worth 12 months of Python Morsels.

    You can use one code for yourself and give one to a friend. Or you could be extra generous and give them both away to two friends. Either way, 2 people are each getting one year’s worth of weekly Python training.

    You can find more details on this sale here.

Gemini – audio player with wallpaper changer

Filed under
Software

I’ve been writing reviews of Linux music players discovering a raft of gems along the way, together with a fair few turkeys. That’s the nature of open source software. It’s not necessarily an indication of quality or maturity. But with a mesmerizing selection on offer, there’s almost always free software that meets my specific requirements.

For this review, I’m looking at Gemini, an audio player that sports an integrated wallpaper changer.

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Tobias Bernard: LAS 2019

Filed under
OSS

A few weeks ago I attended the Linux App Summit in Barcelona. I arrived very late on Monday night by bus, after almost not making it to Spain that day (my train from Paris stopped in Montpellier due to the rails being destroyed by a storm and the highway was blocked by a protest). Adrien, Julian and I had a shared accommodation, which conveniently was just down the street from the venue.

On Tuesday and Wednesday I attended some talks, but was mostly focused on preparing the talk Jordan and I had on Wednesday afternoon. Talks with multiple presenters are always tough, especially if there’s not much time for practicing, but I think it went okay given the circumstances. There’s a recording on Youtube in the day 2 live stream video.

Over the course of the conference I had lots of good conversations about the state of free software with people from GNOME and other projects. In some areas it’s exciting how far we’ve come (e.g. Flatpak), but in others it’s frustrating how little has changed over the past decades (e.g. fragmentation).

Read more

Also: Tech Day by Init

GNOME: Adopting GitLab Workflow and Flatpak/Flathub

Filed under
GNOME
  • Adopting GitLab workflow

    As by November 26th, I’ve checked the amount of submissions we had on both libosinfo mailing list and libosinfo GitLab page during the current year.

    Mind that I’m not counting my own submissions and that I’m counting osinfo-db’s addition, which usually may consist in adding data & tests, as a single submission.

    As for the mailing list, we’ve received 32 patches; as for the GitLab, we’ve received 34 patches.

    Quite similar number of contributions, let’s dig a little bit more.

    The 32 patches sent to our mailing list came from 8 different contributors, and all of them had at least one previous patch merged in one of the libosinfo projects.

    The 34 patches sent to our GitLab came from 15 different contributors and, from those, only 6 of them had at least one previous patch merged in one of the libosinfo projects, whilst 9 of them were first time contributors (and I hope they’ll stay around, I sincerely do Wink).

    Maybe one thing to consider here is whether forking a project on GitLab is easier than subscribing to a new mailing list when submitting a patch. This is something people usually do once per project they contribute to, but subscribing to a mailing list may actually be a barrier.

    Some people would argue, though, it’s a both ways barrier, mainly considering one may extensively contribute to projects using one or the other workflow. IMHO, it’s not exactly true. Subscribing to a mailing list, getting the patches correctly formatted feels more difficult than forking a repo and submitting a Merge Request.

  • Sam Thursfield: Into the Pyramid

    I want to do my part for increasing the amount of apps that are easy to install Linux. I asked developers to Flatpak your app today last year, and this month I took the opportunity to package Purr Data on Flathub.

    Here’s a quick demo video, showing one of the PD examples which generates an ‘audible illusion’ of a tone that descends forever, known as a Shepard Tone.

    As always the motivation is a selfish one. I own an Organelle synth – it’s a hackable Linux-based device that generates sound using Pure Data, and I want to be able to edit the patches!

    Pure Data is a very powerful open source tool for audio programming, but it’s never had much commercial interest (unlike its proprietary sibling Max/MSP) and that’s probably why the default UI is still implemented in TCL/TK in 2019. The Purr Data fork has made a lot of progress on an alternative HTML5/JavaScript UI, so I decided this would be more suitable for a Flathub package.

Audiocasts: GNU World Order, Linux Action News and Open Source Security Podcast

Filed under
Interviews
  • GNU World Order 13x49

    **wall**, **whereis**, and **write**: the final 3 commands in the util-linux package.

  • Linux Action News 134

    We share Mozilla's concerns over Contract for the Web, and try out Kali Linux's new tricks.

    Also, our thoughts on the new Alexa Voice service coming to low-end IoT devices, and much more.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 172 - The security of planned obsolescence

    Josh and Kurt talk about the security implications of planned obsolescence. We use Intel's recent decision to remove old drivers from their website as the start of the conversation. By the end we realize this is more of a decision society needs to understand and make more than anything. Is constantly throwing out technology OK?

Games: Yogscast Jingle Jam, GCompris 0.97, Geneshift, RetroArch, Steam, Curious Expedition, Neon Noodles and Crusader Kings III

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Yogscast Jingle Jam bundle is back with 100% of the proceeds going to charity

    The Yogscast Jingle Jam, a bundle that Humble Bundle host each year is back with new games being added each day up until December 20 with 100% of the proceeds going to charity.

    Quite a different bundle to anything else they do, since it constantly adds new games and all the money goes to whatever charities have been selected. This year they include Wallace & Gromit's Grand Appeal, Stand Up to Cancer, Mental Health Foundation, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, War Child UK, Special Effect and more including our chosen charity The Free Software Foundation (FSF).

  • Release GCompris 0.97

    You can find packages of this new version for GNU/Linux, Windows and MacOS on the download page. This update will also be available soon in the Android Play store and the Windows store. For Raspberry Pi, we’ll provide an installer soon. The updated version for iOS is still not available. Note that the MacOS package is not yet notarized, we will look at doing this during next year.

    On the voices side, we added a new voice “try again” which is used in several activities instead of “check answer”. You can check on this page if this voice is available in your language: https://gcompris.net/voicestats/ (in the “Misc” section). You can help us by providing a nice recording of your voice for all the missing entries in your native language.

    On the translation side, we have 20 languages fully supported: Basque, Brazilian Portuguese, Breton, British English, Catalan, Chinese Traditional, Dutch, French, Galician, Greek, Italian, Macedonian, Malayalam, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Spanish, Swedish, Ukrainian.

    We also have 15 languages partially supported: Belarusian (65%), Catalan (Valencian 95%), Chinese Simplified (66%), Estonian (93%), Finnish (86%), German (96%), Hindi (73%), Hungarian (95%), Indonesian (95%), Irish Gaelic (78%), Norwegian Nynorsk (93%), Russian (76%), Scottish Gaelic (67%), Slovenian (54%), Turkish (95%).

  • Geneshift Battle Royale just got a lot prettier with a big update, also on sale right now

    Geneshift just keeps getting better! This indie action game that has a sweet fast-paced Battle Royale mode (along with a full single-player and co-op campaign) just had another rather huge update.

    For starters, it's had a bit of a graphical upgrade. It now has multisample anti-aliasing, upgraded player models that actually hold the weapons and an entirely new tilted camera angle. The new camera is a big improvement, giving you a proper sense of the height of objects around you, like getting some cover which the older top-down view just didn't give you.

  • RetroArch is getting hardware video decoding, manual content scanning and more

    The team behind the RetroArch front-end used with emulators, game engines and media players have announced that it will be getting proper hardware accelerated video decoding soon.

    Currently, all video decoding is done "entirely in software", so your CPU is doing the work instead of sending it off to your GPU which can cause slowdowns when your CPU is busy. They've said they're now going to be using FFmpeg supporting VDPAU and VAAPI. This might be good news for anyone using something like a Raspberry Pi, or other lower powered devices. You can see their full post on it here.

  • Steam Survey For November Points To Flat Linux Percentage

    With the start of a new month always comes the excitement of seeing what Valve's Steam Survey is pointing at for gaming trends as to the percentage of Linux gamers.

    For October 2019 the Linux gaming population on Steam according to Valve was about 0.83%, basically flat compared to September, at least on a percentage term. Meanwhile for the newly-published November figures it comes at 0.81%, or a decline of 0.02%.

  • Curious Expedition adds a RIVALS multiplayer mode with massive maps and it's great fun

    Curious Expedition, a roguelike expedition simulation game set in the late 19th century just recently had a big RIVALS update to add in multiplayer support. This isn't a DLC either, it's a full free update for everyone who owns the game which is fantastic.

    I'm quite a late arrival on this one, only picking it up in the sales recently and I ended up a little hooked on it so this was all rather good timing. The RIVALS mode is very similar to how it all works in single-player, with you each leading an expedition. You have to keep your people alive, deal with hostile wildlife and any random events as they pop up but all this is done across a map that's many times larger and you can see other expeditions roaming around which is quite odd.

  • Automate a futuristic food factory in Neon Noodles, out now in Early Access

    After a very promising early demo, Neon Noodles is out now in Early Access putting you in charge of automating food preparation. What could possibly go wrong?

    Directly inspired by similar such games from Zachtronics like Opus Magnum and Infinifactory, you're in charge of designing and building a fully automated kitchen. No programming needed, as it's all using simple blocks and commands. It's a lot more interesting than it sounds that's for sure!

  • Paradox give a little insight into murder and seduction in Crusader Kings 3's new Scheme system

    Crusader Kings III will allow you to run various secret schemes with a brand new system. Not just giving you the ability to take out a rival but perhaps sway someone over to your side too.

    In the latest developer diary, they talk about wanting a system like the Murder Plot from CKII but have it "slightly easier to predict while keeping it unreliable in its outcome" so that murder is still an option but not quite as safe as before. It also sounds like it's been both expanded and streamlined at the same time, to give you more options for scheming while also needing to send out less agents.

65% Off on Linux Foundation Training & Certifications [Cyber Monday Sale]

Filed under
News

The Linux Foundation is offering all beginner and advanced training and certification bundle at a discount of up to 65% off. The offer also includes instructor-led classes.
Read more

10 Best Linux Distros for Developers and Programmers

Filed under
Linux

Today, our focus is not on just Linux distributions, but the ones best suited for developers and programmers. This means that from the first time you boot the OS to when you install the applications you need to set up your environment, the prerequisite procedures are like a walk in a park and your programs run without irritating interruptions.

It is already common knowledge that Linux computing environments are easy to configure and are even configured for some form of development straight out of the box as opposed to an Operating System like Windows. But no two Operating Systems are the same and some are bound to fulfill your needs better than others.

Which one have you decided to use for your next programming project? Feel free to let us know your thoughts and suggestions in the comments section below.

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Holiday gift guide: Linux and open source tech gadgets

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Everything on Opensource.com's annual selection of tech gadgets would make an excellent holiday gift for your friends and family—or even something to add to your own holiday wishlist. Each of these gadgets encourages learning, exploring, and tinkering, qualities that reflect the values and interests of open source enthusiasts.

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Use the Window Maker desktop on Linux

Filed under
Linux

Before Mac OS X, there was a quirky closed-source Unix system called NeXTSTEP. Sun Microsystems later made NeXTSTEP's underpinnings an open specification, which enabled other projects to create free and open source versions of many NeXT libraries and components. GNUStep implemented the bulk of NeXTSTEP's libraries, and Window Maker implemented its desktop environment.

Window Maker mimics the NeXTSTEP desktop GUI closely and provides some interesting insight into what Unix was like in the late '80s and early '90s. It also reveals some of the foundational concepts behind window managers like Fluxbox and Openbox.

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New GNOME Design Team Mockups: Extension Tool, Font Manager & Revamped Clock App

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME design team is always hard at work iterating, ideating and improving on the form and function of apps and major UI elements throughout the GNOME desktop stack.

And a lot of that design and planning takes place out in the open, on mailing lists, issue trackers, code repos, and communication channels like Matrix and IRC.

One of the best places to get a feel for what the design team is working on is the GNOME Design GitLab. This GitLab group has a specific repo where application mockups are added, with the aim of garnering feedback and response from other design team members.

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App Highlight: Caligator is a Beautiful Calculator & Converter

Filed under
OSS

You will find lots of useful applications for Linux, however, not all of them focus primarily on the user experience.

Sure, the user interface may end up being something nice and simple but not necessarily pleasing to look at.

For the very same reason, I wanted to have a calculator and converter app on Linux similar to Numi (which is available only for macOS). I know we already have a superb calculator app like Qalculate but I am not a fan of its simple looking (read boring) interface.

Recently, I came across something very similar – ‘Caligator‘ made by Team XenoX.

Read more

DPL Sam Hartman: Voting Guide for Debian Init Systems GR

Filed under
Debian

So, under this proposal, a maintainer must integrate support for running
without systemd if it is available. They are responsible for going out
and finding this support. If the support is as simple as writing an
init script, the maintainer has an RC bug until they write the init
script. If the support is more complex, the maintainer is not
responsible for writing it. Proposal A is the same as Proposal E,
except that the bug is not release-critical. I'll go into Proposal A in
more detail after discussing Proposal D.



Proposal D is similar to Proposal E. My interpretation is that Proposal D places
somewhat less of a burden on maintainers to go out and find existing
non-systemd support. My interpretation is that the bug becomes RC when
someone contributes that support. (Or if the support is present in the
upstream but turned off in the package). Proposal D requires that
non-systemd support not have a substantial effect on systemd
installations. So where as Proposal E uses the designed exclusively for
systemd criteria, Proposal D uses the no substantial effect on systemd
systems criteria to determine whether working only with systemd is
acceptable. The discussions seemed to imply that if Gnome uses systemd
features in excess of what technologies like elogind can handle, it is
likely to meet both criteria.



Proposal D goes into a lot more detail than Proposal E. Proposal E
would likely be a long-term block on using systemd facilities like
sysusers. Proposal D specifically proposes a mechanism whereby such
facilities can be documented in policy. This mechanism is only
available if it is likely that developers of non-systemd (including
non-Linux) systems will implement the facility. After a six-to-twelve
month transition time, the facility can be used even on non-systemd
systems. So, sufficiently low effort in the non-systemd community that
it is unreasonable to expect a facility could be implemented could still
permanently block adoption of such facilities. Proposal D is definitely
about a long-term commitment to non-systemd systems even if the effort
in the non-systemd community is not as high as we'd like to adopt new
features elsewhere.



Proposal D also includes a number of guidelines for proper behavior
around these emotionally charged issues.

Read more

Also: Debian-Med Bug Squashing

Review: Obarun 2019.11.02 and Bluestar 5.3.6

Filed under
Reviews

This week I decided to test drive a distribution I have not reviewed before and, after looking through a handful of projects, my gaze landed on Obarun. The Obarun distribution is based on Arch Linux and features the s6 init software instead of the more commonly used systemd. The projects website describes Obarun as follows:

The goal of Obarun is to provide an alternative for people looking for more simplicity and transparency in maintaining their systems. Obarun is not designed with beginners to Linux in mind.

Obarun, like its parent, is a rolling release operating system which uses pacman as its package manager. The distribution is available in two editions: Minimal (589MB) and JWM (974MB). The former offers a command line interface while the latter provides a lightweight window manager. I decided to download the JWM edition. The project's website provides the default usernames and passwords for the live media. We are also given a summary of the installation steps which let us know we will need to set up an Internet connection and a partition for the operating system prior to launching Obarun's text-based installer. Obarun's media boots to a console interface and prompts us to login. If we login using the root account we are presented with a command line interface. However, if we sign in as the user oblive then the system loads the JWM graphical interface with a panel placed across the bottom of the screen. The network settings window then opens to make sure we know to enable an Internet connection.

The live media does not ship with a lot of software, but there are some utilities to help us get the operating set up, including the cfdisk disk partitioning tool. I like cfdisk because it can run in a terminal and is fairly easy to navigate. Using cfdisk and mkfs I created a fresh ext4 partition and mounted it prior to launching the system installer, obarun-install.

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Linux Mint Monthly News – November 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Many thanks to all the donors and sponsors who help fund our project. We received more than 500 donations in October. Many thanks to you for your support.

You probably know we’re aiming for a Christmas release this year All 3 editions of Linux Mint 19.3 passed QA and we’ll be announcing the BETA release on Tuesday!

We’re really excited about this release. The 19.x series is too years old and feels very polished. There are exciting features in 19.3 we haven’t talked about on the blog yet. The software selection changed and three new apps are coming in. The artwork is new and makes 19.3 feel really fresh.

We also have tray support for system reports. That’s something we think you’ll enjoy, and it’s helps us communicate with you better. It’s yet another way for us to document issues, workarounds and solutions and to target that information in a precise way, when it’s relevant to people who need it. This is new in 19.3, but it’s also something we’ll backport… so when the 19.3 stable release is officially announced, you won’t just find out about it here on this blog, you’ll also be notified from within Linux Mint.

I hope you all enjoy the upcoming release. We had a lot of fun working on it and it’s a real pleasure to see you use it. We look forward to receiving your feedback and to fix any bugs which might have passed our QA.

Read more

Also: Linux Mint 19.3 Backgrounds Slideshow

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More in Tux Machines

Software: Deb-pacman, Kiwi TCMS and Curl

  • Deb-pacman : A Pacman-style Frontend For APT Package Manager

    Apt, Advanced Packaging Tool, is a powerful command line tool used to install, update, upgrade and remove packages in Debian and its derivatives like Ubuntu. There are several frontends available for Apt, such as Aptitude, Synaptic and Ubuntu software center to name a few. Today I am going to introduce yet another frontend for APT package manager called Deb-pacman. Deb-pacman is a Bash script that emulates the functionality of Pacman (the package manager for Arch Linux and its variants). Using Deb-pacman, you can use the pacman commands, as the way you use them under Arch Linux to install, update, upgrade and remove packages, in a Debian-based system. You can simply invoke “pacman” instead of “apt” command in your Ubuntu system. Deb-pacman simply emulates the Archlinux’s Pacman package manager feel for Debian users who may prefer the style of Pacman over Apt. This can be helpful for those who get used to pacman. As you know already Apt itself was originally designed as a front-end for dpkg, which was developed by Ian Murdock (founder of Debian project) for Debian OS to install, remove and provide information about .deb packages. So technically speaking Deb-pacman is a front end for APT which is a frontend for Dpkg. In other words, it is just a wrapper.

  • Kiwi TCMS 7.2

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 7.2! This is an improvement & bug fix release which includes new database migrations and API methods, internal refactoring and updated translations. You can explore everything at https://public.tenant.kiwitcms.org!

  • Daniel Stenberg: This is your wake up curl

    One of the core functionalities in libcurl is the ability to do multiple parallel transfers in the same thread. You then create and add a number of transfers to a multi handle. Anyway, I won’t explain the entire API here but the gist of where I’m going with this is that you’ll most likely sooner or later end up calling the curl_multi_poll() function which asks libcurl to wait for activity on any of the involved transfers – or sleep and don’t return for the next N milliseconds. Calling this waiting function (or using the older curl_multi_wait() or even doing a select() or poll() call “manually”) is crucial for a well-behaving program. It is important to let the code go to sleep like this when there’s nothing to do and have the system wake up it up again when it needs to do work. Failing to do this correctly, risk having libcurl instead busy-loop somewhere and that can make your application use 100% CPU during periods. That’s terribly unnecessary and bad for multiple reasons.

Gamechuck sponsors Krita

Gamechuck, a new studio based in Zagreb, has just released the first trailer for their upcoming role-playing adventure game Trip the Ark Fantastic. Trip the Ark Fantastic is planned for release in 2022 on PC/Mac/Linux and consoles, and Gamechuck has created the game entirely with free software. What’s more, they have also decided to sponsor Krita’s development! Trip the Ark Fantastic is a story-driven roleplaying adventure set in the Animal Kingdom on the verge of both industrial and social revolution. The story follows Charles, a hedgehog scholar on a mission by the lion king to save the monarchy, but his decisions could end up helping reformists or even to bring about anarchy. Read more Also: Interview with teteotolis

Audiocasts/Shows: GNU World Order, Linux Action News and Librem 5 USA

  • GNU World Order 13x50

    Listener feedback.

  • Linux Action News 135

    Ubuntu Pro is a click away, and their kernel goes rolling on AWS. We process the range of announcements, while Mozilla cranks up the security and impresses us with DeepSpeech. Plus why Ubuntu is taking the Windows Subsystem for Linux so seriously.

  • The $2000 Dollar Linux Phone | Librem 5 USA

    Well isn't this interesting... a $2000 dollar Linux phone. Yeah, that is three zeros and I must say this phone... is different

Matroska (MKV) Creation Software Suite MKVToolNix Sees New 41.0.0 Release

MKVToolNix, a free and open source set of tools for creating, editing and inspecting Matroska (MKV, MK3D, MKA, and MKS) files, has seen a new release which brings support for reading Opus audio and VP9 video from MP4 files for mkvmerge, improvements for predefined track names, and more. MKVToolNix is made of 4 command line tools: mkvmerge (create Matroska files from other media files), mkvinfo (show Matroska file information), mkvextract (extracts tracks / data from Matroska files), and mkvpropedit (change the properties of existing Matroska files without a complete remux), as well as MKVToolNix GUI (a Qt GUI for mkvmerge, mkvinfo and mkvpropedit). The tools are available on Linux, *BSD, Windows and macOS. With the latest MKVToolNix 41.0.0, Vorbis, Opus and VP8 stream comments (Vorbis comments) are converted to Matroska attachments for cover art, and Matroska track tags for other comments. This has been implemented for both the Matroska and Ogg readers. Read more