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Saturday, 17 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games: ACardShooter, Mable & The Wood and Wine 4.14 Roy Schestowitz 3 17/08/2019 - 4:03pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/08/2019 - 3:52pm
Story 10 Best Terminal emulators for Linux that are worth giving a try Roy Schestowitz 17/08/2019 - 3:29pm
Story The New Firmware Manager: Updating firmware across Linux distributions Roy Schestowitz 17/08/2019 - 3:20pm
Story Programming: GCC, Rust and Git Roy Schestowitz 17/08/2019 - 3:12pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/08/2019 - 3:03pm
Story Games: Mutant Year Zero Road To Eden and Unigine 2.9 Roy Schestowitz 17/08/2019 - 2:40pm
Story Linux 5.4 To Expose What's Keeping The System Awake Via Sysfs Roy Schestowitz 17/08/2019 - 12:52pm
Story Chrome murders FTP like Jeffrey Epstein Roy Schestowitz 17/08/2019 - 10:37am
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/08/2019 - 10:34am

Linux and Hardware: XScale IOP, Adlink and eMMC Flash Memory

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Linux 5.4 Set To Remove Intel XScale IOP33X/IOP13XX CPU Support

    Linux 5.4 is set to remove the Intel IOP33X and IOP13XX series of processors that are part of the company's former XScale product line for ARM-based CPUs. 

    The XScale IOP processors were intended for handling I/O offloading from the main device CPU. These sub-1.2GHz processors were part of Intel's ARMv8.5-based XScale product portfolio. But with no apparent users of the Intel IOP33X/IOP13XX hardware left -- at least anyone that would likely be riding new Linux kernel releases -- that support is going to be removed later this year with the Linux 5.4 release. 

  • Type 2 customers can now update to Skylake and Kaby Lake

    Adlink has released two Linux-ready COM Express Basic Type 2 modules for legacy customers: The Express-SL2 offers Intel 6th Gen and the Express-KL2 features 7th Gen processors.

    Back in 2014, Adlink launched a pair of COM Express Type 2 drop-in replacement modules running on Intel 4th Gen. Core (Express-HL2) and Bay Trail Atom (cExpress-BT2). We had thought that might be the end of Type 2 replacement products. Yet, there are still many customers that are not ready to move to the identically sized (125 x 95mm) Basic Type 6. As a result, Adlink is back with the 6th Gen Skylake Express-SL2 and 7th Gen Kaby Lake Express-KL2 to keep legacy Type 2 customers up to date “for at least another 10 years,” says the company.

  • Wear Estimation for Devices with eMMC Flash Memory

Canonical Outs Major Linux Kernel Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Ubuntu

Available for Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 ESM (Trusty Tahr), the new Linux kernel security updates are here to patch more than 30 security vulnerabilities, including a heap buffer overflow discovered in the Marvell Wireless LAN device driver and a NULL pointer dereference discovered in the Near-field communication (NFC) implementation.

The security patch also addresses a use-after-free vulnerability discovered by Google Project Zero's Jann Horn in the Linux kernel when accessing LDT entries, as well as a race condition when performing core dumps. A flaw discovered by Andrei Vlad Lutas and Dan Lutas in x86 processors, which incorrectly handled SWAPGS instructions during speculative execution, was fixed as well.

Read more

The Best App Launchers for Ubuntu & Linux Mint

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

So, thankfully, there is a world of alternative app launchers for Linux desktops — launchers that are more traditional, more interactive, and/or often more capable than what Ubuntu includes out of the box.

Inspired by my recent play with rofi on the Regolith desktop I decided to test a bunch of ’em to compile this: a list of the best app launchers for Ubuntu and Linux Mint (in my opinion, of course).

Read more

Stable kernels 5.2.9, 4.19.67, and 4.14.139

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.2.9

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.2.9 kernel.

    All users of the 5.2 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.2.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.2.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.19.67
  • Linux 4.14.139

Feral GameMode on Ubuntu: Everything You Need to Know

Filed under
Ubuntu

Feral GameMode is a discreet background utility that aims to improve gaming performance on Linux distributions like Ubuntu.

It’s not a GUI app; there’s no multi-button dashboard, no toggle-fest, and no real feedback on how it’s running.

Games compatible with GameMode are able to ‘request’ that a specific set of tweaks are applied to the host system and/or the game process(es) for a short period.

These tweaks ensure system resources prioritise the gaming experience over other tasks, like drawing your desktop background or checking for updates.

Read more

today's howtos and programming leftovers

Filed under
Development
HowTos
  • Linux Commands for Beginners 15 - Bash History
  • How To Find Top Most Used Commands On Linux
  • ANNOUNCE: libnbd 0.9.8 - prerelease of high performance NBD
    I'm pleased to announce a new high performance Network Block Device
    (NBD) client library called libnbd.  It's written in C and there are
    also bindings available for Python, OCaml and (soon) Rust.
    
    0.9.8 is the third pre-release before the stable 1.0 version where we
    freeze the API, so feedback on API-related issues is very welcome now.
    
    Download:       http://download.libguestfs.org/libnbd/
    Documentation:  https://github.com/libguestfs/libnbd/blob/master/docs/libnbd.pod
    Fedora package: https://koji.fedoraproject.org/koji/packageinfo?packageID=28807
    Debian package: https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=933223
    Git repo:       https://github.com/libguestfs/libnbd
    Mailing list:   address@hidden (no subscription required)
    
    Here are some of the things you can do with this library ...
    
    Connect to an NBD server and grab the first sector of the disk:
    https://github.com/libguestfs/libnbd/blob/a5f8fd2f0f48e9cf2487e23750b55f67b166014f/examples/simple-fetch-first-sector.c#L14
    
    High performance multi-threaded reads and writes, with multiple
    connections and multiple commands in flight on each connection:
    https://github.com/libguestfs/libnbd/blob/master/examples/threaded-reads-and-writes.c
    
    Integrate with glib main loop:
    https://github.com/libguestfs/libnbd/blob/master/examples/glib-main-loop.c
    
    Connect to an NBD server from an interactive shell:
    
      $ nbdkit -f linuxdisk . &
      $ nbdsh --connect nbd://localhost
    
      Welcome to nbdsh, the shell for interacting with
      Network Block Device (NBD) servers.
    
      nbd> h.get_size()
      716266496
      nbd> buf = h.pread (512, 0)
      nbd> print ("%r" % buf)
      [prints the first sector]
    
    Use ‘fio’ to benchmark an NBD server:
    
      $ nbdkit -U - memory size=256M \
            --run 'export unixsocket ; fio examples/nbd.fio '
    
    Rich.
    

  • libnbd 0.9.8 and stable APIs

    I announced libnbd yesterday. The libnbd 0.9.8 is a pre-release for the upcoming 1.0 where we will finalize the API and offer API and ABI stability. Stable APIs aren’t in fashion these days, but they’re important because people who choose to use your platform for their software shouldn’t be screwed over and have to change their software every time you change your mind. In C it’s reasonably easy to offer a stable API while allowing long term evolution and even incompatible changes. This is what we do for nbdkit and will be doing for libnbd. The first concept to get to know is ELF symbol versioning. Chapter 3 of Uli’s paper on the subject covers this in great detail. In libnbd all our initial symbols will be labelled with LIBNBD_1.0.

  • PyCharm 2019.2.1 RC

    PyCharm 2019.2.1 release candidate is available now!

  • Basics of Memory Management in Python

    Memory management is the process of efficiently allocating, de-allocating, and coordinating memory so that all the different processes run smoothly and can optimally access different system resources. Memory management also involves cleaning memory of objects that are no longer being accessed.

    In Python, the memory manager is responsible for these kinds of tasks by periodically running to clean up, allocate, and manage the memory. Unlike C, Java, and other programming languages, Python manages objects by using reference counting. This means that the memory manager keeps track of the number of references to each object in the program. When an object's reference count drops to zero, which means the object is no longer being used, the garbage collector (part of the memory manager) automatically frees the memory from that particular object.

    The user need not to worry about memory management as the process of allocation and de-allocation of memory is fully automatic. The reclaimed memory can be used by other objects.

  • Twisted 19.7.0 Released

    On behalf of Twisted Matrix Laboratories and our long-suffering release manager Amber Brown, I am honored to announce the release of Twisted 19.7.0!

Games: Filament, Dota Underlords and Cerulean Days

Filed under
Gaming
  • Solve cable-based puzzles in the fully narrated game Filament, coming to Linux next year

    Currently in development by Beard Envy with publishing from Kasedo Games, the puzzle game Filament has you exploring a seemingly abandoned spaceship while sorting out all the cables.

    From what they said about it, it's a story-rich and full narrated puzzle game. One that's meant to be somewhat relaxing with you able to go at your own pace. Going by the official announcement, Linux support is confirmed for release sometime in Q1 next year.

  • Dota Underlords changes ranking again to be more about skill and less about time

    While in Early Access, Dota Underlords is in a constant state of flux and Valve have again changed the ranking system.

    They're now using the well-known Elo rating system, so the number of points gained or lost now depends on the skill of your opponents. Why the switch? As Valve said, the Lords of White Spire leaderboard ended up being a list of who played the most instead of the best so they're hoping this will solve it and be a little more fair to those who don't play all the time.

  • Cerulean Days, a Visual Novel following the internet being shut down after a biological attack

    Cerulean Days certainly sounds like an intriguing Visual Novel. Set on a small modern island in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, a deadly biological attack took place so the government shut the internet down, leaving the island disconnected from the world around it.

    [...]

    If you're interested in trying it out, they do have a Linux demo available, looks like it was made with Ren'Py and it works quite well. Seems like it has some nice writing to it too along with some great artwork.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Sliding Politics and PyBites

Filed under
Interviews
  • LHS Episode #297: The Weekender XXXII

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Sliding Politics | User Error 72

    Dealing with users who hate change, dumb phones, and different approaches to social media consumption.

    Plus infidelity, the state of the world, and consequences of small decisions.

  • Test and Code: 83: PyBites Code Challenges behind the scenes - Bob Belderbos

    Bob Belderbos and Julian Sequeira started PyBites a few years ago.
    They started doing code challanges along with people around the world and writing about it.

    Then came the codechalleng.es platform, where you can do code challenges in the browser and have your answer checked by pytest tests. But how does it all work?

    Bob joins me today to go behind the scenes and share the tech stack running the PyBites Code Challenges platform.

    We talk about the technology, the testing, and how it went from a cool idea to a working platform.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • vBSDCon - Sept 5-7 Reston VA

    The schedule has been added to the website: https://www.vbsdcon.com/schedule/

  • Raspberry Digital Signage donation

    The build of Raspberry Digital Signage you can download from SourceForge is limited is some functionality: if you like this project please donate.

    As a donor, you will have full access to the unrestricted versions of: Raspberry Digital Signage (web-based digital signaging), Raspberry Slideshow (image/video slideshow-based digital signaging) and Raspberry WebKiosk (cheap web kiosking), which can be deployed on how many devices you wish!

Open Hardware and ARM

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Designing open audio hardware as DIY kits

    Previously in this series about people who are developing audio technology in the open, I interviewed Juan Rios, developer and maintainer of Guayadeque and Sander Jansen, developer and maintainer of Goggles Music Manager. These conversations have broadened my thinking and helped me enjoy their software even more than before.

    For this article, I contacted Håvard Skrödahl, founder of Muffsy. His hobby is designing open source audio hardware, and he offers his designs as kits for those of us who can't wait to wind up the soldering iron for another adventure.

    I've built two of Håvard's kits: a moving coil (MC) cartridge preamp and a moving magnet (MM) cartridge phono preamp. Both were a lot of fun to build and sound great. They were also a bit of a stroll down memory lane for me. In my 20s, I built some other audio kits, including a Hafler DH-200 power amplifier and a DH-110 preamplifier. Before that, I built a power amplifier using a Motorola circuit design; both the design and the amplifier were lost along the way, but they were a lot of fun!

  • Nuvoton Launches Brand New M261/M262/M263 Series MCUs for IoT Applications

    Low power and robust security are two major requirements for the Internet of Things (IoT) applications. In terms of low power consumption, NuMicro M261/M262/M263 series provides multiple power modes for different operating scenarios, integrating RTC with independent VBAT to support low power mode. The power consumption in normal run mode is 97 μA/MHz (LDO mode) and 45 μA/MHz (DC-DC mode). Standby power-down current is down to 2.8 μA and Deep power-down current is less than 2 μA. The low power, low supply voltage, and fast wake-up (9 μs from Fast-wakeup Power-down mode) features make M261/M262/M263 series suitable for battery-powered IoT applications.

    The robust security functions of NuMicro M261/M262/M263 series include secure boot function to ensure that a device boots using only trusted software through a series of digital signature authentication processes. The M261/M262/M263 series integrates complete hardware crypto engines such as AES 256/192/128, DES/3-DES, SHA, ECC, and True Random Number Generator (TRNG). Furthermore, it provides 4-region programable eXecute-Only-Memory (XOM) to secure critical program codes and up to six tamper detection pins against outer physical attack, which significantly improves the product security.

    [...]

    Third-Party IDEs such as Keil MDK, IAR EWARM, and NuEclipse IDE with GNU GCC compilers are also supported.

  • Arm, WDC and Qualcomm Announce OpenChain Conformance Activities

    Arm and Western Digital Corporation, Platinum Members of the OpenChain Project and key participants in the global supply chain, today announce conformance with the OpenChain Specification. Qualcomm Technologies, Inc., Platinum Member and founding contributor of the OpenChain Project, today announces expanded conformance to the latest version of the OpenChain Specification.

    The OpenChain Project establishes trust in the open source from which software solutions are built. It accomplishes this by making open source license compliance simpler and more consistent. The OpenChain Specification defines inflection points in business workflows where a compliance process, policy or training should exist to minimize the potential for errors and maximize the efficiency of bringing solutions to market. The companies involved in the OpenChain community number in the hundreds. The OpenChain Specification is being prepared for submission to ISO and evolution from a growing de facto standard into a formal standard.

Graphics: Radeon (AMD) Software for Linux 19.30 and Intel Code

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Radeon Software for Linux 19.30 Updated With Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS Support

    In addition to AMD releasing the Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise 19.Q3 Linux driver, they also quietly released a new Radeon Software Linux driver release for consumer GPUs.

    This new Radeon Software for Linux release is still in the 19.30 release stream as was the case since the AMD Navi launch driver one month ago. But with this updated Radeon Software for Linux 19.30 driver they now are claiming official support for the Radeon RX 5700 (Navi) series.

  • Intel Volleys Another Batch Of Tiger Lake "Gen 12" Graphics Code

    While it remains to be seen if Tiger Lake will be able to ship on time in 2020 as the Icelake successor, the "Gen 12" Xe Graphics continue to be worked on with the company's open-source Linux graphics driver.

    At the end of June Intel sent out the very preliminary open-source Linux graphics driver changes for Tiger Lake that is coming with "Gen 12" graphics compared to Gen 11 with Icelake. Though so far at least there hasn't been too many changes to the driver side while today a third round of Tiger Lake enablement patches were sent out.

Etnaviv Is Packing Code For An Exciting Linux 5.4 Cycle

Filed under
Linux

While Freedreno and Panfrost have been steaming ahead when it comes to open-source, reverse-engineered graphics for Arm SoCs, the Etnaviv project for targeting Vivante graphics hasn't had too much to report on recently. Fortunately, that's changing as coming up for the Linux 5.4 cycle they have a lot of new code to introduce.

The biggest Etnaviv DRM driver feature for Linux 5.4 is supporting per-process address spaces on capable GPUs, which is necessary for bringing up their Softpin support and in turn supporting the texture descriptor buffers on GC7000 series hardware.

Read more

Also: QEMU 4.1 Released With Many ARM, MIPS & x86 Additions

ClockworkPi Rolls Out GameShell, A DIY Kit To Build Your Own Modular Console

Filed under
Hardware
Gaming

ClockworkPI is providing tech enthusiasts the opportunity to build their own modular console with the GameShell.

The gadget is the result of the Kickstarter launched in April 2018. The campaign raised a total of $290,429 or almost six times the original goal of $50,000. Nearly 3,000 people pledged money for the company to push through with the project.

The gadget was billed to be the first mobile and modular game console using an open-source GNU/Linux system. After building the kit, you can play thousands of retro games from major publishers like Atari, SNES, NES, GBA, and GB.

Read more

Kdevops Introduced

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • kdevops: a devops framework for Linux kernel development

    I'm announcing the release of kdevops which aims at making setting up and testing the Linux kernel for any project as easy as possible. Note that setting up testing for a subsystem and testing a subsystem are two separate operations, however we strive for both. This is not a new test framework, it allows you to use existing frameworks, and set those frameworks up as easily can humanly be possible. It relies on a series of modern hip devops frameworks, it relies on ansible, vagrant and terraform, ansible roles through the Ansible Galaxy, and terraform modules.

  • Kdevops Aims To Assist In Linux Kernel Testing

    Luis Chamberlain has announced the first release of Kdevops as a Linux kernel development "DevOps" framework.

    Kdevops aims to be the first modern devops framework for the Linux kernel. Kdevops can target different virtualization platforms, cloud providers, and Linux distributions. This devops framework is built off Ansible, Vagrant, and Terraform while it doesn't integrate any testing frameworks itself but leaves that open to the developer for integration.

Popular mpv Player is now Celluloid

Filed under
Software
Movies

The popular media player mpv is renamed as Celluloid and released latest installment.

Celluloid (formerly GNOME mpv) is a GTK+ based free and open source media player. Celluloid is very lightweight and can easily be adapated as an alternative to popular VLC Media player. This slick media player interacts with mpv via the client API exported by libmpv, allowing access to mpv’s powerful playback capabilities.

Some notable features of Celluloid includes the implementation of MPRIS D-Bus Interface which allows for better integration with desktop environments that have compatible MPRIS clients, fully functional Wayland support.

Read more

Cockpit and the evolution of the Web User Interface

Filed under
Server

This article only touches upon some of the main functions available in Cockpit. Managing storage devices, networking, user account, and software control will be covered in an upcoming article. In addition, optional extensions such as the 389 directory service, and the cockpit-ostree module used to handle packages in Fedora Silverblue.

The options continue to grow as more users adopt Cockpit. The interface is ideal for admins who want a light-weight interface to control their server(s).

Read more

Proprietary Software in "AI" Clothing

Filed under
Software
  • AI Algorithms Need FDA-Style Drug Trials

    Intelligent systems at scale need regulation because they are an unprecedented force multiplier for the promotion of the interests of an individual or a group. For the first time in history, a single person can customize a message for billions and share it with them within a matter of days. A software engineer can create an army of AI-powered bots, each pretending to be a different person, promoting content on behalf of political or commercial interests. Unlike broadcast propaganda or direct marketing, this approach also uses the self-reinforcing qualities of the algorithm to learn what works best to persuade and nudge each individual.

  • Stop Calling it AI

    The hype on terms like “machine learning” and “AI” is a rebranding of the terms “statistics” and “general programming logic”. It’s a long ways away from the scary AI you envision from sci-fi. At best, it makes cancer research faster. At worst, it spends a lot of research money on AWS.

    End of the day, it’s so far away from being a boogeyman that you should refocus on things that matter like global warming or overpopulation.

  • How AI is impacting the UK's legal sector

    A recent study of London law firms by CBRE revealed that 48 percent are already using AI and a further 41 percent will start to do so in the near future. Furthermore, a Deloitte study estimated 100,000 legal roles will be automated by 2036, and by 2020 law firms will be faced with a “tipping point” for a new talent strategy. As a result, law firms that don’t start to embrace AI capabilities risk falling behind their more innovative peers.

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KNOPPIX 8.6.0 Public Release

Version 8.6 basiert auf → Debian/stable (buster), mit einzelnen Paketen aus Debian/testing und unstable (sid) (v.a. Grafiktreiber und aktuelle Productivity-Software) und verwendet → Linux Kernel 5.2.5 sowie Xorg 7.7 (core 1.20.4) zur Unterstützung aktueller Computer-Hardware. Read more English: Knoppix 8.6 new public version is finally out !

Linux 5.3 Kernel Yielding The Best Performance Yet For AMD EPYC "Rome" CPU Performance

Among many different Linux/open-source benchmarks being worked on for the AMD EPYC "Rome" processors now that our initial launch benchmarks are out of the way are Linux distribution comparisons, checking out the BSD compatibility, and more. Some tests I wrapped up this weekend were seeing how recent Linux kernel releases perform on the AMD EPYC 7742 64-core / 128-thread processors. For some weekend analysis, here are benchmarks of Linux 4.18 through Linux 5.3 in its current development form. All tests were done on the same AMD EPYC 7742 2P server running Ubuntu 19.04 and using the latest kernels in each series via the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA. Read more

Fedora 29 to 30 upgrade - How it went

Alas, my Fedora 30 experience started strong with the first review and soured since. The test on the old laptop with Nvidia graphics highlighted numerous problems, including almost ending up in an unbootable state due to the wrong driver version being selected by the software center. With the in-vivo upgrade, I almost ended up in a similar state due to some incompatibility with extensions. I wasn't pleased by other glitches and errors, and the performance improvement margin isn't as stellar as the clean install test. All in all, Fedora 30 feels like a rather buggy release, with tons of problems. I think versions 27 to 29 were quite robust overall, at least the Gnome version, but the latest edition is quite rough. That would mean I'd advise people upgrading to take care of their data, remember the possible snags like extensions, and triple check their hardware is up to the task, because apparently QA isn't cool anymore, and no one else will do this for you. All in all, Fedora 30 is very bleeding edge, finicky, definitely not for everyday use by ordinary desktop folks. It's a dev tool for devs, so if you want something stable and boring, search elsewhere. Read more

Neptune 6.0 Released, Which is based on Debian 10 (Buster)

Leszek has pleased to announce the release of the new stable release of Neptune 6.0 on 1th Aug, 2019. It’s first stable release of Neptune 6.0 based on Debian 10 “Buster”, featuring the KDE Plasma desktop with the typical Neptune tweaks and configurations. The base of the system is Linux Kernel in version 4.19.37 which provides the necessary hardware support. Plasma 5.14.5 features the stable and flexible KDE made desktop that is loved by millions. Read more