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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 22 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) Daily Build ISOs Are Now Available to Download Rianne Schestowitz 1 22/10/2019 - 4:33pm
Story Intel Core i7-1065G7 Ice Lake Linux Performance Benchmarks Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2019 - 3:50pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2019 - 3:46pm
Story Ubuntu release could stir the Linux pot with delighted users Rianne Schestowitz 1 22/10/2019 - 3:39pm
Story Regolith Linux Adds Support for Ubuntu 19.10 Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2019 - 3:22pm
Story Intel adds 10nm Ice Lake desktop and server CPUs to Linux kernel Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2019 - 3:09pm
Story Programming: Picolibc, NGT, Tryton, OCaml, GNOME and KDE Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2019 - 12:43pm
Story Graphics: Mesa 19.1.8, dGPU and Intel Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2019 - 12:22pm
Story Leftovers: GNOME Lawsuit, Clear Linux, Freespire, OmniOS, Mozilla and Proprietary Traps Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2019 - 11:43am
Story Fedora, Red Hat and IBM Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2019 - 11:21am

Events: CopyleftConf, Oggcamp and FOSDEM

Filed under
OSS
  • CopyleftConf 2020

    A week before Software Freedom Conservancy had announced the CopyleftConf 2020. The conference is going to take place on 3 February 2020, Monday, in Brussels, Belgium.

    The first edition of CopyleftConf took place in February 2019. One can have a look at the videos here The organizers do plan it after Fosdem.

  • The fight to get home from Oggcamp 2019

    I’d heard that parking in Manchester was not only a nightmare and that you would have to sell your children into slavery to pay the parking fee for a few hours so with that in mind I decided to use the train. Now to get to Manchester by car from my house

    takes around an hour and a half so long as you stick within the speed limit. My train was set to eat two and a half hours from my lifes timeline, but I felt it was a small price to pay given I was only going to do one day of a two-day event.

    My journey to Oggcamp started at 6.55 am the train took me to Birmingham New Street, where I was due to change for the onward train to Manchester, on the way up to Birmingham, we stopped at Wolverhampton train station. My connection was on-time, and I made myself as comfortable as possible in my reserved seat. To my horror, a rather large gentleman poured himself into the seat next to me and mine if truth be told. We set off heading back the way we came and just for the fun of it and to wind me up a little our first stop was, yes, you guessed it, Wolverhampton train station. I could see the next two hours were going to be a bundle of joy as I tried to look at my phone while feeling that I was confined in an invisible straight jacket if only that were the extent of my problems. Mr Creosote decided that after consuming his breakfast which he had brought on board, it was now time to have a little sleep. “What’s wrong with that?” I hear you ask. Mr Creosote promptly started to snore like farmer Giles’s prized Gloucestershire Old Spot pig. Two hours later, frazzled we arrived in Manchester Mr Creosote had been kind enough to wake up in Macclesfield just enough time for my bladder to fill to bursting along with my fit to burst brain after all that snoring. Oh, and I forgot to mention the lad opposite who while sat underneath a sign saying “Please be considerate to those around you” played videos of South Park amongst other things at full volume on his phone. Never heard of headphones arsehole?

  • FOSDEM 2020 IoT Devroom Call for Proposals

    FOSDEM (Free & Open-source Software Developers’ European Meeting) takes place every year in Brussels, Belgium on the first weekend of February.

Graphics: Vulkan and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RLSL Allows Running A Subset Of Rust On Vulkan/SPIR-V Enabled GPUs

    There was a recent Khronos meet-up in Munich where Maik Klein of Embark Studios talked about their work on bringing a sub-set of the Rust programming language to Vulkan (SPIR-V) enabled GPUs.

    RLSL is the project being worked on by the Swedish game studio for opening up Rustlang use for GPUs to benefit from the language's same design advantages, provide a unified front-end, and being able to leverage the existing Rust ecosystem with the likes of Cargo/crates.

  • Raspberry Pi 4's V3D Driver Lands OpenGL ES 3.1 Bits In Mesa 19.3-devel

    The Broadcom "V3D" Gallium3D driver that is most notably used by the new Raspberry Pi 4 boards now is effectively at OpenGL ES 3.1 support within the newest Mesa 19.3 code.

    We've known that Igalia has been ironing out OpenGL ES 3.1 for V3D after taking over the work from Eric Anholt who left Broadcom earlier this year to go work for Google.

    Merged this past week was the OpenGL compute shader bits as the main blocker that prevented the V3D open-source Gallium3D driver from exposing GLES 3.1. Following that was a memory violation fix and then explicitly exposing OpenGL ES Shading Language 3.1. That merge request does note that a few more fixes are still needed before V3D will officially pass all of the OpenGL ES 3.1 conformance tests, but at least Mesa 19.3's code is good enough along to enable the support.

Ubuntu: AMD Support, NVIDIA GPU Operator and More

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 19.10 Doesn't Ship With AMD Navi / Radeon RX 5700 Support Working, But Easy To Enable

    While last week's release of Ubuntu 19.10 "Eoan Ermine" is new enough for Radeon RX 5700 series support with the Linux 5.3 kernel and Mesa 19.2, it doesn't actually work out-of-the-box for these Navi graphics cards.

    While the principal driver components of the Linux kernel and Mesa3D (for RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV Vulkan) are new enough with Navi support, Ubuntu 19.10's support isn't rounded out because its linux-firmware package isn't new enough for containing the necessary Navi firmware binaries required for the open-source driver usage. So if booting a clean Ubuntu 19.10 install with Radeon RX 5700, you are likely to just see a blank screen.

  • NVIDIA GPU Operator – Simplifying AI/ML Deployments on the Canonical Platform

    Leveraging Kubernetes for AI deployments is becoming increasingly popular. Chances are if your business is involved in AI/ML with Kubernetes you are using tools like Kubeflow to reduce complexity, costs and deployment time. Or, you may be missing out!

    With AI/ML being the tech topics of the world, GPUs play a critical role in the space. NVIDIA, a prominent player in the GPU space is one of the top choices for most stakeholders in the field. Nvidia takes their commitment to the space a step ahead with the launch of the GPU Operator open-source project at Mobile World Congress LA.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 601

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 601 for the week of October 13th – 19th, 2019.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Ohio Linux Fest, GNU World Order and Extras

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Audio capture in Linux on Chromebooks testing about to begin in Chrome OS

Filed under
OS
Linux

I may be one of the few that wants to record audio using a Linux app on my Chromebook, but I’m going to share this news anyway. The effort to bring audio capture support to Project Crostini that started in February is nearly ready for testing, at least on a limited basis.

’ve tried to start my conainer with the new –enable-audio-capture argument using the Dev Channel of Chrome OS 79 but the extra parameter isn’t yet recognized. Hopefully, it arrives in the next Dev Channel update for Chrome OS.

My specific need for audio capture is when using Audacity, an open-source audio editing tool available for Linux, as well as Windows and macOS.

Read more

Alpine 3.10.3 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.10.3 of its Alpine Linux operating system.

Read more

Games: vkBasalt, Ikey Doherty, Crusader Kings II, Sunless Skies

Filed under
Gaming
  • vkBasalt, an open source Vulkan post processing layer for Contrast Adaptive Sharpening

    This is an interesting open source project! vkBasalt is a new Vulkan post processing layer that currently supports Contrast Adaptive Sharpening.

    Unlike Radeon Image Sharpening, vkBasalt supports Linux and works with both NVIDIA and AMD. This isn't entirely reinventing the wheel though, as it's partly based upon the ReShade port of AMD's CAS. Still, it's fun to see what hackers are able to do with little layers like this, especially when we don't have official support.

  • Ikey Doherty Launches Open-Source Focused Game/Software Development Company

    Well known open-source figure Ikey Doherty who rose to prominence for his work on the Solus Linux distribution and then went on to work on Intel's Clear Linux project is now having his hand at game engine development.

    Ikey shared with us that he left Intel back in May to begin his new adventure: Lispy Snake. Lispy Snake is a UK software development firm that at least initially is working on a game engine and games. Given Ikey's experience, the firm is focused on leveraging open-source technologies.

  • After making Crusader Kings II free, Paradox are now giving away The Old Gods expansion

    It's been a bit of a whirlwind of Paradox news recently and we have even more to share. With a tiny amount of effort, you can get The Old Gods expansion for Crusader Kings II free.

    This is after Crusader Kings II was set free to play and Crusader Kings III was announced just like I suggested it would be.

  • Failbetter Games are upgrading owners of Sunless Skies to the Sovereign Edition next year

    Failbetter Games have announced that Sunless Skies is getting a bit of an upgrade with the Sovereign Edition and it's going to be free to existing purchasers when it's release next year.

    Part of the reason, is that it will be releasing on Consoles so they're polishing the experience up some more. It's not just a special console edition though, it's coming with a bunch of new content and various improvements to the flow of it. To release on PC at the same time as Consoles, free for existing players.

What To Do After Installing Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine

Filed under
Ubuntu

In this traditional article special for Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine you will find my suggestions and recommendations in 3 parts, work (including date/time adjustments, productivity tools), non-work (including extensions, podcasts, RSS, codecs), and system maintenance (including CPU-X, repository setup, auto-backup). I also have suggestion for you wanting Global Menu on this Eoan Ermine OS at the end. Adjust it once and use freely everyday. Finally, I hope Ubuntu 19.10 will be your best tool you could imagine to use without worry. Happy working!

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Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Pylint: Making your Python code consistent

    Pylint is a higher-level Python style enforcer. While flake8 and black will take care of "local" style: where the newlines occur, how comments are formatted, or find issues like commented out code or bad practices in log formatting.

    Pylint is extremely aggressive by default. It will offer strong opinions on everything from checking if declared interfaces are actually implemented to opportunities to refactor duplicate code, which can be a lot to a new user. One way of introducing it gently to a project, or a team, is to start by turning all checkers off, and then enabling checkers one by one. This is especially useful if you already use flake8, black, and mypy: Pylint has quite a few checkers that overlap in functionality.

  • PyDev of the Week: Sophy Wong

    This week we welcome Sophy Wong (@sophywong) as our PyDev of the Week! Sophy is a maker who uses Circuit Python for creating wearables. She is also a writer and speaker at Maker events. You can see some of her creations on her Youtube Channel or her website. Let’s take a few moments to get to know her better!

  • Erik Marsja: Converting HTML to a Jupyter Notebook

    In this short post, we are going to learn how to turn the code from blog posts to Jupyter notebooks.

Proper Linux Screen Sharing Coming to Chromium & Electron Apps like Discord

Filed under
Linux

A patch to add ‘screen enumeration’ to the Chromium browser is currently pending merge upstream.

Once this fix is accepted Chromium and Chromium-based apps (like Discord) will finally support full screen sharing on Linux in a manner similar to that on Windows and macOS.

Not being a multi-monitor user, or someone who shares their screen often, I wasn’t aware of this particular limitation until recently.

So I’ll explain.

Read more

Firefox 70 Is Now Available to Download with Fresh New Look, Extended Dark Mode

Filed under
Moz/FF

Judging by the version number, you would think that Firefox 70 is a massive update to the open-source and cross-platform web browser built by Mozilla, but it's not really a major release. However, it does bring some a fresh new look for its icon, new welcome screen, and an extended dark mode for the built-in pages.

So the first thing you'll notice after installing Firefox 70, which you can download right now for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, it's the new Firefox icon that was unveiled by Mozilla a few months ago. In addition, you'll notice that all of Firefox's built-in pages now follows the system dark mode preference and a new welcome screen will help you setup Firefox faster.

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KDevelop 5.4.3 released

Filed under
KDE

We today provide a stabilization and bugfix release with version 5.4.3. This is a bugfix-only release, which introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using a previous version of KDevelop 5.4.

You can find the updated Linux AppImage as well as the source code archives on our download page.

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AAB Support in Qt for Android

Filed under
Android
KDE

Starting with Qt 5.14.0 beta2, users will notice that there are a lot fewer Qt for Android distributions than in previous versions. But don't panic: All the usual target architectures are still available! Instead of distributing a single package for each target ABI, we now have one larger package that covers all the ones we support: arm64-v8a, armv7a, x86 and x86-64.

For users building from source, the new default is also to build for all target ABIs in one go.

The reason for this is that Google Play is moving away from requiring the upload of multiple publisher-signed APK packages. Instead, the recommended form of distribution now is the new AAB format: An unsigned package that contains all supported target ABIs in one. Based on this, the app store will generate signed APKs that are suitable and optimized for the device issuing the request.

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Linux-powered NVR system offers up to eight PoE+ ports

Filed under
Linux

SolidRun’s rugged “ClearFog GTR A385” NVR system runs Linux on a Marvell Armada A385 and offers 4x 90W PoE++ or 8x 30W PoE+ camera ports plus powered GbE PoE WAN and 2.5Gbps SFP+ ports, 3x mini-PCIe, and optional 2x SATA.

SolidRun announced a fanless network video recorder for indoor or outdoor surveillance and industrial infrastructure applications. The ClearFog GTR A385 is available in an unpriced S4 model and a $345 L8 model. Both provide 4x PoE++ Gigabit Ethernet ports for 90W Power-over-Ethernet control of cameras. The L8 model provides four more GbE/PoE ports that can be configured with the first four ports to alternatively support 8x 30W PoE+ (802.3bt) connections. All the ports are 802.3at/af/bt-compliant power sourcing equipment (PSE) ports with up to type 4 PoE support.

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Manjaro Linux 18.1.0 Juhraya Cinnamon - Spicy but sweet

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

You know how the popular saying goes. When it rains ... people drive slowly just to annoy you. But as it happens, I received a bunch of emails from people asking me two things: 1) Why have I not recently done any more Cinnamon reviews (other than Mint)? 2) When am I going to review the latest version of Manjaro 18.1 Juhraya?

The answer to these question is: yes. At the same time! I decided to try Manjaro Cinnamon, not something I've done before, so it should be an interesting, refreshing and hopefully worthwhile exercise. The test box will be the same one I used for the Illyria Xfce test, so we can compare things in earnest - and accurately. This is an eight-book mixed Windows & Linux box, and it comes with UEFI, Intel graphics, 16 sweet partitions, and another instance of Manjaro that we won't touch in this review. Begin to start.

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Pacman 5.2 Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We have a clear winner. Although I’m sure that at least half of those are in responses to bugs he created! He claims it is a much smaller proportion… And a new contributor in third.

What has changed in this release? Nothing super exciting as far as I’m concerned, but check out the detailed list here.

We have completely removed support for delta packages. This was a massively underused feature, usually made updates slower for a slight saving on bandwidth, and had a massive security hole. Essentially, a malicious package database in combination with delta packages could run arbitrary commands on your system. This would be less of an issue if a certain Linux distro signed their package databases… Anyway, on balance I judged it better to remove this feature altogether. We may come back to this in the future with a different implementation, but I would not expect that any time soon. Note a similar vulnerability was found with using XferCommand to download packages, but we plugged that hole instead of removing it!

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More in Tux Machines

Events: Cloud Foundry Summit, OpenSUSE Asia and FSFE System Hackers

  • The Importance of Culture in Software Development

    A few weeks ago at Cloud Foundry Summit, I had the chance to grab a few of our partners and talk about how culture plays a part in the software development process. While appropriate tools are very important, it is only part of the story. Culture will make or break any change initiative regardless of how amazing our technology is.

  • openSUSE Asia Summit

    I met Edwin and Ary earlier this year at the openSUSE Conference in Nuremberg. They invited me to come to the openSUSE Asia Summit happening in Bali. I wasn't sure that I would be able to attend it. But then, around June I saw a tweet reminding about the deadline for the Call for Proposal for the openSUSE Asia Summit and I thought maybe I should give it a try. I submitted a workshop proposal on MicroOS and a lightning talk proposal to the openSUSE Asia CFP team. Both were accepted and I couldn't be happier. It gave me the chance to meet friends from the openSUSE community again, learn and share more. We do not have direct flights to Indonesia. I traveled through Air Mauritius to Kuala Lumpur and then Malaysia Arlines to Denpasar, Bali. I spent almost 24 hours traveling before reaching my hotel in Jimbaran. I was totally knackered when I arrived but the enthusiasm of being there for the summit was stronger than anything. I booked a taxi through Traveloka ahead of my arrival in Bali. It was recommended by Edwin. When I compared other taxi fares I felt glad I booked it online. I also bought a SIM card on my way to the hotel with a 6GB data package. I knew we'd all communicate mostly on Telegram, just as we did for oSC 2019. My hotel WiFi connection wasn't great but I was impressed by the 4G coverage of my mobile Internet provider, XL Axiata. Mobile connectivity was extremely helpful as I would rely on GoJek car-hailing for the next few days.

  • The 3rd FSFE System Hackers hackathon

    On 10 and 11 October, the FSFE System Hackers met in person to tackle problems and new features regarding the servers and services the FSFE is running. The team consists of dedicated volunteers who ensure that the community and staff can work effectively. The recent meeting built on the great work of the past 2 years which have been shaped by large personal and technical changes. The System Hackers are responsible for the maintenance and development of a large number of services. From the fsfe.org website’s deployment to the mail servers and blogs, from Git to internal services like DNS and monitoring, all these services, virtual machines and physical servers are handled by this friendly group that is always looking forward to welcoming new members.

GNU Parallel Released and 10 Years of GNU Health

  • GNU Parallel 20191022 ('Driving IT') released [stable]

    GNU Parallel 20191022 ('Driving IT') [stable] has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/ No new functionality was introduced so this is a good candidate for a stable release. GNU Parallel is 10 years old next year on 2020-04-22. You are here by invited to a reception on Friday 2020-04-17.

  • GNU Health: 10 years of Freedom and Equity in Healthcare

    I am back from my trip to India, where I spent a week with the team of All India Institute of Medical Sciences – AIIMS –, the largest public hospital in Asia and a leading research institution. They have taken the decision to adopt GNU Health, the Free Hospital and Health Information System. One key aspect in Free Software is ownership. From the moment they adopted GNU Health, it now also belongs to AIIMS. They have full control over it. They can download and upgrade the system; access the source code; customize it to fit their needs; and contribute back to the community. This is the definition of Free Software. The definition of Free Software is universal. GNU Health is equally valid for very large institutions, national public health networks and small, rural or primary care centers. The essence is the same.

Programming Leftovers

  • NumFOCUS and Tidelift partner to support essential community-led open source data science and scientific computing projects

    NumFOCUS and Tidelift today announced a partnership to support open source libraries critical to the Python data science and scientific computing ecosystem. NumPy, SciPy, and pandas—sponsored projects within NumFOCUS—are now part of the Tidelift Subscription. Working in collaboration with NumFOCUS, Tidelift financially supports the work of project maintainers to provide ongoing security updates, maintenance and code improvements, licensing verification and indemnification, and more to enterprise engineering and data science teams via a managed open source subscription from Tidelift.

  • Python Plotting With Matplotlib

    A picture is worth a thousand words, and with Python’s matplotlib library, it fortunately takes far less than a thousand words of code to create a production-quality graphic. However, matplotlib is also a massive library, and getting a plot to look just right is often achieved through trial and error. Using one-liners to generate basic plots in matplotlib is relatively simple, but skillfully commanding the remaining 98% of the library can be daunting.

  • Nominations for 2019 Malcolm Tredinnick Memorial Prize

    Malcolm was an early core contributor to Django and had both a huge influence and large impact on Django as we know it today. Besides being knowledgeable he was also especially friendly to new users and contributors. He exemplified what it means to be an amazing Open Source contributor. We still miss him. The DSF Prize page summarizes the prize nicely: The Malcolm Tredinnick Memorial Prize is a monetary prize, awarded annually, to the person who best exemplifies the spirit of Malcolm’s work - someone who welcomes, supports and nurtures newcomers; freely gives feedback and assistance to others, and helps to grow the community. The hope is that the recipient of the award will use the award stipend as a contribution to travel to a community event -- a DjangoCon, a PyCon, a sprint -- and continue in Malcolm’s footsteps.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: pkgKitten 0.1.5: Creating R Packages that purr

    This release provides a few small changes. The default per-package manual page now benefits from a second refinement (building on what was introduced in the 0.1.4 release) in using the Rd macros referring to the DESCRIPTION file rather than duplicating information. Several pull requests fixes sloppy typing in the README.md, NEWS.Rd or manual page—thanks to all contributors for fixing these. Details below.

Commitment To Elevating The Very Best

OSI applauds the efforts of every individual who has ever spoken up and taken steps to make free, libre, and open source software communities more inclusive. Without you, the movement would be less vibrant, less welcoming, and irreversibly diminished. Whether you’ve led your community to implement a code of conduct or taken the time to mentor someone who isn’t like you, whether you’ve reported toxic behavior or pressured community leaders to act: thank you. It takes courage to change the status quo, and all too often, that comes at a personal expense. Ultimately, ours is a moral movement, and our integrity hinges on whether we rise to meet the challenge of seeking justice and equity for all. As we move forward, we hope that we can learn as a community and incorporate the lessons of the past into building a better future. Further, we hope we can build bridges to those who have been shut out of our movement, whether by omission or commission, at the hands of systemic bias as well as toxic and predatory behavior. As the saying goes in open source, “Many eyes lead to shallower bugs.” So too do many perspectives lead to better software. Here’s to a better, more inclusive tomorrow. - The OSI Board of Directors Read more