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Sunday, 25 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry A Fishy Tale harshasrisri 01/05/2011 - 2:11pm
Blog entry storming srlinuxx 2 27/04/2011 - 6:05am
Blog entry Downtime srlinuxx 1 21/04/2011 - 10:28pm
Blog entry Gnome3 is a YES revdjenk 08/04/2011 - 12:27pm
Blog entry Mageia 1 Alpha2 -- A Status Report gfranken 27/03/2011 - 3:59am
Blog entry Looking for help to bring a new app to the world bigbearomaha 09/03/2011 - 1:35pm
Blog entry motherboard srlinuxx 2 06/03/2011 - 6:32pm
Blog entry More Hardware troubles srlinuxx 03/03/2011 - 9:19pm
Blog entry PCLinuxOS on the BBC Texstar 1 03/03/2011 - 9:51pm
Blog entry weirdness: puppy & wd-40 srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:07am

Quick Guide to The Awesome GNOME Disk Utility

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME Disk Utility is an awesome tool to maintain hard disk drives that shipped with Ubuntu. It's called simply "Disks" on start menu on 19.04, anyway. It's able to format hard disks and USB sticks, create and remove partitions, rename partitions, and check disk health. Not only that, it also features writing ISO into disk and vice versa, create ISO image of a disk. This tutorial explains in brief how to use it for 8 purposes. Let's go!

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LibreOffice 6.3 - Waiting for a miracle

Filed under
LibO
Reviews

LibreOffice 6.3 is a powerful, rich office suite, and the fact it comes with no strings attached, the string to your purse included, is a commendable thing. But it is not enough. Simply isn't. Functionality is what matters, and if the program cannot satisfy the necessary needs, it's not really useful. Maybe on the scale of un-value, it's less un-valuable than something that costs a lot of money, but you still don't get what you require.

And in this regard, LibreOffice 6.3 doesn't quite cut it. I mean, you can still use it happily - I know I will, it does an okay job, and you can create files and export to PDF and all that. But then, working with Office files is pretty much a no-go, the style management is inefficient, and the UI layouts are somewhat clunky. I also feel the momentum has slowed, and the great, amazing hope that was there when LibreOffice was born is just a thing of mildly apathetic momentum now. True, this ailment grips the entire open-source world, and Linux in particular, but it doesn't change the fact that the hope is slowly dwindling. All in all, worth testing, but a solution to all office problems, LibreOffice 6.3 ain't.

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AMD Ryzen 5 3400G Is Working Well On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

AMD Raven Ridge APUs were a rough launch particularly on Linux where even with the latest motherboard BIOS updates and Linux kernel I am still hitting occasional stability issues, so when the opportunity arose recently to try out the Ryzen 5 3400G as the successor in the Picasso family, I was interested. Fortunately, AMD Picasso APUs have proven to be in better shape on Linux so here is the initial round of performance tests for those interested in the AMD Linux performance on Ubuntu.

The Ryzen 5 3400G is a $150 USD APU and while launched alongside the new Zen 2 CPUs, the Ryzen 3000 series APUs are in fact based on Zen+ and using Vega graphics. The Ryzen 5 3400G features four cores / eight threads with a 3.7GHz base frequency and 4.2GHz turbo frequency. On the graphics side are Radeon RX Vega 11 graphics that clock up to 1.4GHz as a nice boost over the Ryzen 5 2400G. This AM4 APU has a 65 Watt TDP for this highest-performing Picasso socketed APU.

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Linux on your laptop: A closer look at EFI boot options

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

For some time now I have gotten a slow but steady volume of requests that I write about UEFI firmware and EFI boot relative to installing and maintaining Linux. As a result of a casual comment I made in a recent post about installing Linux on a new laptop, the volume has gone up considerably.

So in this post I will review and explain some of what I consider to be the most important points about UEFI firmware and Linux systems. I intend for this to be a relatively short post, but once I get started you never know... so you might want to get a cup of coffee before starting to read.

First, the specific aspect of UEFI firmware that I am concerned with here is the boot sequence, and how to use it with Linux. There is a lot more to UEFI (EFI) than that, but I will not be addressing any of that here.

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Programming: PyCharm, PyCon, GitLab and Parallelised Execution

  • PyCharm 2019.2.1

    PyCharm 2019.2.1 is available now!

  • Proud to be sponsoring PyCon 2020

    I’m delighted to announce that Weekly Python Exercise is a gold sponsor of PyCon 2020, to be held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. PyCon is the largest Python conference in the world, and is both fun and interesting for Python developers of all experience levels and backgrounds.

  • GitLab 12.2 arrives with faster pipelines & design management strategy

    The monthly GitLab update has arrived, right on time and with new features and capabilities. Take a look inside and see some of the newest highlights for version 12.2. This month introduces faster, more efficient pipelines, cross project merge request dependencies, performance upgrades, a new Design Management, and a few more goodies.
    The latest version of GitLab is right on time, with new updates, new features for members, and more. Welcome to version 12.2.

    New to GitLab and unsure of how it stacks up against other commonly used tools? Check out the comparison between GitLab and the rest of the DevOps tools landscape to see how it has grown and how it compares to similar tools. Potentially, it could replace certain tool functionalities included in Jenkins, Docker Hub, GitHub, and more.

  • Parallel CPU Microcode Updates Being Restored To Help Large Core Count Servers

    Following Spectre/Meltdown, the Linux CPU microcode updating was made serial while now a new patch pending for the Linux kernel would restore the behavior to be parallelized in order to speed-up the process for large core count servers.

    Handling parallel CPU microcode updates can make a meaningful difference on today's large core count systems. An Oracle engineer has volleyed a patch from an Intel developer in trying to get the code into the mainline kernel.

Clear Linux launches Deep Learning Reference Stack 4.0 that enhances AI performance

Filed under
Linux

With the growing number of AI-based developers, Clear Linux Project shifts its focus towards Deep Learning as it releases Deep Learning Reference Stack 4.0.

The brains behind Clear Linux Project, namely Intel, acknowledges the significance of Artificial Intelligence and how rapidly it has been evolving as of late. Accordingly, the company vows to accelerate enterprise and ecosystem development to take DL (Deep Learning) workloads to the next level. As a part of this mission, Intel introduced an integrated Deep Learning Reference Stack, whose new version arrived earlier this week.

This stack is mainly aimed at the Deep Learning facet of Artificial Intelligence and performs well on the Intel® Xeon® Scalable series of processors.

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Graphics: Intel, NVIDIA, AMDGPU

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Submits Final Batch Of Graphics Driver Changes For Linux 5.4 - Growing Tiger Lake

    After having been submitting various feature updates to DRM-Next the past few weeks of new graphics driver feature code to introduce in Linux 5.4, a final pull request was sent in today with the remaining feature work slated for this next version of the Linux kernel.

    As added earlier to Linux 5.4, the big focus at this stage for the open-source Intel Linux developers is on bringing up the "Gen 12" graphics support for Tiger Lake. With the Icelake / Gen 11 graphics support now in good shape, the developers have already been busy plumbing Gen 12 graphics that are at least a year out from being available through retail channels.

  • Nouveau's Changes Sent Out For Linux 5.4 In Fixing Up The Open-Source NVIDIA Support

    While NVIDIA recently began publishing more hardware documentation, don't expect it to make an immediate difference in the quality of the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver. Today the pull request was sent to DRM-Next of the Nouveau kernel driver changes for the upcoming Linux 5.4 cycle and there isn't much to get excited about.

    Nouveau DRM maintainer Ben Skeggs of Red Hat sent in the pull request this morning, which mostly consists of work that missed out on the current Linux 5.3 cycle when he sent in that earlier pull request too late. This time the pull request is on-time and has the improvements to color management, some code for acknowledging when any PCIe power cables are not connected, and different fixes. But for end-users, nothing to get excited about unless any of the bug fixes had affected problems you experienced.

  • AMDGPU To Allow Memory Re-Clocking Soon For Multi-Monitor Setups

    Currently the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver doesn't automatically adjust the video memory clock speeds when running a multi-monitor setup since it's more complicated to gracefully handle when scanning out to two or more displays. But a set of currently experimental patches will allow memory clock switching support on multi-monitor setups with the AMDGPU DC code.

Linux Virtual Machine App GNOME Boxes Has An Awesome Time-Saving Feature You Should Know About

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Not only did GNOME Boxes automatically detect that the ISO contained Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, it offered me an Express Install option (provided I had a working internet connection). The app automatically pulled my username into the account field, and asked that I do nothing more than enter a password to proceed.

And that was truly all that it required, unless I needed to customize the amount of RAM and disk space allocated to the VM.

After hitting the Continue button, GNOME Boxes ran an unattended installation. It pulled regional and language settings from my host machine, handled the partitioning dialogue, and everything else. The installation screens zoomed by, components and updates were downloaded, and within less than 5 minutes I had a perfectly working Ubuntu 18.04 to play with.

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A Look at Redcore Linux: Gentoo based Linux Distribution

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Reviews

Many people in the technology world have heard, at least in passing, of the Linux distribution Gentoo. Gentoo is one of the most famous distributions to the point of becoming a joke; with it’s complexity and depth, installing Gentoo has been a daunting task for many.

Redcore is one of the latest distributions to attempt to bring the power of Gentoo to the everyday user.

I previously wrote an article in 2017 about Sabayon Linux, another popular Gentoo based system; but Redcore Linux holds its own and pulls its own weight.

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6 Best Log Management Tools For Linux in 2019

Filed under
Server
Software

Before we can talk about log management, let’s define what a log is. Simply defined, a log is the automatically-produced and time-stamped documentation of an event relevant to a particular system. In other words, whenever an event takes place on a system, a log is generated. Systems and devices will generate logs for different types of events and many systems give administrators some degree of control over which event generates a log and which doesn’t.

As for log management, It is simply referring to the processes and policies used to administer and facilitate the generation, transmission, analysis, storage, archiving and eventual disposal of large volumes of log data. Although not clearly stated, log management implies a centralized system where logs from multiple sources are collected. Log management is not just log collection, though. It is the management part which is the most important. And log management systems often have multiple functionalities, collecting logs being just one of them.

Once logs are received by the log management system, they need to be standardized into a common format as different systems format logs differently and include different data. Some start a log with the date and time, some start it with an event number. Some only include an event ID while others include a full-text description of the event. One of the purposes of log management systems is to ensure that all collected log entries are stored in a uniform format. This will event correlation and eventual searching much easier down the line.

Even correlation and searching are two additional major functions of several log management systems. The best of them feature a powerful search engine that allows administrators to zero-in on precisely what they need. Correlation functions will automatically group related events, even if they are from different sources. How—and how successfully—different log management system accomplish that is a major differentiating factor.

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Games: VKD3D, Smach Z and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Supergiant Games is turning ten years old, big sale on their games and HADES is heading to Steam

    Supergiant Games, the team behind hits like Bastion and Transistor are turning ten years old as a studio and so they're doing a big sale. HADES will also no longer be exclusive to the Epic Store this year.

    First up, the sales!

    Over on Steam, you can pick up the entire collection of Bastion, Transistor and Pyre plus soundtracks with 78% off together. An absolutely incredible deal!

    All their games are also on sale in a bundle and by themselves on itch.io for those who prefer it.

  • Valve's Proton To Begin Shipping VKD3D For Direct3D 12 Over Vulkan

    While VKD3D continues to be under heavy development, Valve already appears pleased with it enough that it's now being built as part of their Wine-based Proton software for powering Steam Play on Linux.

    VKD3D is the official Wine project being worked on for accelerating Direct3D 12 over Vulkan. This has been Wine's only pursued D3D12 approach with Direct3D 12 not mapping nicely over OpenGL and thus not fitting well into their existing WineD3D code. VKD3D has been able to run a few games, but at last check not many though that may be different these days with it already being included into Proton.

  • Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition has a new DLC out with Tyrants of the Moonsea

    Looking for your next adventure? Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition just got even bigger with a new "premium module" DLC Tyrants of the Moonsea now available.

    For this new expansion, Beamdog teamed up with Ossian Studios. For those unfamiliar, Ossian Studios was formed in 2003 to work on new role-playing games with previous releases including Darkness over Daggerford and Mysteries of Westgate.

    Tyrants of the Moonsea is based on a previously cancelled expansion from Luke Scull, with the Enhanced Edition release boasting "70% more story and gameplay, as well as a large amount of new art and audio content".

  • Space colony building sim Space Haven has a third Alpha release out now

    Space Haven from Bugbyte Ltd continues being shaped into something special, with a third Alpha version now available for this unique colony building sim.

    The latest update overhauls a bunch of the resources in the game, along with adding in 7 new resource production facilities. They said the purpose of this, is to give them a better foundation to build on and give the game some more depth over time.

    While the main focus of this release was on the resources, one other major addition made it in. Players have been asking for a more sandbox-like mode, so they added the ability to create a scenario giving you tons of resources and a crew of 8. This way, you can focus more on building up your fleet of ships right away. Also a good place to test out some ship designs.

  • Looks like the Smach Z handheld gaming unit is getting an upgrade

    The Smach Z team attended this year's Gamescom and is appears they're not done tweaking this gaming handheld.

    While all their current units available for pre-order house the AMD Ryzen V1605B and Radeon Vega 8 Graphics, they've taken it a step further to show off a more powerful Smach Z with the AMD Ryzen V1807B with Radeon Vega 11 Graphics. Not just that, it seems the max storage has been boosted up to 480GB and RAM up to 32GB. Overall, it seems like a pretty nice upgrade.

  • Valve tease a new Dota 2 hero named Snapfire with an animated short

    Snapfire is the name and Dota 2 is the game! Valve have teased a new bad-ass female hero in a wild west themed animated short.

  • Some more thoughts on Ion Fury, the FPS from Voidpoint and 3D Realms

    Ion Fury (previously Ion Maiden) is true example of how you really don’t need to push graphics ever closer to realism to achieve something ridiculously good.

    Developed by Voidpoint and 3D Realms, using the Build game engine which powered some other classics like Duke Nukem 3D, Blood and Shadow Warrior it released recently with same-day Linux support showing others how it’s done. While it’s retro in many ways, there is of course a vast amount of modern touches like improved physics and map interactions, auto-saves, being able to actually do a headshot, higher resolution support and so on.

    Here’s the thing, I grew up with games like Duke and I’ve seen gaming progress from the Amiga to where we are now. There came a point, where I grew massively tired of retro-inspired flashbacks and in some ways I am still tired of it. However, Ion Fury is a very different sort of brew. The best thing about Ion Fury is that it might seem like other classics but it has a different and refreshing feel to it.

3 Best MS Paint Alternative Drawing Programs for Ubuntu/Linux

Filed under
Linux

For a quick drawing, editing images - MS Paint type applications are essential. Here are three of them which are similar and can be used for quick drawing/editing in Linux and Ubuntu systems. These 3 MS Paint alternative drawing programs are best fit for general users and as well as professionals who needs a quick and fast edit on images or create drawings.

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Hardware: Allwinner Processors, Intel SoC and RISC-V

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • 7 Excellent R Natural Language Processing Tools

    Natural language processing (NLP) is a set of techniques for using computers to detect in human language the kinds of things that humans detect automatically.

    NLP is an exciting field of computer science, artificial intelligence, and computational linguistics concerned with the interactions between computers and human (natural) languages. It includes word and sentence tokenization, text classification and sentiment analysis, spelling correction, information extraction, parsing, meaning extraction, and question answering.

    In our formative years, we master the basics of spoken and written language. However, the vast majority of us do not progress past some basic processing rules when we learn how to handle text in our applications. Yet unstructured software comprises the majority of the data we see. NLP is the technology for dealing with our all-pervasive product: human language, as it appears in social media, emails, web pages, tweets, product descriptions, newspaper stories, and scientific articles, in thousands of languages and variants.

  • A muggle's guide to AWK arrays: 3

    Part 2 in this series looked at the 2-file command structure, where the first part of an AWK command created an array based on the first file, and the second part of the command used the array to filter a second file.

    Another way to think about this command structure is that an AWK array is like a lookup table, held in memory. You can use that lookup table for different kinds of data operations on another file. In this post I'll demonstrate reformatting and table joining.

  • Doing Math with Python in Python Humble Bundle

    "Doing Math with Python" is part of No Starch Press's Python Humble Bundle.

  • Kushal Das: A new tool to render my blog

    Now, I think it worked for me. I could focus on writing the actual content of the posts than anything else. The tool has a few flaws, but, none of them had any issue with my blogging requirements. It just worked for me. I could have written it in Python (in much less time), but, learning a new language is always fun.

The Linux kernel: Top 5 innovations

Filed under
Linux

The word innovation gets bandied about in the tech industry almost as much as revolution, so it can be difficult to differentiate hyperbole from something that’s actually exciting. The Linux kernel has been called innovative, but then again it’s also been called the biggest hack in modern computing, a monolith in a micro world.

Setting aside marketing and modeling, Linux is arguably the most popular kernel of the open source world, and it’s introduced some real game-changers over its nearly 30-year life span.

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Removing Qt 4 from Ubuntu before the 20.04 release

Filed under
Ubuntu

I would like to completely remove Qt 4 from the Ubuntu archive before
the 20.04 release. This includes all of KDE 4 and dependencies.

The Debian Qt/KDE Team (which I am a part of) is raising the status of
the Qt 4 removal bugs to RC[1], and since the Qt 6 work is starting
upstream in the dev branch in the coming months, now is the time for Qt
4 to go.

My timeline for this is to change all of the bugs filed to ask people to
port[2] to removal bugs, and go over the list of Qt 4 reverse
dependencies one last time, so the removal can be done at the beginning
of the 20.04 cycle before the archive opens. This would make 19.10 the
last release with Qt 4.

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Also: Ubuntu Planning To Drop Qt4 & Its Dependencies Ahead Of 20.04 LTS

The lifecycle of Linux kernel testing

Filed under
Linux

In Continuous integration testing for the Linux kernel, I wrote about the Continuous Kernel Integration (CKI) project and its mission to change how kernel developers and maintainers work. This article is a deep dive into some of the more technical aspects of the project and how all the pieces fit together.

Every exciting feature, improvement, and bug in the kernel starts with a change proposed by a developer. These changes appear on myriad mailing lists for different kernel repositories. Some repositories focus on certain subsystems in the kernel, such as storage or networking, while others focus on broad aspects of the kernel. The CKI project springs into action when developers propose a change, or patchset, to the kernel or when a maintainer makes changes in the repository itself.

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