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Wednesday, 08 Apr 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry A Fishy Tale harshasrisri 01/05/2011 - 2:11pm
Blog entry storming srlinuxx 2 27/04/2011 - 6:05am
Blog entry Downtime srlinuxx 1 21/04/2011 - 10:28pm
Blog entry Gnome3 is a YES revdjenk 08/04/2011 - 12:27pm
Blog entry Mageia 1 Alpha2 -- A Status Report gfranken 27/03/2011 - 3:59am
Blog entry Looking for help to bring a new app to the world bigbearomaha 09/03/2011 - 1:35pm
Blog entry motherboard srlinuxx 2 06/03/2011 - 6:32pm
Blog entry More Hardware troubles srlinuxx 03/03/2011 - 9:19pm
Blog entry PCLinuxOS on the BBC Texstar 1 03/03/2011 - 9:51pm
Blog entry weirdness: puppy & wd-40 srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:07am

Debian: ledger2beancount, Reproducible Builds and Debian Project Leader Race

Filed under
Debian
  • Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.1 released

    I released version 2.1 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter.

  • Reproducible Builds in March 2020

    Welcome to the March 2020 report from the Reproducible Builds project. In our reports we outline the most important things that we have been up to over the past month and some plans for the future.

  • Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities for 2020-03

    On the 12th of March, I posted my self-nomination for the Debian Project Leader election. This is the second time I’m running for DPL, and you can read my platform here. The campaign period covered the second half of the month, where I answered a bunch of questions on the debian-vote list. The voting period is currently open and ends on 18 April.

    [...]

    At DebConf19 I wanted to ramp up the efforts to make a Debian PeerTube instance a reality. I spoke to many people about this and discovered that some Debianites are already making all kinds of Debian videos in many different languages. Some were even distributing them locally on DVD and have never uploaded them. I thought that the Debian PeerTube instance could not only be a good platform for DebConf videos, but it could be a good home for many free software content creators, especially if they create Debian specific content. I spoke to Rhonda about it, who’s generally interested in the Fediverse and wanted to host a instances of Pleroma (microblogging service) and PixelFed (free image hosting service that resembles the Instagram site), but needed a place to host them. We decided to combine efforts, and since a very large amount of fediverse services end with .social in their domain names, we ended up calling this project Debian Social. We’re also hosting some non-fediverse services like a WordPress multisite and a Jitsi instance for video chatting.

Programming: Perl and More

Filed under
Development
  • 2020.14 More perspectives

    Andrew Shitov has even been more busy than the past weeks. Apart from adding more and more views to the Covid-19 Observer, so many that there’s now an impressive “What’s new” page. But Andrew didn’t stop at that: an article on Perl.com titled “Observing Coronavirus Pandemic with Raku” (/r/perl comments) explains to the readers how some of the unique features of Raku were applied in processing all of the data. And in the meantime Andrew still found time to publish Chapter 7 of their compiler book.

  • Dancer2 0.300001 Released

    On behalf of the Dancer Core Team, I’d like to announce the availability of Dancer2 0.300001. This maintenance release brings brings a revamped tutorial, fixing of a YAML-related regression, repair of an encoding bug, and a slew of documentation fixes.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 054: Kth Permutation Sequence + Collatz Conjecture
  • You Need To Stop Using HTML Email

    We need to change this norm from the ground up as a grass roots effort. We'll never convince Gmail and others to automatically display emails in plain text for all users. Nor will we convince companies to stop sending HTML emails to their clients. The only way is to start sending plain text emails and setting up our email programs to only display our received emails as plain text.

    As more and more people do this the companies will begin to follow suite due the increasing number of people being unable to easily read their messages.

    It's also our duty as good email users to only every send emails as plain text because we can not always be sure that the receiver of our emails is using a program that will render out all the HTML instead of displaying it as a webpage.

    Keep in mind that by plain text I don't mean you should not encrypt your emails. If you need to encrypt them then please do; PGP and GPG work very well. When sending an encrypted message; type up your message, encrypt it, and the paste the encrypted output into the email as plain text.

  • Safer SSH agent forwarding

    As mentioned, a better alternative is to use the jump host feature: the SSH connection to the target host is tunneled through the SSH connection to the jump host. See the manual page and this blog post for more details.

    If you really need to use SSH agent forwarding, you can secure it a bit through a dedicated agent with two main attributes:

    it holds only the private key to connect to the target host, and

    it asks confirmation for each requested signature.

  • LLVM's Flang/F18 Fortran Compiler Might Be Back On Track For Merging Soon

    Since the "f18" open-source Fortran compiler front-end was approved last year for merging as the newest LLVM sub-project and using the Flang name, there have been a number of false starts in getting the code merged. This year alone Flang had multiple delays and cancelled merge plans as the developers worked to get the code ready for upstream. Now though it looks like it could be ready to cross that long sought after milestone for having an in-tree Fortran front-end.

    Richard Barton announced today that the team now believes F18 is ready to be merged. There still are some open items still being worked on, but should be easily resolved after the F18 code is within the tree as the new "Flang" compiler.

  • A Telegram bot in Haskell on Amazon Lambda

    So instead adding layers and complexities, can I solve this instead my making things simpler? If I compiler my bootstrap into a static Linux binary, it should run on any Linux, including Amazon Linux.

    [...]

    I am mostly happy with this setup: My game is now available to more people in more ways. I don’t have to maintain any infrastructure. When nobody is using this bot no resources are wasted, and the costs of the service are neglectible -- this is unlikely to go beyond the free tier, and even if it would, the cost per generated image is roughly USD 0.000021.

    There is one slight disappointment, though. What I find most intersting about Kaleidogen from a technical point of view is that when you play it in the browser, the images are not generated by my code. Instead, my code creates a WebGL shader program on the fly, and that program generates the image on your graphics card.

  • Cambridge Computing Education Research Symposium – recap of our online event
  • Digital Making at Home: Storytelling with code

Linux 5.6 I/O Scheduler Benchmarks: None, Kyber, BFQ, MQ-Deadline

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While some Linux distributions are still using MQ-Deadline or Kyber by default for NVMe SSD storage, using no I/O scheduler still tends to perform the best overall for this speedy storage medium.

In curious about the current state of the I/O schedulers with the newly-minted Linux 5.6 kernel, here are benchmarks of no I/O scheduler against MQ-Deadline, Kyber, BFQ, and BFQ low-latency. This round of tests were done on the high performance Corsair Force MP600 1TB PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSD while similar tests are still being conducted on SATA SSDs and HDDs off Linux 5.6.

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Server: CentOS, MitM, Ceph, Kubernetes and Linux Bashing

Filed under
Server
  • Learn CentOS Part 11 - Installing and removing Packages

    In the "Learn CentOS" series, you'll learn all the skills you'll need to know to manage real servers and get you on your way to mastering the art of Linux administration.

  • How to avoid man-in-the-middle cyber attacks

    Remember, you don't have to click anything online right away, and you don't have to follow random people's instructions, no matter how urgent they may seem. The internet will still be there after you step away from the computer and verify the identity of a person or site demanding your attention.

    While MITM attacks can happen to anyone, understanding what they are, knowing how they happen, and actively taking steps to prevent them can safeguard you from being a victim.

  • Another perspective on Swift versus Ceph today

    Mark's perspective is largely founded in the fault tolerance and administrative overhead. However, let's a look at "keep using [Ceph] for object too".

    Indeed the integration of block, POSIX, and object storage is Ceph's strength, although I should note for the record that Ceph has a large gap: all 3 APIs live in separate namespaces. So, do not expect to be able to copy a disk snapshot through CephFS or RGW. Objects in each namespace are completely invisible to two others, and the only uniform access layer is RADOS. This is why, for instance, RGW-over-NFS exists. That's right, not CephFS, but NFS. You can mount RGW.

    All attempts at this sort of integration that I know in Swift always start with a uniform access first. It the opposite of Ceph in a way. Because of that, these integrations typically access from the edge inside, like making a pool that a daemon fills/spills with Swift, and mounting that. SwiftStacks's ProxyFS is a little more native to Swift, but it starts off with a shared namespace too.

  • API Priority and Fairness Alpha

    This blog describes “API Priority And Fairness”, a new alpha feature in Kubernetes 1.18. API Priority And Fairness permits cluster administrators to divide the concurrency of the control plane into different weighted priority levels. Every request arriving at a kube-apiserver will be categorized into one of the priority levels and get its fair share of the control plane’s throughput.

  • BlackBerry: Chinese cybercriminals target high-value Linux servers with weak defenses [Ed: To CBS, servers that are improperly maintained or set up are "Linux"; if it's something Windows, they won't even specify the platform and won't blame Microsoft.]

GNU MediaGoblin: We’re still here!

Filed under
GNU

Hello Goblin-Lovers! [tap tap] Is this thing still on? … Great! Well, we’ve had a few polite questions as to what’s happening in MediaGoblin-land, given our last blog post was a few years back. Let’s talk about that.

While development on MediaGoblin has slowed over the last few years, work has continued steadily, with significant improvements such as multi-resolution video (Vijeth Aradhya), video subtitles (Saksham) and a bunch of minor improvements and bug-fixes. Like most community-driven free software projects, progress only happens when people show up and make it happen. See below for a list of the wonderful people who have contributed over the last few years. Thank you all very much!

In recent years, Chris Lemmer Webber has stepped back from the role of much-loved project leader to focus on ActivityPub and the standardisation of federated social networking protocols. That process was a lot of work but ultimately successful with ActivityPub becoming a W3C recommendation in 2018 and going on to be adopted by a range of social networking platforms. Congratulations to Chris, Jessica and the other authors on the success of ActivityPub! In particular though, we would like to express our gratitude for Chris’s charismatic leadership, community organising and publicity work on MediaGoblin, not to mention the coding and artwork contributions. Thanks Chris!

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The 20 Best Xfce Themes for Linux System in 2020

Filed under
Linux

Theming and customization is a huge aspect of the Linux world. No other operating system offers such kind of flexibility customizing the desktop. Every desktop environment is great for customizing the look of the Linux system. The Xfce desktop environment is no exception. Instead, it has a massive library of themes and large community support. They are consistently developing Xfce themes for your desktop. Installing and customizing Xfce themes for Linux is also very easy. This article is going to be a handbook for Xfce desktop customization and tweaks.

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How to Create Templates in LibreOffice to Save Time and Increase Productivity

Filed under
LibO
HowTos

Creating a template in LibreOffice can save you some time for the documents that you use often. It can be a letter, a financial spreadsheet or even a presentation.

Time is one factor that a template can save and on the other hand it provides consistency where a group of people in an organization work together at the same project.

For example, if you are a small organization that has to often issue certificates of experience, instead of copy-pasting from a saved document somewhere, you can create a template. When you need to issue a new certificate of experience, you create a new one from the template, edit it slightly and you are good to go.

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Foliate Linux GTK eBook Reader 2.0 Released With A Plethora Of Changes

Filed under
Linux

Foliate Linux GTK eBook reader had a major new release. The latest 2.0 version comes a redesigned user interface that works better on smaller screens and other important changes, a new continuous scrolling layout, e-reader style navigation, new themes, and much more.

Besides these important to have features for an eBook viewer, the application also has various minor features that many will find useful, like viewing an eBook's metadata, remember where you left off, fullscreen mode, and more.

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Games: KeeperRL, Stellaris, SHEEPO, Depth of Extinction, Ufflegrim

Filed under
Gaming
  • KeeperRL, the fantastic mix of a dungeon simulator with roguelike and RPG bits has a new free version out

    Bored? Quarantine or Isolation due to the Coronavirus got you down? Time to check out a new game then. KeeperRL, a game that blends together a dungeon building sim with a roguelike and RPG mechanics has a free build up.

    Technically, you could get a free copy of KeeperRL before as the developer has given it away free for a long time—however that was the ASCII version with no proper graphics. It's code is also open source under the GPL...

  • Paradox confirm a large free update for Stellaris in May, and it hit a big concurrent player peak recently

    Stellaris recently gained the massive Federations expansion, and now that's out the door Paradox Interactive and Paradox Development Studio are looking ahead towards a big free update due in May.

    Before we get into that, it looks like the popularity of Stellaris has been renewed somewhat since Federations launch. Stellaris hit a peak concurrent player count of over 64 thousand in March, the highest since release 4 years ago. Since then, it's still regularly seeing higher than normally player counts.

  • Quirky metroidvania platformer 'SHEEPO' has you steal eggs and gain transformation powers

    SHEEPO, a new upcoming 'quirky' metroidvania platformer recently appeared on Steam, and it instantly pulled in my attention due to the beautiful style. When they describe it as quirky, they're certainly not wrong. You play as some sort of shape-shifting sheep-thing, travelling across an uncharted planet. Why? You're collecting samples of each living species for an intergalactic species database.

    You can't just grab a fully grown creature though, you have to search to find their eggs. They're guarded of course, so you have to overcome the Queen of each species. Once you manage to collect the egg, you then get the ability to transform into it.

  • Tactical RPG 'Depth of Extinction' gains a revamp with a Definitive Edition out now

    HOF Studios have given their tactical RPG with turn-based combat, Depth of Extinction, a full makeover with a fresh Definitive Edition as a massive free update.

    Blending together elements of FTL and XCOM, it didn't get the best reviews (Mixed overall) and at release largely went unnoticed (until the Steam key debacle anyway). Still, thankfully, the developer kept at it and they've tried to expand it, while also removing or replacing elements that didn't work well in this new Definitive Edition. You can now switch between characters instead of it using an initiative system (so it's more like XCOM), there's Stealth and Ambushes now, more mech units, the game loop has been shortened down from around 20 hours to 10, a brand new tutorial and so on. It's a whole new game feel.

  • Ufflegrim is the most bizarre deck-builder yet but it looks awesome and it's out now

    Ufflegrim, a new release from Corpse King Games arrived yesterday looks absolutely bizarre blending together a deck-builder with a roguelike. All the mechanics together make it sound thoroughly unique too.

    With 100 floors to travel through and clear, you need to collect creatures which form your deck. However, it's not quite a standard 'one card equals one creature' mechanic, as you appear to be able to play one card on top of another to act like some sort of buff to the existing creature. You also have your own movement to take care of, while watching out for all the other nasties around the floor.

Announcing the LibreOffice Help editor

Filed under
LibO

News from the documentation community: The Help project of LibreOffice underwent a major revamp in the last couple of years, with the introduction of the browser-based Help replacing the old Writer-Web solution. Still, editing the Help XML files (XHP) continued to be very hard for any volunteer or skilled developer, due to the specifics of the XML dialect and time required to be proficient in writing Help pages, which continued to be a major block for any individual.

To address the issue, we developed an online editor to assist and make textual editing quicker for any Help writer, by featuring the possibility of rendering the help page at once, at the click of a button. Also, we implemented a series of checking, including XML validity and the verification of ID unicity, crucial for translation.

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10 Best Free Skype Alternatives for a Linux PC

Filed under
Linux

Skype is unarguably one of the most popular voice over IP software for audio and video calls as well as instant messaging and file sharing – and that’s not just because Microsoft is the company behind it, it packs a rich set of features that enable its users to communicate in both informal and business environments.

That notwithstanding, one of the beauties of an open software market is healthy competition and I am happy to inform you that there are more than a handful of alternatives with which you can conveniently send instant messages and host video calls as easily as you would with Skype.

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Here is what is new and changed in Firefox 75.0 Stable

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox 75.0 is the latest stable version of the Firefox web browser. Its release date is April 7. 2020. Previously released versions of Firefox, including Firefox 74.0 and Firefox 74.0.1, as well as older versions, may be upgraded to the new version.

All major versions of the Firefox web browser receive upgrades when Firefox Stable is updated. Firefox Beta and Dev versions are upgraded to version 76.0, Firefox Nightly is upgraded to version 77.0, and Firefox ESR is upgraded to version 68.7.

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QOwnNotes for Debian (update)

Filed under
Debian

Some time ago I posted about QOwnNotes for Debian. My recent experience with the openSUSE Build System has convinced me to move also the QOwnNotes packages there, which allows me to provide builds for Debian/Buster, Debian/testing, and Debian/sid, all for both i386 and amd64 architectures.

To repeat a bit about QOwnNotes, it is a cross-platform plain text and markdown note taking application. By itself, it wouldn’t be something to talk about, we have vim and emacs and everything in between. But QOwnNotes integrates nicely with the Notes application from NextCloud and OwnCloud, as well as providing useful integration with NextCloud like old version of notes, access to deleted files, watching changes, etc.

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Firefox for Remote Work and Streaming

Filed under
Moz/FF

Devices: Raspberry Pi, WinSystems and Estone

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • How to Fight Coronavirus With Your Raspberry Pi

    With the coronavirus pandemic raging, many PC users have dedicated CPU cycles to medical research using Folding@Home (we’re even doing a fold-off competition with AnandTech). Though Folding@Home does not run on a Raspberry Pi, you can participate in Rosetta@Home, a similar project that’s also researching COVID-19, by installing a free Linux app called BOINC.

    BOINC has been around for a long time and supports many different research projects, including Asteroids@Home, which does space research, and some of these projects will work on Raspbian, Raspberry Pi’s official OS. However, the addition of Rosetta@Home is new, and if you want to join that project, you need to run BOINC on a 64-bit operating system (OS), such as Ubuntu (64-bit). Rosetta@Home will not give you any workloads if you try it in Raspbian.

    Here’s how to use your Raspberry Pi to fight coronavirus with BOINC and Rosetta@Home.

  • Compact Apollo Lake computer runs Linux

    WinSystems’ fanless, Linux-ready “SYS-ITX-N-3900” computer has an Apollo Lake SoC, -20 to 60°C support, wide-range power, M.2 and mini-PCIe expansion, and a compact 150 x 150 x 50mm footprint.

    A year and a half after the first Intel Gemini Lake based embedded computers arrived, we have seen only a few models based on this latest Atom family of chips. Gemini Lake continues to be in short supply, as it has been since its arrival.

    Yet, the industry keeps churning out computers based on the similarly 14nm fabricated Apollo Lake platform. The latest is WinSystems’ fanless SYS-ITX-N-3900, which runs Linux or Windows 10 IoT on dual- or quad-core Apollo Lake Atom SoCs.

  • i.MX8M Mini Pico-ITX board has a DSP for voice control plus optional AI

    Estone’s “EMB-2237-AI” Pico-ITX SBC integrates a “SOM-2237” module that runs Linux on an i.MX8M Mini and adds a DSP for audio. The carrier adds LAN with PoE, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, mics and speakers, and an M.2 slot with Edge TPU AI support.

    Estone Technology’s EMB-2237-AI is the first SBC we’ve seen to combine the 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX form-factor with an NXP i.MX8M Mini SoC. Other Mini-based SBCs include Seco’s SBC-C61, Boardcon’s sandwich-style EM-IMX8M-MINI, and Garz & Fricke’s recent Tanaro, among others.

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