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Thursday, 13 Aug 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Why I still love tcsh after all these years Rianne Schestowitz 12/08/2020 - 7:50am
Story An Android operating system that prioritizes mobile data privacy Rianne Schestowitz 12/08/2020 - 7:47am
Story Debian GNU/Linux 11 (Bullseye) Artwork Contest Is Now Open for Entries Rianne Schestowitz 1 12/08/2020 - 7:44am
Story Decision Making With If Else and Case Statements in Bash Scripts itsfoss 12/08/2020 - 5:32am
Story GNOME 3.36.5 Desktop Update Released with Various Improvements and Bug Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 12/08/2020 - 3:55am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 12/08/2020 - 12:24am
Story Audiocasts/Screecasts, Linux App Summit, LIMBAS and More Roy Schestowitz 11/08/2020 - 11:57pm
Story Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 11/08/2020 - 11:53pm
Story Linux Devices and Open Hardware Roy Schestowitz 11/08/2020 - 11:51pm
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 11/08/2020 - 11:45pm

Debian-Based Finnix 121 Live Linux Distro Arrives with Goodies for Sysadmins

Filed under
Linux
Debian

In early May, the Finnix developers celebrated the project’s 20th anniversary with the release of Finnix 120, making Finnix one of the oldest LiveCDs for system administrators that’s still maintained and kept up to date with the latest GNU/Linux and Open Source technologies.

It’s actually good to see people still maintaining older distributions, and the new release, Finnix 121, brings a bag of goodies that include a new base from the Debian Testing repositories, where the Debian Project currently develops the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye” operating system series.

Read more

Darktable 3.2 Open-Source RAW Image Editor Released with Major New Features

Filed under
OSS

Darktable 3.2.1 is now available and it’s the first major update to the application since the introduction of the 3.0 series. If you’re asking, there wasn’t a 3.2.0 release, nor a 3.1 release. The development team jumped straight to the 3.2.1 version number from version 3.0.2, which you’re probably using right now on your GNU/Linux distribution, because of a last minute bug in the 3.2.0 release.

But don’t let the version number fool you, because Darktable 3.2.1 is a massive update with lots of goodies for amateur and professional photographers alike. Highlights include support for up to 8K screen resolutions thanks to the complete rewrite of the Lighttable View and the revamped Filmstrip.

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Kernel: EULA, Linux 5.8 and Linux 5.9

Filed under
Linux

  • A "Large Hardware Vendor" Wants A EULA Displayed For Firmware Updates On Linux

    The open-source Fwupd firmware updating utility paired with LVFS as the Linux Vendor Firmware Service has seen explosive growth for vastly improving the BIOS/firmware updating experience on Linux. Many major hardware vendors distribute their firmware updates on LVFS for consumption by Fwupd and more than 17 million firmware files have been served. Now though there is a new "large hardware vendor" willing to distribute their firmware updates this way but they want a end-user license agreement (EULA) added. 

    Fwupd/LVFS lead developer Richard Hughes of Red Hat noted today that "A large hardware vendor wants to join the LVFS, but only on the agreement that every user has to agree to a English-only EULA text when deploying their firmware updates. This is the first vendor that's required this condition, and breaks all kinds of automated deployment." 

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  • Linux 5.8 released: Bootlin contributions

    Linux 5.8 was released recently. See our usual resources for a good coverage of the highlights of this new release: KernelNewbies page, LWN.net article on the first part of the merge window, LWN.net article on the second part of the merge window.

    On our side, we contributed a total of 155 commits to Linux 5.8, which makes Bootlin the 19th contributing company by number of commits according to Linux Kernel Patch Statistic. 

  • SD Times news digest: New Relic and Grafana Lab on open instrumentation, Atlassian TEAM Anywhere, and Linux 5.8 rc-1 released [Ed: No, Linux 5.8 rc-1 released ages ago]

    The Linux working group stated that 5.8 looks to be one of the project’s biggest releases of all time, including a lot of fundamental core work and cleanups, as well as filesystem work and driver updates. 

    Within the 5.8 merge window, about 20% of all the files in the kernel source repository have been modified. 

    In total, the release includes over 14k non-merge commits (over 15k counting merges), 800k new lines, and over 14 thousand files changed.

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  • Linux 5.9 HID Has Improvement For Faster Probe/Boot Time

    The HID changes for Linux 5.9 aren't too many but there are a few worth mentioning for improving input device support on Linux. 

  • XFS Is Packing Many Improvements With Linux 5.9

    The XFS file-system has many improvements ready for the Linux 5.9 kernel. 

    The main XFS feature pull was sent in on Friday for Linux 5.9 and includes a wealth of improvements for this mature file-system...

Beaker Browser – A P2P Browser for Web Hackers.

Filed under
OSS
Web

Beaker is a free and open-source web browser built to enable users to publish websites and web apps themselves directly from the browser without having to set up a separate web server or hosting their content with a 3rd party.

To quote one of the project devs, it has been built to “to give users more control over the Web”. We’ve covered several projects based on similar technology (e.g. PeerTube) but this one has a little more icing on the cake.

[...]

The Dat protocol is favoured over HTTP for Beaker for 5 main reasons. It can sync archives from multiple sources; the URLs remain the same even when the archives can change hosts. All updates have checksums; changes are written to an append-only version log, and any archive can be hosted on any device. Although it uses Dat by default, Beaker supports connecting to traditional servers with HTTP so you can equally visit typical websites.

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Lenovo’s New ThinkPad P53 Is Everything I Want In A Linux Laptop

Filed under
Linux

This is not a review of the new Fedora-powered ThinkPad P53 which releases later this month. Rather, it’s a story about being spoiled by hardware. It’s a tale about giving a Linux distribution another chance. It’s a subtle admission that maybe, just maybe, we shouldn’t rule out corporate behemoths like Lenovo in our search for the perfect Linux laptop. This somewhat melodramatic introduction is meant to boil down to one bold statement: holy crap, the Fedora-powered ThinkPad P53 is amazing.

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The 10 Best Linux Performance Monitoring Tools

Filed under
Linux

Do you want to monitor the performance of your Linux system? Are you looking for some powerful performance monitoring tools to help you out? If you agree, it’s your day as we have put together a detailed list of the ten best Linux performance monitoring tools. Performance monitoring tools can help users check on how much system resources are being used and which apps are consuming what percentage of it. This helps the user to properly manage the applications and make sure that the system is in good health.

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Games: Epic Store, 9 Monkeys and Tiny Teams Festival

Filed under
Gaming
  • Challenging co-op dungeon crawler 'Barony' gets Linux Steam and Epic Store crossplay

    Recently, the first-person dungeon crawling roguelike Barony had a bit of an upgrade along with a release on the Epic Store and that came with crossplay.

    "Barony is the premier first-person roguelike RPG with cooperative play. Cryptic items, brutal traps and devious monsters, like those found in classic roguelikes and CRPGs, await you. Conquer the dungeon alone, or gather a perfect party in co-op with iconic and exotic RPG classes."

  • Get ready to beat 'em up as 9 Monkeys of Shaolin releases in October

    9 Monkeys of Shaolin is an upcoming beat 'em up from Sobaka Studio, what they claim will mark the "true rebirth of the iconic beat 'em up genre in vein of old-school video games".

    We've been waiting on this for quite some time now after being announced back in 2018. They've now confirmed it will see a release on October 16.

  • The 'Tiny Teams Festival' on Steam shines a light on micro studios

    Tiny Teams Festival, a little sale and event page went live on Steam recently to showcase a bunch of micro-teams and their games and there's a few fun picks there.

    Run by Yogscast Games, a YouTube / Twitch group that have turned to publishing indie games. So you could compare this little Steam event to other publisher-focused sales although this includes plenty not published by Yogscast. It's interesting for us, because smaller teams are what make up a large majority of games supported on Linux. They're the ones who most need our support too and so it's nice to highlight some good stuff they make.

100 days of 'Public Money? Public Code!' in Munich

Filed under
GNU

100 days ago, the new Green-Red coalition in Munich adopted the principle of 'Public Money? Public Code!' to guide their procurement of software. Now, we take a look at the first activities undertaken for the use of Free Software.

100 days ago, the coalition agreement "Mit Mut, Visionen und Zuversicht: Ganz München im Blick (With courage, vision and confidence: All of Munich in view") was signed in Munich by the new government groups Grüne/Rosa Liste and SPD/Volt, as well as by the Lord Mayor Dieter Reiter. This agreement contains a strong commitment to the use of Free Software; that in the future, the principle of 'Public Money? Public Code!' shall apply. Munich has thus agreed to the FSFE's demand; in turn, we are happy about this decision and have promised to follow and evaluate its implementation.

Together with LibreOffice Foundation "The Document Foundation", we asked the two groups what activities they have undertaken in the last 100 days to implement 'Public Money? Public Code!' in Munich.

Of course, significant changes cannot always be accomplished after a mere 100 days, especially considering the difficulties in current events. However, it is still easy to see if the new government is serious about its commitment, or if is just empty words, by their actions so far.

Read more

GhostBSD 20.08.04 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

I am happy to announce the availability of GhostBSD 20.08.04. This release comes with kernel, OS and software application updates. We updated the MATE desktop to 1.24.0.

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EasyOS version 2.3.8 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Many changes since 2.3.3!

Read more

Release note:

  • Easy Buster version 2.3.8

    EasyOS versions 1.x are the "Pyro" series, the latest is 1.3. Easy Pyro is built with packages compiled from source using 'oe-qky-src', a fork of OpenEmbedded. Consequently, the builds are small and streamlined and integrated. The Pyro series may have future releases, but it is considered to be in maintenance status.
    The "Buster" series start from version 2.0, and are intended to be where most of the action is, ongoing. Version 2.0 was really a beta-quality build, to allow the testers to report back. The first official release was 2.1.
    The main feature of Easy Buster is that it is built from Debian 10 Buster DEBs, using WoofQ (a fork of Woof2: Woof-CE is another fork, used to build Puppy Linux).
    The advantage of Buster over Pyro is access to the large Debian package repositories. That is a big plus.

Elecrow's new Raspberry Pi laptop is perfect for STEM students

Filed under
Linux

Since launching back in 2012, the Raspberry Pi has proven to be an extremely successful method of miniaturising the PC experience, with sales topping 30 million at the end of 2019.

At just US$35, it's an extremely affordable way to make your first steps into the world of computer science, allowing you to build a fully functioning computer with relatively little expertise.

However, one of the common complaints about the Raspberry Pi is the maze of wires that you'll need to connect in order for it to work properly.

Hong Kong-based company Elecrow is hoping to change that with the CrowPi2, a tiny laptop which is making waves on crowdfunding platform Kickstarter. With an initial goal to raise around £15,000, it's at over £420,000 at the time of writing and growing all the time.

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Ubuntu 18.04.5 and 16.04.7 LTS Release Candidate ISOs Now Ready for Public Testing

Filed under
Ubuntu

After last week’s release of Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS as the first point release in the Focal Fossa series, Canonical is now working on new point releases for its long-term supported Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series.

Your reaction right now would be like… wait, Ubuntu 16.04.7? Why? Aren’t there only five point releases during the life cycle of an Ubuntu LTS series? Yes, you’re right, Canonical usually bakes only five ISO point releases for each LTS series, but sometime they have to release emergency ISOs because of some nasty bugs.

It happened last year with Ubuntu 16.04.6 LTS and Ubuntu 14.04.6 LTS (now ESM) to patch a critical security vulnerability in the APT package manager, which allowed attackers to execute code as root or possibly install malicious apps and crash the system.

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KDE neon Rebased on 20.04

Filed under
KDE

KDE neon is our installable Linux with continuous integration and deployment. It’s based on Ubuntu who had a new Long Term Support Release recently so we’ve rebased it on Ubuntu 20.04 now.

You should see a popup on your install in the next day or so. It’ll ask you to make sure your system is up to date then it’ll upgrade the base to 20.04 which takes a while to download and then another while to install.

Afterwards it should look just the same because it’s the same wonderful Plasma desktop.

Read more

Also: KDE neon Is Now Based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa)

Everything You Need to Know About Linux Ubuntu Server

Filed under
Linux
Server
Ubuntu

As you should probably know, Linux powers the majority of the web we see today. This is mainly because Linux systems are inherently more secure and stable than other systems. There are several types of Linux distributions for powering servers. Some notable ones include Ubuntu, Red Hat, Debian, and CentOS. Ubuntu, in particular, has been enjoying a surge in popularity as a server distro in recent times. In this guide, our editors have outlined why the Linux Ubuntu server is outgrowing many of its competitions. Stay with us throughout this guide to learn why Ubuntu shines as a server distro.

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Byte – music player designed for elementary OS

Filed under
OS

I spend an inordinate amount of time listening to music. My favorite pastime is to see an eclectic range of bands, solo artists, and orchestras live. It’s such a life-changing and exhilarating experience. It’s one thing to be sitting at home listening to a CD or watching music videos on TV or on YouTube, but being in the audience, packed out in a stadium or music hall, takes it to another level. But it’s an expensive pastime, and on hold given the current coronavirus pandemic. These days, I’m listening to music from my CD collection which I’ve encoded to FLAC, a lossless audio format.

Linux is endowed with a plethora of open source music players. And I’ve reviewed the vast majority. But I seem to keep finding interesting music players. Byte is the latest I’ve stumbled across.

Byte is a GTK-based music player. It was created with the desire to make a good music player for elementary OS. It focuses on two aspects: features and design. Byte isn’t tied to elementary OS; it runs on other Linux distributions. It’s in a fairly early stage of development, with its initial release only back in August 2019.

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AMD Ryzen Embedded SBC Review with Ubuntu 20.04

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

DFI GHF51 Ryzen Embedded SBC runs about as well in Ubuntu 20.04 as it does in Windows 10. Everything basically works and performs well. Our testing shows AMD Ryzen Embedded R1606G processor to offer slightly better performance than the top of the line Intel Gemini Lake Pentium J5005 processor.

I also had one of the same issues as in Windows: one Seagate USB hard drive would not work reliability at all with transfer stalled. That’s probably just a hardware incompatibility, as the drive works with other platforms, and other USB storage devices achieve normal performance when connected to DFI SBC. I also noticed some artifacts with one 3D graphics benchmark, but those did not show up in other 3D accelerated programs.

DFI GHF51 is an impressive piece of hardware as it packs lots of CPU and GPU power in a form factor similar to Raspberry Pi 4 SBC. I’d like to thank DFI for sending a review sample. If you plan to buy in large quantities to integrate the board into your product, you could contact the company via the product page. It’s used to be available as a sample on the company’s DFI-ITOX online store for $378, but it has been taken down since last time.

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Photoflare: An Open Source Image Editor for Simple Editing Needs

Filed under
OSS

When it comes to image editing on Linux, GIMP is the first and obvious choice. But GIMP could be overwhelming if you don’t need advanced editing feature. This is where applications like Photoflare step in.

Photoflare is an editor that provides basic image editing features with a simple-to-use interface.

It is inspired by the popular Windows application PhotoFiltre. The application is not a clone though and it has been written in C++ from scratch and uses Qt framework for the interface.

The features include cropping, flipping/rotating, resizing image. You can also tools like paint brush, paint bucket, spray can, blur tool and eraser. The magic wand tool lets you select a specific area of the image.

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Games RPCS3, NeuroSlicers and More

Filed under
Gaming

           

  • Darkest Dungeon - The Butcher's Circus due for Linux 'in the next week or so'

    Red Hook Studios are currently working on the free DLC The Butcher's Circus and with Season 2 about to release, the Linux (and macOS) versions are just about ready.

    To be clear, Darkest Dungeon is already on Linux but the updates to support this brand new competitive game mode are not. Red Hook Studios have been pretty clear on it for some time that it would come later, and they mentioned in early July about it being close but they wanted to ensure they're ready for release.

  •        

  • PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 gains online play with PSN Emulation

    It seems a very exciting development will be coming to the next release of the PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3.

    While they haven't done a blog post to go over their progress since 2019, work is as always ongoing. The main reason they don't often talk about progress, is simply a lack of people to go over it all and blog about it for them.

    Thankfully though, they do release videos to show off and talk about some of the major progress. One such brand new feature coming is online play via PSN Emulation. That is absolutely huge especially since online features were such a major part of some games.

  • Upcoming 'post-cyberpunk' RTS NeuroSlicers looks great, Steam page up

    NeuroSlicers is an upcoming in-development real-time strategy game that aims to 'modernize' the genre with a 'post-cyberpunk' setting and it's looking slick.

    "Instead of seeing how fast you can click, NeuroSlicers tasks you with how fast you can think. Using intelligent AI-powered units, you are free to make more significant, more strategic decisions that focus on territory control, resource management, upgrading and careful placement of customizable buildings, units and powerful function abilities called Scripts."

    It's been quite a long time since we last covered it, while also keeping an eye on their progress. They've now announced that their Steam page has finally gone live as they continue their very early testing period. While this 'pre-alpha' is currently limited to supporting Windows, they confirmed to GOL on Twitter that a Linux release continues to be planned.

  • Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition gets more graphical upgrades

    Beamdog are really starting to put the Enhanced into Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition and showing just how much they care about the classic RPG experiences as a studio.

    A fresh development build for Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition went up recently with a brand new Lighting Engine and the difference it makes is quite ridiculous. They said their aim with this is to "allow much higher quality future content, but also in large to enhance the visual quality of existing content" and since pictures say more than a thousand words they showed quite a few examples. 

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