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Wednesday, 24 Apr 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 23/04/2019 - 10:31pm
Story Ubuntu: Pop!_OS 19.04 is here! Rianne Schestowitz 23/04/2019 - 10:25pm
Story Ubuntu 19.04 comes refreshed with the Linux 5.0 kernel Rianne Schestowitz 27 23/04/2019 - 10:22pm
Story Red Hat Breathes New Life Into Java Rianne Schestowitz 23/04/2019 - 10:18pm
Story Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 released Rianne Schestowitz 23/04/2019 - 6:50pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 23/04/2019 - 4:56pm
Story Server: Cloudwashing by SUSE and Openwashing by Red Hat Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2019 - 4:29pm
Story Security: Updates, One Year With Spectre, Purism Librem Key and Lanner’s 'Security Appliances' With Back-Doored Chips Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2019 - 4:25pm
Story Mozilla on Nuisance Videos and Servo Progress Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2019 - 4:23pm
Story Programming and HowTos: The Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2019 - 4:21pm

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Fedora/Red Hat/OSS: Red Hat Summit for Big Banks, Impressions of Fedora 30 and TeleIRC

Filed under
OSS
  • Red Hat Summit 2019 session highlights: Financial Services

    The financial services industry is one that seems to be constantly changing - whether it be regulatory driven or market driven - and how consumers are accessing their banking and financial information is as dynamic as the technology industries that they rely on in their day-to-day life. Red Hat’s enterprise open source technologies can help financial firms and fintechs alike craft modern, innovative solutions designed to drive higher levels of returns and at scale. This year at Red Hat Summit, taking place in Boston May 6-9, we are offering a variety of financial industry focused breakout sessions and labs to help navigate the impact that open source technologies could have on your firm,  and help you understand your options when it comes to getting the most from your investments.

  • My Impressions of Fedora 30 so far (Beta Review)
  • TeleIRC v1.3.1 released with quality-of-life improvements

    On April 20th, 2019, the TeleIRC development team released TeleIRC v1.3.1, the latest version after the final development sprint for the university semester. This release introduces minor improvements in order to accommodate heavier work-balance loads on our volunteer contributors. However, it gave us an opportunity to reduce technical debt. This blog post explains what’s new in TeleIRC v1.3.1 and also offers a retrospective into how this last sprint went.

Multimedia and Graphics: GStreamer, AMDVLK and DRM Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • GStreamer Editing Services OpenTimelineIO support

    OpenTimelineIO is an Open Source API and interchange format for editorial timeline information, it basically allows some form of interoperability between the different post production Video Editing tools. It is being developed by Pixar and several other studios are contributing to the project allowing it to evolve quickly.

    We, at Igalia, recently landed support for the GStreamer Editing Services (GES) serialization format in OpenTimelineIO, making it possible to convert GES timelines to any format supported by the library. This is extremely useful to integrate GES into existing Post production workflow as it allows projects in any format supported by OpentTimelineIO to be used in the GStreamer Editing Services and vice versa.

  • AMDVLK 2019.Q2.2 Brings More Performance Optimizations, DXVK Corruption Fixes

    AMD this morning released AMDVLK 2019.Q2.2 as the newest tagged update to their open-source Radeon Vulkan Linux graphics driver. 

    The AMDVLK 2019.Q2.2 update is notable in that it has performance optimizations for Total War: WARHAMMER II, Talos Principle, and Thrones of Britannia. These were among the games we pointed out earlier this month in our recent RADV vs. AMDVLK driver benchmarking where previously AMDVLK performed much better but less so in that recent comparison. So it looks like the AMDVLK vs. RADV driver performance is back to some healthy competition. 

  • MSM DRM Driver Bringing Zap Shader Support To Exit Secure Mode On Adreno 600 Series

    The Freedreno MSM DRM driver changes have been submitted to DRM-Next ahead of Linux 5.2. MSM provides the Direct Rendering Manager support around Qualcomm Adreno hardware and with this next kernel cycle is continuing to see better Adreno 600 series support. 

    The primary addition to MSM with Linux 5.2 is zap shader support. A "zap" shader is a way for Adreno hardware to exit its secure mode via a series of specialized commands as accessing the registers directly for exiting the GPU secure mode is generally locked down by the bootloader. 

The Great GNU/Linux Division

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I have not abandoned the language of the purists altogether. For instance, I still refer to my distribution of choice as ?Debian GNU/Linux,? because that is what project members prefer. Similarly, if an FSF employee asks that I use their preferred term, I will usually agree if I think the story I?m covering is one in which people should know the difference.

What has changed is my refusal to be overly-concerned about such matters of language. While language issues were worth discussing 20 years ago, the inability to move beyond them is obsessive and crankish today. If the purists really want to help free software, they would be more useful contributing to the project of their choice than clinging a cause that was lost years ago.

Read more

NetworkManager 1.18 Released With Policy Routing Rules, VLAN Filtering For Linux Bridge

Filed under
Software

NetworkManager 1.16 was released in March with WireGuard support, WiFi P2P, Intel IWD improvements, and much more. Surprisingly being released already is NetworkManager 1.18.

With just one month having passed since NetworkManager 1.16, the NetworkManager 1.18 release is quite small and with just a few changes. Namely it includes the few changes from NetworkManager 1.17.2 already covered on Phoronix and a few more.

Read more

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

Security: 'Phone' Gimmicks, GNU/Linux Tools and More

Filed under
Security
  • Guess Who Fooled The Nokia9 PureView – A Pack Of Chewing Gum!

    We are all aware that smartphone security options such as fingerprint scanners and facial recognition aren’t 100% secure. This has been proved further with the case of the Nokia 9 PureView, which appears to have been unlocked by a pack of chewing gum.

    As per a couple of tweets, the Nokia 9 PureView is reportedly getting unlocked via unidentified fingerprints of another user and a pack of chewing gum.

  • Linux Distributions Should Enhance how Sudo Asks for Passwords

    One thing to be noticed from the picture above is that the password is hidden. When users write anything at that time, nothing will be displayed on the screen, not even asterisks. They’ll have to trust that there’s something written in the terminal and just write their passwords and hit Enter.

    Historically, this is done for both ease of implementation and security reasons. It makes it difficult for people standing near your shoulder from knowing your password length. If they don’t know your password length, it would be harder for them to guess it. They can, of course, listen to the keystrokes you are hitting and try to guess how many characters did you hit? But that’s more difficult than just looking at the screen and counting the number of asterisks there.

    Also, when they see that your password is too long, they might not even try to use your computer and guess your password. But if your password is less than few characters, it will give them hope.

    Additionally, in terms of implementation, displaying an asterisk instead of the password character requires more code and work to do. In the terminal, when you write normal commands and you see them in the terminal, it’s because the “echo mode” is set to On, meaning that all characters will be displayed on your screen. In sensitive commands, however, such as sudo or passwd, “echo mode” is set to Off, which simply doesn’t take the extra step of printing those characters to the screen. So that’s less work and code to do, and it went on like that since the Unix days to simply hide the password characters

  • Top 10 Best Linux Password Managers In 2019

    If you are a Linux users and struggling to get a proper password manager then this post is for you. In this post, We have listed the best (at least for us) Linux password managers for you.

  • Your Netflix Bandersnatch Choices Can Be Tracked By Hackers

    Netflix took the video streaming industry by storm when it debuted Black Mirror: Bandersnatch last year. The “choose your own adventure” themed movie puts viewers in charge of the story and flow of the movie. The success of Bandersnatch even led to the creation of a second interactive show ‘You vs. Wild’ featuring Bear Grylls.

  • Proactively Identifying Compromised Passwords | Roadmap to Securing Your Infrastructure

Dropped Linux Kernel Drivers Occasionally See Revival - FDOMAIN Gets Second Chance

Filed under
Linux

When drivers get dropped from the Linux kernel it's generally due to hardware being no one cares about anymore that hasn't been produced in many years and the code often falls into disrepair to the point that the only logical way forward is dropping the driver. That happened last year to the "FDOMAIN" driver but as does happen every so often (albeit rare) thanks to the code being still obtainable through Git and the nature of open-source, interested parties can step up and revive the code.

The FDOMAIN Linux driver is for Future Domain 16-bit SCSI host adapters found in a variety of PCI boards. The code was removed in March of 2018 as the Future Domain drivers hadn't seen any bug fixing in years and were relying upon SCSI infrastructure deprecated some fifteen years earlier. The supported PCI SCSI adapters haven't even been produced in many years albeit can still be found from some after-market shops / eBay like the Adaptec AHA-2920A card that allows up to seven SCSI peripherals over PCI.

Read more

Strawberry: A Fork of Clementine Music Player

Filed under
Software

In this age of streaming music and cloud services, there are still people who need an application to collect and play their music. If you are such a person, this article should interest you.

We have earlier covered Sayonara music player. Today, we will be taking a look at the Strawberry Music Player.

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DragonFlyBSD 5.4.2 Rolls Out With Two Dozen Fixes

Filed under
BSD

While awaiting DragonFlyBSD 5.6 as the BSD operating system's next feature release, DragonFlyBSD 5.4.2 has been released as the newest stable point release.

DragonFlyBSD 5.4.2 provides just over two dozen fixes over the previous 5.4.1 point release from last December. Among the changes to find with DragonFlyBSD 5.4.2 are updating the list of USB 3.0 PCI IDs from FreeBSD, fixing various panics, adding an AC256 sound quirk, adding /dev/part-by-label interface, updating the kernel's ACPI code from FreeBSD, and a variety of other fixes.

Read more

Games: Simple Dot, Talk to Strangers, and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Minimalistic puzzle game 'Simple Dot' releasing next month, looks like it could be interesting

    Simple Dot seems like it has a nice idea, with you drawing lines to get balls from one end of a level to another. A simple idea but it looks like it does get quite complicated later on.

  • Talk to Strangers, a game of everyday survival as you become a door to door sales person

    Here's a bit of an odd one, Talk to Strangers puts you in the shoes of a sales person going door to door. It released last week with Linux support and the developer, Post Mortem Pixels, did send over a key so I've played it for a little while to gather some thoughts on it.

    It's actually an expanded idea of their Game Jam entry Don't Talk to Strangers (itch.io), released during the Stencyl Game Jam back in 2016. They said they were impressed by the feedback it gained, so they expanded and evolved it into a full game with Talk to Strangers.

  • A look at some great Linux gaming deals not to be missed this week

    Another week has begun, it's hot and so it's a good time to stay inside playing games obviously. Here's a look over what's going cheap this week.

    Firstly, Humble Store is doing a Team17 Publisher Week with a few nice Linux games on offer like Flockers, Overcooked! 2 and Sheltered. If you act fast Humble also have Dying Light: The Following - Enhanced Edition going really cheap for another 5 hours.

The end of Scientific Linux

Filed under
Linux

Scientific Linux is driven by Fermilab's scientific mission and focused
on the changing needs of experimental facilities.

Fermilab is looking ahead to DUNE[1] and other future international
collaborations. One part of this is unifying our computing platform with
collaborating labs and institutions.

Toward that end, we will deploy CentOS 8 in our scientific computing
environments rather than develop Scientific Linux 8. We will
collaborate with CERN and other labs to help make CentOS an even better
platform for high-energy physics computing.

Read more

10 Best Programming Languages to Learn Hacking

Filed under
Development

We covered the Best 20 Hacking and Penetration Tools for Kali Linux and I am happy that our readers were excited at the new tools they came across. However, getting the tools is one thing and knowing how to use them properly is another.

Hacking involves breaking the protocols of any system on a network and while this can be done by a plethora of applications available for free, being a hacker requires you to understand the languages that the software that you have in focus is written in and they are usually written in a range of common languages.

Today, we bring you a list of programming languages that you should know if you want to build a career as a hacker.

Read more

Also: How often do you contribute to open source projects?

Linux on Dex comes to Galaxy S9, Galaxy S10 and the Galaxy Tab S5e

Filed under
Linux

Linux on DeX is aimed to bring the seamless mobility of Samsung’s DeX platform for developers to code on the go. The app enables developers to work on both Android and Ubuntu-based Linux distributions anytime, anywhere. Other Linux distributions may also work, although Samsung isn’t offering official support for those yet. Also, Samsung is partnering with Canonical, the maker of the Ubuntu Linux distribution, to provide Linux on DeX users with a modified version of Ubuntu.

As of now, Linux on DeX is only compatible with the Galaxy Note 9 and the Galaxy Tab S4. However, with the new update, users of Samsung’s Galaxy S flagships from 2018 as well as 2019 get it too. The recently launched Galaxy Tab S5e also now supports Linux on DeX. The new version, which is currently in beta, also fixes the issue with Ubuntu image download on Google Chrome.

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OpenJDK 11 Now The Default Java For Ubuntu 18.04 LTS - Plus Some New OpenJDK Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Canonical has shifted the default Java of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS from OpenJDK 10 to OpenJDK 11. Plus here are some fresh OpenJDK 8/11/12 benchmarks on this Ubuntu Long Term Support release.

Ubuntu 18.04 has shifted from OpenJDK 10 to 11 since OpenJDK 11 is a long-term support release and thus better aligned with Ubuntu 18.04 being an LTS release itself than continuing to use OpenJDK 10 or the latest 12 release. This shouldn't come as a surprise as February of last year we wrote how Ubuntu 18.04 LTS would likely ship with OpenJDK 10 and then transition to 11 when ready.

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9 ways to save the planet

Filed under
OSS

What can be done to help save the planet? The question can seem depressing at a time when it feels like an individual's contribution isn't enough. But, who are we Earth dwellers if not for a collection of individuals? So, I asked our writer community to share ways that open source software or hardware can be used to make a difference. Here's what I heard back.

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The Linux desktop is not in trouble

Filed under
Linux

Writing for ZDNet earlier this month, Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols declared trouble for the Linux desktop. He’s wrong.

Or maybe not. Maybe we’re just looking at different parts of the elephant. sjvn’s core argument, if I may sum it up, is that fragmentation is holding back the Linux desktop. Linux can’t gain significant traction in the desktop market because there are just so many options. This appeals to computer nerds, but leads to confusion for general users who don’t want to care about whether they’re running GNOME or KDE Plasma or whatever.

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4 open source apps for plant-based diets

Filed under
OSS

Reducing your consumption of meat, dairy, and processed foods is better for the planet and better for your health. Changing your diet can be difficult, but several open source Android applications can help you switch to a more plant-based diet. Whether you are taking part in Meatless Monday, following Mark Bittman's Vegan Before 6:00 guidelines, or switching entirely to a whole-food, plant-based diet, these apps can aid you on your journey by helping you figure out what to eat, discover vegan- and vegetarian-friendly restaurants, and easily communicate your dietary preferences to others. All of these apps are open source and available from the F-Droid repository.

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OpenBSD 6.5 Released With RETGUARD, OpenRSYNC

OpenBSD 6.5 was released today, about one week ahead of schedule for this security-minded BSD operating system. OpenBSD 6.5 is bringing several prominent new features including RETGUARD as its new stack protector and OpenRSYNC as its ISC-licensed in-progress replacement to rsync. OpenBSD 6.5's new RETGUARD functionality aims to be a better stack protector on x86_64 and AArch64 with instrumenting every function return with better security properties than their traditional stack protector. Read more Also: OpenBSD 6.5

Development kit showcases Cortex-A76 based Snapdragon 855

Intrinsyc has launched a 96Boards CE form-factor “Snapdragon 855 Mobile HDK” that runs Android 9 on a 7nm, octa-core Snapdragon 855 with GNSS, WiFi/BT, and optional touchscreens and cameras. Intrinsyc’s Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 Mobile Hardware Development Kit is now available for $1,149, offering a development window into Qualcomm’s powerful Snapdragon 855 SoC. The new HDK runs the latest Android 9.0 Pie release. Read more

Sad News! Scientific Linux is Being Discontinued

Scientific Linux, a distributions focused on scientists in high energy physics field, will not be developed anymore. It’s creator, Fermilab, is replacing it by CentOS in its labs. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Announcing Akademy 2019 in Milan, Italy (September 7th - 13th)
    Akademy 2019 will be held at the University of Milano-Bicocca in Milan, Italy, from Saturday the 7th to Friday the 13th of September. The conference is expected to draw hundreds of attendees from the global KDE community to discuss and plan the future of the community and its technology. Many participants from the broad Free and Open Source software community, local organizations and software companies will also attend. KDE e.V. is organizing Akademy 2019 with unixMiB — the Linux User Group of the University of Milano-Bicocca. unixMiB aims to spread Open Source philosophy among students.
  • Checking out Crunchbang++
  • Intel Iris Gallium3D Picks Up Conservative Rasterization Support
    On top of Intel's new open-source OpenGL driver seeing some hefty performance optimizations, the Iris Gallium3D driver has picked up another OpenGL extension ahead of the Mesa 19.1 branching.  Iris Gallium3D now supports INTEL_conservative_rasterization alongside the existing support in the i965 driver. INTEL_conservative_rasterization is the several year old Intel extension for seeing if all fragments are at least partially covered by a polygon rather than the default rasterization mode of including fragments with at least one sample covered by a polygon.