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Saturday, 17 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Rianne Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 6:59pm
Story Slackel Linux Works Well Inside Its Openbox Rianne Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 6:40pm
Story Things You Should Know About Linux Instant Messaging Programs Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 4:18pm
Story Linux and Hardware: XScale IOP, Adlink and eMMC Flash Memory Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 4:14pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 4:10pm
Story Canonical Outs Major Linux Kernel Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases Rianne Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 3:59pm
Story The Best App Launchers for Ubuntu & Linux Mint Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 3:53pm
Story Stable kernels 5.2.9, 4.19.67, and 4.14.139 Rianne Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 3:51pm
Story Feral GameMode on Ubuntu: Everything You Need to Know Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 3:46pm
Story today's howtos and programming leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 3:36pm

Add-on for Octeon TX based SBCs enables up to 21 WiFi access points

Filed under
Linux

Gateworks’ GW16081 mini-PCIe expansion modules can be connected to its Linux-driven Newport GW6400 and GW6300 networking SBCs, enabling up to 21 WiFi APs for multi-radio applications.

When Gateworks launched its Ventana line of i.MX6-based SBCs back in 2013, it also announced a line of mini-PCIe based expansion modules for the boards. The stackable, 140 x 100mm modules include a PoE-ready, quad-GbE GW16083, a 4x mini-PCIe GW16082, and a 7x mini-PCIe GW16081.

As it turned out, the Ventana boards’ i.MX6 SoC imposes limitations on the number of full-bandwidth mini-PCIe connections that can be sustained on the GW16081. In recent years, Gateworks launched a line of Newport SBCs that run Linux on Cavium Octeon TX networking SoCs. The Octeon TX features up to 4x Cortex-A53 like ThunderX cores capable of fully exploiting the GW16081. Gateworks is now promoting the GW16081 for use with the 2x GbE Newport GW6300 and 5x GbE Newport GW6400 SBCs as a platform for multi-radio access point applications.

Read more

Using WebThings Gateway notifications as a warning system for your home

Filed under
Moz/FF

Ever wonder if that leaky pipe you fixed is holding up? With a trip to the hardware store and a Mozilla WebThings Gateway you can set up a cheap leak sensor to keep an eye on the situation, whether you’re home or away. Although you can look up detector status easily on the web-based dashboard, it would be better to not need to pay attention unless a leak actually occurs. In the WebThings Gateway 0.9 release, a number of different notification mechanisms can be set up, including emails, apps, and text messages.

Read more

Project Trident 19.08 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

This update includes the FreeBSD fixes for the “vesa” graphics driver for legacy-boot systems. The system can once again be installed on legacy-boot systems.

Read more

KTouch in KDE Apps 19.08.0

Filed under
KDE

KTouch, an application to learn and practice touch typing, has received a considerable update with today's release of KDE Apps 19.8.0. It includes a complete redesign by me for the home screen, which is responsible to select the lesson to train on.

There is now a new sidebar offering all the courses KTouch has for a total of 34 different keyboard layouts. In previous versions, KTouch presented only the courses matching the current keyboard layout. Now it is much more obvious how to train on different keyboard layouts than the current one.

Read more

Also: KDE Applications 19.08 Brings New Features to Konsole, Dolphin, Kdenlive, Okular and Dozens of Other Apps

KDE Applications 19.08 Released With Dolphin Improvements, Better Konsole Tiling

Linux-driven compute module offers three flavors of i.MX6 UltraLite

Filed under
Linux

Variscite has launched SODIMM-style “VAR-SOM-6UL” module that runs Linux on NXP’s power-efficient i.MX6 UL, ULL, and ULZ SoCs. The WiFi-equipped, -40 to 85°C ready module ships with a new “Concerto” carrier.

Prior to Embedded World in late February, Variscite previewed the VAR-SOM-6UL with incomplete details. The SODIMM-200 form-factor module has now launched starting at $24 in volume along with a VAR-SOM-6UL Development Kit and Starter Kit equipped with a Concerto carrier board. New features announced today include memory and storage details and the availability of 0 to 70°C and -40 to 85°C models.

Read more

Games: Ion Fury, From Orbit, Superstarfighter, Dota 2 and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Great looking retro-inspired FPS Ion Fury is out now with Linux support

    Ion Fury (previously Ion Maiden) from Voidpoint and 3D Realms has been officially released, this retro inspired FPS looks fantastic and it comes with full Linux support.

  • Single-player RTS game From Orbit is launching soon with Linux support

    Tentacle Head Games have announced their single-player RTS game From Orbit will launch on August 27th.

    Confirming that date will include Linux support on Twitter, From Orbit will see you manage the crew of a small spaceship stranded in deep uncharted space. You will move from planet to planet as you attempt to find your way back home.

  • FOSS local multiplayer game Superstarfighter sees a great new release

    Superstarfighter is a FOSS local multiplayer game made with Godot Engine that continues to impress me and the latest update is out now with more great features.

    v0.5.0 released around a week ago adds in a new additional variant to the game modes, to add a snake-like feel where instead of launching bombs at your enemies, you need to get them to fly into your tail to take them out. It's a pretty fun mix-up actually!

  • The Group Stage for Dota 2's The International 2019 starts, as the prize pool continues breaking records

    The International 2019 is heating up for Dota 2 as The Group Stage has now officially begun and the community-driven prize pool has hit a new record-breaking high.

    The Group Stage going on now, with the second day starting around 1AM UTC Friday, is where you have two groups of nine teams and they face off against every other team in a best of two matchup. The top 4 teams advance onto the Upper Bracket of the Main Event, with the teams in 5th-8th place in each group advancing onto the Lower Bracket of the Main Event. The bottom team from each group is then eliminated!

  • Facepunch adjust their Linux plans for Rust, refunds being offered as it won't continue at all

    As an update to the Rust situation, Facepunch have now changed their plans for the Linux version. They've decided to offer refunds, as they won't continue it at all.

    Previously, their plan was to split the Linux version of Rust from Windows/Mac to at least give Linux owners a working game although without future feature updates. In the new blog post, written by Facepunch's Garry Newman, they "now realise how shit that would be" after talking to the community.

  • Survival game Stranded Deep has an absolutely huge update out now

    Stranded Deep, the survival game where you're marooned on a desert island after a plane crash just had its first major stable update in some time.

    Along with an impressive list of bug fixes, some big new features made it into this release. There's a new intro scene, a new main menu and loading visuals, a female character model with female voice-over, difficulty options when starting a game, stamina, player skills, sprint swimming for moving faster in water, multiple new sharks, multiple new shipwrecks and more. If you've not played for a while, there's a lot to look forward to when jumping into a new game.

Upgrade from Windows 7 to Ubuntu Part 2: Releases

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Knowing Ubuntu releases is important to understand it better. Ubuntu is released twice a year, more precisely, every April and October, hence the number 04 and 10 in every version. It has special release called Long Term Support (LTS) released once in two years, only when the year number is even, hence all LTS version numbers are ended with 04. More importantly, you will also see 3 different periods of Ubuntu Desktop, that have been going through GNOME2, Unity, and GNOME3 eras, with OpenOffice.org and then LibreOffice as the main office suite. You will also see Ubuntu siblings like Kubuntu and Mythbuntu. I hope this will be interesting enough for everybody to read. Go ahead, and learn more about Ubuntu!

Read more

Announcing Rust 1.37.0

Filed under
Development
Moz/FF

The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.37.0. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux-maker Red Hat Purchase Adds Risk to Owning IBM Stock

    Amid evolving technologies, IBM has to pivot again to remain relevant. It has attempted this feat by buying Red Hat. Investors are bailing out of the shares as integration of the Linux maker will take time. Given the time lag and the falling profits, owning the stock amounts to a gamble on whether management can successfully absorb Red Hat into the company.

  • FLOSS Weekly 542: Dancer

    Dancer is a web application framework for Perl. It was inspired by Sinatra and was written by Alexis Sukrieh originally.

    It has an intuitive, minimalist, and very expressive syntax: has PSGI support, plugins and its modular design allow for strong scalability: and Dancer depends on as few CPAN modules as possible, making it easy to install.

  • Biometrics of one million people discovered on publicly accessible database

    A biometrics database used by the police, banks and defence contractors has been discovered online unprotected, with the fingerprints and facial recognition scans unencrypted.

    Furthermore, the Biostar 2 database - used as part of security systems for warehouses and offices - also contained user names, passwords and other personal information. And the database was so exposed that data could easily be manipulated, and new accounts with corresponding biometrics added

  • Apple locked me out of its walled garden. It was a nightmare

    I started to realize just how far-reaching the effects of Apple disabling my account were. One of the things I love about Apple’s ecosystem is that I’ve built my media collection on iTunes, and can access it from any of my Apple devices. My partner and I have owned numerous iPods, iPhones, iPads, MacBooks, iMacs, Apple Watches, Apple TVs, and even a HomePod, over the years. Apple plays a big part in my professional life too: I’m the IT manager for Quartz, and we use Apple hardware and publish on Apple platforms.

    But when Apple locked my account, all of my devices became virtually unusable. At first, it seemed like a mild inconvenience, but I soon found out how many apps on my iOS and Mac devices couldn’t be updated, not to mention how I couldn’t download anything new. When I had to take a trip for a family emergency, the JetBlue app wouldn’t let me access my boarding pass, saying I had to update the app to use it. It was the first time I’d flown with a paper boarding pass in years. I couldn’t even pass time on the flight playing Animal Crossing on my phone, because I got a similar error message when I opened the game.

  • VMware says it’s looking to acquire Pivotal

    VMware today confirmed that it is in talks to acquire software development platform Pivotal Software, the service best known for commercializing the open-source Cloud Foundry platform. The proposed transaction would see VMware acquire all outstanding Pivotal Class A stock for $15 per share, a significant markup over Pivotal’s current share price (which unsurprisingly shot up right after the announcement).

  • VMware All Set To Acquire Pivotal
  • rideOS Launches New Devoted Platform to Power the Future of Ridehailing

today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos

GNOME Developers: Microsoft Stifling the Competition and GStreamer/Graphene

Filed under
GNOME
  • Musings on the Microsoft Component Firmware Update (CFU) Protocol

    CFU has a bazaar pre-download phase before sending the firmware to the microcontroller so the uC can check if the firmware is required and compatible. CFU also requires devices to be able to transfer the entire new transfer mode in runtime mode. The pre-download “offer” allows the uC to check any sub-components attached (e.g. other devices attached to the SoC) and forces it to do dep resolution in case sub-components have to be updated in a specific order.

    Pushing the dep resolution down to the uC means the uC has to do all the version comparisons and also know all the logic with regard to protocol incompatibilities. You could be in a position where the uC firmware needs to be updated so that it “knows” about the new protocol restrictions, which are needed to update the uC and the things attached in the right order in a subsequent update. If we always update the uC to the latest, the probably-factory-default running version doesn’t know about the new restrictions.

    The other issue with this is that the peripheral is unaware of the other devices in the system, so for instance couldn’t only install a new firmware version for only new builds of Windows for example. Something that we support in fwupd is being able to restrict the peripheral device firmware to a specific SMBIOS CHID or a system firmware vendor, which lets vendors solve the “same hardware in different chassis, with custom firmware” problem. I don’t see how that could be possible using CFU unless I misunderstand the new .inf features. All the dependency resolution should be in the metadata layer (e.g. in the .inf file) rather than being pushed down to the hardware running the old firmware.

  • Emmanuele Bassi: Another layer

    Five years (and change) ago I was looking at the data types and API that were needed to write a 3D-capable scene graph API; I was also learning about SIMD instructions and compiler builtins on IA and ARM, as well as a bunch of math I didn’t really study in my brush offs with formal higher education. The result was a small library called Graphene.

    Over the years I added more API, moved the build system from Autotools over to Meson, and wrote a whole separate library for its test suite.

    In the meantime, GStreamer started using Graphene in its GL element; GTK 3.9x is very much using Graphene internally and exposing it as public API; Mutter developers are working on reimplementing the various math types in their copies of Cogl and Clutter using Graphene; and Alex wrote an entire 3D engine using it.

PiVoyager is a UPS for the Raspberry Pi With a Real-Time Calendar Clock

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi is a powerful SBC (Single Board Computer), and aside from being used for everyday computing stuff, the Raspberry Pi can be embedded as the brain of various projects.

Read more

Server: Kata Containers in Tumbleweed, Ubuntu on 'Multi' 'Cloud', and Containers 101

Filed under
Server
  • Kubic Project: Kata Containers now available in Tumbleweed

    Kata Containers is an open source container runtime that is crafted to seamlessly plug into the containers ecosystem.

    We are now excited to announce that the Kata Containers packages are finally available in the official openSUSE Tumbleweed repository.

    It is worthwhile to spend few words explaining why this is a great news, considering the role of Kata Containers (a.k.a. Kata) in fulfilling the need for security in the containers ecosystem, and given its importance for openSUSE and Kubic.

  • Why multi-cloud has become a must-have for enterprises: six experts weigh in

    Remember the one-size-fits-all approach to cloud computing? That was five years ago. Today, multi-cloud architectures that use two, three, or more providers, across a mix of public and private platforms, are quickly becoming the preferred strategy at most companies.

    Despite the momentum, pockets of hesitation remain. Some sceptics are under the impression that deploying cloud platforms and services from multiple vendors can be a complex process. Others worry about security, regulatory, and performance issues.

  • Containers 101: Containers vs. Virtual Machines (And Why Containers Are the Future of IT Infrastructure)

    What exactly is a container and what makes it different -- and in some cases better -- than a virtual machine?

LiVES Video Editor 3.0 is Here With Significant Improvements

Filed under
Software

We recently covered a list of best open source video editors. LiVES is one of those open source video editors, available for free.

Even though a lot of users are still waiting for the release on Windows, a major update just popped up for LiVES Video Editor (i.e v3.0.1 as the latest package) on Linux. The new upgrade includes some new features and improvements.

Read more

Also: elfutils 0.177 released with eu-elfclassify

8 Ways Snaps are Different

Filed under
Ubuntu

Depending on the audience, the discussion of software packaging elicits very different responses. Users generally don’t care how software is packaged, so long as it works. Developers typically want software packaging as a task to not burden them and just magically happen. Snaps aren’t magic, but aim to achieve both ease of maintenance and transparency in use.

Most software packaging systems differ only a little in file format, tools used in their creation and methods of discovery and delivery. Snaps come with a set of side benefits beyond just delivering bytes in a compressed file to users. In this article, we’ll cover just 8 of the ways in which snaps improve upon existing Linux software packaging.

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System76’s First 4K OLED Linux Laptop is Here

Filed under
Gadgets

System76 launched its latest high-end Linux powered laptop – Adder WS.

System76 – the american computer manufacturer introduced the first 4K OLED Linux powered laptop. Named Adder WS, this device targets to the content creators, gamers and researchers who needs high performance hardware with Linux. Powered by Intel i9 series 8-core CPU and 64GB ram, this device includes a 15″ 4K OLED display with RTX 2070 graphics.

Read more

Linux Foundation: Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe and Cloud Native Computing Foundation Milestone

Filed under
OSS
  • Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe 2019 Schedule – October 28-30

    I may have just written about Linaro Connect San Diego 2019 schedule, but there's another interesting event that will also take place this fall...

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Reaches 100 End User Community Members

    "The End User Community is a crucial pillar of CNCF, providing feedback on projects, suggesting new projects, and ensuring the community remains vendor neutral," said Cheryl Hung, Director of Ecosystem at Cloud Native Computing Foundation. "We are hugely grateful for these member organizations and their commitment to the cloud native community, and look forward to continued growth in both the development and use of cloud native technologies."

Devices: Commell SBC, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Teensy and Linaro

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 8.6.0 Public Release

Version 8.6 basiert auf → Debian/stable (buster), mit einzelnen Paketen aus Debian/testing und unstable (sid) (v.a. Grafiktreiber und aktuelle Productivity-Software) und verwendet → Linux Kernel 5.2.5 sowie Xorg 7.7 (core 1.20.4) zur Unterstützung aktueller Computer-Hardware. Read more English: Knoppix 8.6 new public version is finally out !

Linux 5.3 Kernel Yielding The Best Performance Yet For AMD EPYC "Rome" CPU Performance

Among many different Linux/open-source benchmarks being worked on for the AMD EPYC "Rome" processors now that our initial launch benchmarks are out of the way are Linux distribution comparisons, checking out the BSD compatibility, and more. Some tests I wrapped up this weekend were seeing how recent Linux kernel releases perform on the AMD EPYC 7742 64-core / 128-thread processors. For some weekend analysis, here are benchmarks of Linux 4.18 through Linux 5.3 in its current development form. All tests were done on the same AMD EPYC 7742 2P server running Ubuntu 19.04 and using the latest kernels in each series via the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA. Read more

Fedora 29 to 30 upgrade - How it went

Alas, my Fedora 30 experience started strong with the first review and soured since. The test on the old laptop with Nvidia graphics highlighted numerous problems, including almost ending up in an unbootable state due to the wrong driver version being selected by the software center. With the in-vivo upgrade, I almost ended up in a similar state due to some incompatibility with extensions. I wasn't pleased by other glitches and errors, and the performance improvement margin isn't as stellar as the clean install test. All in all, Fedora 30 feels like a rather buggy release, with tons of problems. I think versions 27 to 29 were quite robust overall, at least the Gnome version, but the latest edition is quite rough. That would mean I'd advise people upgrading to take care of their data, remember the possible snags like extensions, and triple check their hardware is up to the task, because apparently QA isn't cool anymore, and no one else will do this for you. All in all, Fedora 30 is very bleeding edge, finicky, definitely not for everyday use by ordinary desktop folks. It's a dev tool for devs, so if you want something stable and boring, search elsewhere. Read more

Neptune 6.0 Released, Which is based on Debian 10 (Buster)

Leszek has pleased to announce the release of the new stable release of Neptune 6.0 on 1th Aug, 2019. It’s first stable release of Neptune 6.0 based on Debian 10 “Buster”, featuring the KDE Plasma desktop with the typical Neptune tweaks and configurations. The base of the system is Linux Kernel in version 4.19.37 which provides the necessary hardware support. Plasma 5.14.5 features the stable and flexible KDE made desktop that is loved by millions. Read more