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Tuesday, 25 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2019 - 4:13pm
Story Glen Barber: Statement regarding employment change and roles in the [FreeBSD] Project Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2019 - 3:35pm
Story There's A Professional Grade Digital Cinema Camera Powered By Linux Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2019 - 3:30pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 24/06/2019 - 3:03pm
Story One Mix Yoga 3 mini laptop demostrated running Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 24/06/2019 - 2:34pm
Story Security: Curl, Fedora, Windows and More Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2019 - 2:31pm
Story Drawpile 2.1.11 release Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2019 - 2:05pm
Story Audiocasts/Shows: Going Linux, Linux Action News, TechSNAP, GNU World Order, Linux in the Ham Shack, Python Podcast Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2019 - 1:54pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2019 - 1:46pm
Story Linux Package Managers Compared – AppImage vs Snap vs Flatpak Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2019 - 1:40pm

Stable kernels 5.1.13, 5.1.14, 4.19.54, 4.19.55, 4.14.129, 4.9.183, and 4.4.183

Filed under
Linux

Ubuntu 19.10 Dropping 32-bit Support Leaves Developers Fuming

Filed under
News

There will be no 32-bit support at all in Ubuntu 19.10. This is problematic for developers of Wine and Steam and gaming on Ubuntu might be in trouble.
Read more

Open Source Slack Alternative Mattermost Gets $50M Funding

Filed under
OSS

Mattermost, which presents itself as an open source alternative to Slack raised $50M in series B funding. This is definitely something to get excited for.

Slack is a cloud-based team collaboration software that is mainly used for internal team communication. Enterprises, startups and even open source projects worldwide use it interact with colleagues and project members. Slack is free with limited features while the paid enterprise version has premium features.

Slack is valued at $20 billion in June, 2019. You can guess the kind of impact it has made in the tech industry and certainly more products are trying to compete with Slack.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Important, but obscure, sysadmin tool osquery gets a foundation of its own

    But users think osquery's founder, Facebook, has been neglecting osquery. Going forward, Facebook has turned osquery over to The Linux Foundation. There, engineers and developers from Dactiv, Facebook, Google, Kolide, Trail of Bits, Uptycs, and other companies invested in osquery, will support it under the new foundation: The osquery Foundation.

    That's a good thing because while you may not have heard of osquery, many major companies, such as Airbnb, Dropbox, Netflix, Palantir, Etsy, and Uber, rely on it. This project needed a new lease on life.

    How does it work? Osquery exposes server operating system as a high-performance relational database. This allows you to write SQL-based queries to explore operating system data and low level system information. In osquery, SQL tables represent abstract concepts such as running processes, loaded kernel modules, open network connections, browser plugins, hardware events or file hashes.These are kept in a SQLite DBMS.

  • Running Ubuntu on the One Mix Yoga 3 mini laptop (video)

    The One Mix Yoga 3 is a small laptop that features an 8.4 inch touchscreen display and a convertible tablet-style design. It ships with Windows 10, but one of the first things I tried doing with the tablet was to boot a GNU/Linux distribution.

    I posted some notes about what happened when I took Ubuntu 19.04 for a spin on the One Mix 3 Yoga in my first-look article, but plenty of folks who watched my first look video on YouTube asked for a video… so I made one of those too.

  • Cockroach and the Source Available Future [Ed: The proprietary software giants-funded pundits like PedMonk on the openwashing agenda ("Source Available"... like "Shared Source" or "Inner Source"). What a crock.]

    Earlier this month, the database company Cockroach Labs relicensed its flagship database product. This is notable for two reasons. Most obviously, the company is following in the footsteps of several of its commercial open source database peers such as Confluent, Elastic, MongoDB, Redis Labs and TimescaleDB that have felt compelled to apply licenses that are neither open source nor, in most cases, traditionally proprietary.

    But the relicensing of CockroachDB is also interesting because this isn’t the first time the company has applied such a license.

    In January of 2017, Cockroach Labs announced the introduction of what it called the CockroachDB Community License (CCL). To the company’s credit, in the post announcing this new license, it took pains to make it clear that the CCL, while making source code available, was not in fact an open source license because it restricted redistribution. The CCL essentially enforced a two tier, open core-type business model, in which a base version of the database was made available under a permissive open source license (Apache) while certain enterprise features were made available under the CCL, which essentially requires users of these premium, enterprise-oriented features to pay for them.

    With its recent relicensing, the original dual core model has been deprecated. Moving forward, CockroachDB will be made available under two non-open source licenses – which, as an aside to Cockroach, presumably means that section 1B of the CCL probably needs to be updated. The CCL will continue to govern the premium featureset, but the original open source codebase will moving forward be governed by the Business Source License (BSL). Originally released by MariaDB, the BSL is a source available license; a license that makes source code for a project available, but places more restrictions upon its usage than is permitted by open source licenses.

  • Welcoming the newest Collaborans!

    For many, June 21, day of the Solstice, is a day of celebrations. At Collabora, we're also celebrating, as we take a moment to welcome all the newest members of our engineering and administration teams who've joined over the last year!

    Comprised of some of the most motivated and active Open Source contributors and maintainers around the world, Collaborans share an enduring passion for technology and Open Source, and these new joiners are no different.

Security FUD and Distraction From NSA Back Doors

Filed under
Security
  • Linux Cryptominer Uses Virtual Machines to Attack Windows, macOS [Ed: This is simply malware that people download and install on their machines, but hey, let's blame something else on "Linux"]

    A new cryptocurrency mining malware dubbed LoudMiner uses virtualization software to deploy a Linux XMRig coinminer variant on Windows and macOS systems via a Tiny Core Linux virtual machine.

  • Report confirms shift of botnet attack focus to Linux, IoT [Ed: A 'report' shifts focus from Microsoft Windows back doors (which are causing huge damage at the moment) to "Linux" (usually just machine with default password unchanged)]
  • Botnets shift from Windows towards Linux and IoT platforms [Ed: Microsoft money has poisoned and polluted corporate media (advertising money) to the point each time it covers "Linux" it's either a story about Linux being dangerous or a story about Vista 10 (WeaSeL)]
  • Free proxy service found running on top of 2,600+ hacked WordPress sites [Ed: Considering there are many millions of WordPress sites, many of which aren't patching properly, this is only expected and it's the fault of their administrators]
  • Four CVEs Describe SACKs of Linux and FreeBSD Vulnerabilities [Ed: When searching news for "Linux" these days almost half the results are about security because corporate media chooses to focus on nothing else, even obsessing over the same story for weeks]

    Four new CVEs present issues that have a potential DoS impact on almost every Linux user.

  • Remote Desktop Protocol

    As with any piece of software, bugs arise sooner or later. A critical security exploit allowing a man-in-the-middle- style attack was discovered in RDP version 5.2. In 2012, another critical vulnerability was discovered to allow a Windows computer to be compromised by unauthenticated clients. Version 6.1, found in Windows Server 2008, revealed a critical exploit that harvested user credentials. More recently, an exploit discovered in March 2018 allowed remote code execution attack and another credential- harvesting scenario.

Linux Hardware: Intel and Qualcomm

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Intel Drops 2 Exciting Clues About The Future Of Clear Linux OS For 'Normal' Desktop Users [Ed: Intel is still trying, more desperately over time, to generate interest in its flailing GNU/Linux distro while putting back doors in every chip and doing other profoundly dubious things]

    I'm not a developer, a server administrator or anyone with advanced programming skills. I'm just a normal desktop Linux user who appreciates speed, stability, great aesthetics and ease of use. As such I've been keeping a close eye on Intel's Clear Linux, and have been insisting it's worth paying attention to. Intel's recent community efforts around Clear Linux -- and even certain touches they've implemented to the installer -- have given me the strong belief that the company is looking to serve people just like me in the near future. So I asked the burning question directly, and Intel just answered it.

  • Touch panel PCs offer a choice of 64 models mixing different sizes and Intel chips

    Taicenn’s Linux-friendly, IP65 protected “TPC-DCM” industrial panel PCs let you choose between 6th or 7th Gen U-series Core, Apollo Lake, or Bay Trail CPUs with 2x GbE, SATA, optional wireless, and capacitive touchscreens between 15 and 24 inches.

    Taicenn, which last year introduced an Intel Bay Trail based, in-vehicle TPC-DCXXXC1E panel PC has now returned with an industrial series of TPC-DCM panel PCs. You can choose between 64 configurations, with 8x Intel processor choices and 8x screen sizes: 15.0, 2x 15.6, 17.0, 18.5, 19.0, 21.5 and 24.0-inch models ranging from 1024 x 768 to 1920 x 1080 pixels.

  • Three Linux router boards showcase Qualcomm IPQ4019

    Three router SBCs that run Linux on Qualcomm’s quad -A7 IPQ4019 have reached market: The Dakota DR4019 with 2x GbE, optional SFP and Wave2 WiFi, MikroTik’s RB450Gx4 with 5x GbE and PoE, and a $200 Kefu DB11 dev kit.

KDE: Latte, Plasma Vision and GSoC

Filed under
KDE
  • Latte and "Flexible" settings...

    Following Latte and a "Shared Layouts" dream, today I am going to present you all the new settings pages for upcoming v0.9 and the approach used for them. In following screenshots you can find Basic and Advanced pages for docks and panels.

  • Plasma Vision

    The Plasma Vision got written a couple years ago, a short text saying what Plasma is and hopes to create and defines our approach to making a useful and productive work environment for your computer. Because of creative differences it was never promoted or used properly but in my quest to make KDE look as up to date in its presence on the web as it does on the desktop I’ve got the Plasma sprinters who are meeting in Valencia this week to agree to adding it to the KDE Plasma webpage.

  • Day 26

    I’m in the end of my semester at college, so I need to split my time with GSoC and my college tasks, so now I’m going slowly but on the next month I have my vacation and I’ll have all of my time dedicated to it.
    My menthors have helped me a lot so far, and I would like to say thanks for the patience, and say sorry for KDE for my initial project and for waste the first weeks on a thing that didn’t produce anything.

  • LabPlot getting prettier and also support for online datasets

    Hello everyone! I'm participating in Google Summer of Code for the second time. I'm working on KDE's LabPlot, just like last year. I'm very happy that I can work again with my former and current mentor Kristóf Fábián, and with Alexander Semke, an invaluable member of the LabPlot team, who is like a second mentor to me.

    [...]

    We had to create metadata files in order to record additional information about datasets, and also to divide them into categories and subcategories. We use a metadata data file which contains every category and subcategory and a list of datasets for every subcategory. Additionally there is a metadata file for every dataset containing various data about the dataset itself.

    In the "Datasets" section we highlight every dataset the metadata of which is locally available (in the labplot directory located in the user's home directory). When the user clicks on the "Clear cache" button every file is deleted from the above mentioned directory. The "Refresh" button provides the possibility to refresh the locally available metadata file, which contains the categories and subcategories.
    In order to make possible the import of datasets into LabPlot, and saving them into Spreadsheets I had to implement a helper class: DatasetHandler. This class processes a dataset's metadata file, configures the Spreadsheet into which the data will be loaded, downloads the dataset, processes it (based on the preferences present in the metadata file) then loads its content into the spreadsheet.

Video and Events: foss-north, KubeCon+CloudNativeCon, Fedora and Python

Filed under
OSS
  • More foss in the north

    This year, midsummer is on June 21, which marks four months from the first foss-north event outside of Gothenburg. That’s right – foss-north is going to Stockholm on October 21 and the theme will be IoT and Security. Make sure to save the date!

    We have a venue and three great speakers lined up. There will be a CFP during July and the final speakers will be announced towards September. We’re also looking for sponsors (hint hint nudge nudge).

    Now I’m off to enjoy the last hour of midsummer and enjoy the shortest night of the year. Take care and I’ll see you in Stockholm this autumn!

  • Open Source, Digital Transformation And Grape Up: Roman Swoszowski

    We sat down with Roman Swoszowski, co-founder and VP of Cloud R&D at Grape Up to get a better grip of the problems companies face and how Grape Up help these companies using Open Source technologies.

  • Pooja Yadav: Fedora Pune Meetup

    Last Saturday(June,15) , we had Fedora Pune Meetup with Fedora-30 release celebration. When I reached the venue, people were already present there and were ready to start the event. We started according to the agenda with our first talk from Pravin Satpute on Fedora-30 features which was great, as people were really interested in knowing the new features added.

  • Talk Python to Me: #217 Notebooks vs data science-enabled scripts

    On this episode, I meet up with Rong Lu and Katherine Kampf from Microsoft while I was at BUILD this year. We cover a bunch of topics around data science and talk about two opposing styles of data science development and related tooling: Notebooks vs Python code files and editors.

  • Montreal Python User Group: Montréal-Python 75: Funky Urgency

    The summer has started and it's time for our last edition before the seasonal break. We are inviting you for the occasion at our friends Anomaly, a co-working space in the Mile-End.

    As usual, it's gonna be an opportunity to discover how people are pushing our favourite language farther, to understand how to identify bad habit of most programmers and to have fun with data!

    Join us on Wednesday, there's gonna be pizza and we're probably gonna continue the evening to share more about our latest discoveries.

today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos

Debian vs. Ubuntu: Best Linux Distro for Laptops, Desktops, and Servers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

There is a seemingly endless list of distributions to choose from if you’re interested in Linux. That said, one of the most popular distributions is Ubuntu. If you’ve heard of Linux, chances are you’ve heard of Ubuntu.

You may have heard that Ubuntu is based on another distribution, Debian. Which one should you choose? Is it a matter of preference, or is easy distribution better suited to different use cases?

Read more

AMD Navi and Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • More AMD Navi GPUs show up in a Linux driver

    A since-deleted commit for a Linux driver update hints at 4 new AMD Navi GPUs.

  • Libdrm Picks Up Support For AMD Navi

    As another one of the prerequisites for landing the AMD Radeon RX 5000 series "Navi" support in Mesa, the libdrm bits have just been merged.

    Libdrm is the Mesa DRM library that is needed for sitting between the Linux kernel Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) interfaces and the user-space components (depending upon the driver, as is required by like RadeonSI). Libdrm also ends up being used by the DDX drivers like xf86-video-amdgpu and other components as well depending upon the driver. As of a short time ago, the Navi bits landed in libdrm Git.

    The Navi support here isn't all that exciting and mostly boilerplate code for a new generation for a new family ID, a new member for a tile steering override for GFX10, GDDR6 as a new video memory type, and the largest addition is simply the new tests for VCN 2.0 video decode support.

Fedora 30 Elections Results

Filed under
Red Hat

The Fedora 30 election cycle has concluded. Here are the results for each election. Congratulations to the winning candidates, and thank you all candidates for running in this election!

Read more

You Can Now Buy Linux Notebooks Powered by Zorin OS from Star Labs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The makers of the Zorin OS Linux operating system announced today that they partnered with a computer manufacturer to offer users notebooks powered by Zorin OS.

The wait is over, as Zorin OS has partnered with Star Labs, a UK-based computer manufacturer specialised in selling Linux-powered notebooks, to offer you two new laptops running the latest version of Zorin OS, fully customized and optimised for these powerful and slick notebooks.

"Creating a Linux desktop experience that’s accessible to everyone has always been our mission at Zorin OS," reads today's announcement. "Today we’re taking the next step in this mission by making Zorin OS easier for the masses to access: on new computers powered by Zorin OS."

Read more

Release of Wine 4.11

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 4.11 is now available.
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - Updated version of the Mono engine, including Windows.Forms.
      - More DLLs are built as PE files by default.
      - Faster implementation of Slim Reader/Writer locks on Linux.
      - Initial support for enumerating display devices.
      - Various bug fixes.
  • Whose Wine is it anyway? Wine 4.11 is out

    It's not quite the the Wine o'clock news but it will do, Wine 4.11 is officially out. The Wine team continues progressing on and it's looking tasty.

  • Wine 4.11 Brings Ability To Enumerate Display Devices, Updated Mono

    Wine 4.11 is out tonight as the latest bi-weekly development release for running Windows games/applications on Linux and other platforms.

    With Wine 4.11 is initial support for enumerating display devices. In particular, a Xinerama display device handler is added to the Wine X11 driver and the ability to handle display device changes.

    Wine 4.11 also ships with an updated version of the Mono engine, more DLLs are now built as PE files by default (continuing a recent trend), there is a faster implementation of slim reader/write locks on Linux, and various bug fixes.

FreeBSD 11.3-RC2 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The second RC build of the 11.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 11.3-RC2 amd64 GENERIC
o 11.3-RC2 i386 GENERIC
o 11.3-RC2 powerpc GENERIC
o 11.3-RC2 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 11.3-RC2 sparc64 GENERIC
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 BANANAPI
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 BEAGLEBONE
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 CUBIEBOARD
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 CUBIEBOARD2
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 RPI-B
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 RPI2
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 PANDABOARD
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 WANDBOARD
o 11.3-RC2 aarch64 GENERIC

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/11.3/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/11.3" branch.

A summary of changes since 11.3-RC1 includes:

o Updates to the ixl(4) and ixlv(4) drivers.

A list of changes since 11.2-RELEASE is available in the releng/11.3
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/11.3R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 11.3-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/11.3-RC2/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-091a9d377d956c519
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0fa381eb7dd65b236
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0888c48fcbc7ec3b9
  eu-west-2 region: ami-01d9ee1b7ba0aaf87
  eu-west-1 region: ami-072313e0a896f9fc3
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-081a9854f2575823e
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-027ab7629095b2419
  sa-east-1 region: ami-0ed1e9346b072b7fa
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0effcf973bbde0b80
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-06fc8fd0e39f4a6e8
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0e68f9d80df9828aa
  eu-central-1 region: ami-042016143d5bf5261
  us-east-1 region: ami-0ad4a06d874497067
  us-east-2 region: ami-0efb20b4a888c1bd1
  us-west-1 region: ami-0b5b96c925cec68fe
  us-west-2 region: ami-0f672651aa001cc97

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-11.3-RC2
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 11.3-RC2

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Red Hat: Fedora BoF at Red Hat Summit, Volume Cloning Alpha for Kubernetes, Dell/EMC

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora BoF at Red Hat Summit

    Every year, Red Hat holds a conference for customers, partners, and open source contributors — Red Hat Summit.This year’s was last month, in Boston, Massachusetts, and of course Fedora was there. We had our booth in the “Community Central” area of the expo floor, and ran a birds-of-a-feather (BoF) session for open discussion with community members. I was joined by Brian Exelbierd, Ben Cotton, Adam Šamalík, and a dozen members of the Fedora community.

    We used a “lean coffee” format to drive the topics, letting the attendees propose and vote on what we discussed. (It’s basically the same format we use for Fedora Council’s open floor meetings, but in person rather than via IRC.) I expected a lot of questions about the new features of Fedora 30, which was released eight days before. But the community members who came to the BoF seemed pretty well-informed on this. Instead, the most-voted topic was Fedora Modularity.

  • Introducing Volume Cloning Alpha for Kubernetes

    Kubernetes v1.15 introduces alpha support for volume cloning. This feature allows you to create new volumes using the contents of existing volumes in the user’s namespace using the Kubernetes API.

  • How Dell EMC and Red Hat work together on joint solutions

    From virtualization and cloud to enterprise IT optimization and performance, Red Hat and Dell EMC deliver open, cost-effective and highly reliable solutions. Our jointly designed and architected solutions blend the best of Red Hat technology with Dell EMC’s customer-driven innovation to create solutions and services that address real-world needs.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

KDE Plasma 5.16.2 Desktop Environment Released with More Than 30 Bug Fixes

Coming just one week after the first point release, the KDE Plasma 5.16.2 maintenance update is here to add yet another layer of bug fixes with the ultimate goal to make the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment more stable and reliable for users. In particular, this second point release introduces a total of 34 changes across various core components and apps. "Today KDE releases a bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.16.2. Plasma 5.16 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds a week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important," reads today's announcement. Read more Also: Plasma 5.16.2

Stable kernels 5.1.15, 4.19.56, and 4.14.130

  • Linux 5.1.15
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.15 kernel. All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
  • Linux 4.19.56
  • Linux 4.14.130

Introducing people.kernel.org

Ever since the demise of Google+, many developers have expressed a desire to have a service that would provide a way to create and manage content in a format that would be more rich and easier to access than email messages sent to LKML. Today, we would like to introduce people.kernel.org, which is an ActivityPub-enabled federated platform powered by WriteFreely and hosted by very nice and accommodating folks at write.as. Read more