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Friday, 23 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story ut2004 Update Out srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:00am
Story Coolest Homepage Yet! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:00am
Story IBM Sets Its Sights on Linux Software srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:59am
Story Review of PCLOS srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:24am
Story The Myth of Linux Security srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:39am
Story M$ Plans more Secure Browser :roll: srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:38am
Story Whoops: KDE fliccd Buffer Overflow Vulnerabilities srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:30am
Story Study Find Open Source More Secure srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:36am
Story Interview with Bill Gates srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:36am
Story Security Showdown: Back & Forth srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:35am

7 Great Linux Statistical Analysis Tools

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
Sci/Tech

Science is the effort of seeking to comprehend how the physical world works. From observation and experimentation, science uses physical evidence of natural phenomena to compile data and analyze the collated information.

In modern research it is essential for scientists to keep abreast of the latest statistical software. Just like the fast moving world of research, developments in statistical software and methods continue to abound. Making full use of the improvements in computer software helps to advance the pace of research.

Science really prospers and advances when individuals share the results of their experiments with others in the scientific community. There is a certain logic that scientific software should therefore be released in a freely distributable environment.

Linux is particularly strong in the field of open source statistical software. The purpose of this article is to identify software for performing statistical analysis. This type of software helps to summarize data in a shorter form, and helps scientists understand a concept or representation and make possible predictions based on this understanding.

Read more

Programming: Datasets for Credit Risk Modeling, Qt Designer, Refactoring to Multiple Exit Points, LLVM Clang Compiler

Filed under
Development
  • Datasets for Credit Risk Modeling

    This tutorial outlines several free publicly available datasets which can be used for credit risk modeling. In banking world, credit risk is a critical business vertical which makes sure that bank has sufficient capital to protect depositors from credit, market and operational risks. During the process, its role is to work for bank in compliance to central bank regulations.

  • Embedding PyQtGraph (or any other custom PyQt5 widgets) from Qt Designer

    Qt Designer is a great tool for designing PyQt5 GUIs, allowing you to use the entire range of Qt5 widgets and layouts to construct your apps. As your applications get more complex however you may find yourself creating custom widgets, or using PyQt5 libraries such as PyQtGraph, who's widgets are not available within Designer.

    Helpfully, Qt Designer supports a mechanism for using placeholder widgets to represent your custom or external widgets in your design. This tutorial will walk you through the process of using placeholders to include a PyQtGraph plot in your app from within Qt Designer.

  • Refactoring to Multiple Exit Points

    Functions should have only a single entry point. We all agree on that. But some people also argue that functions should have a single exit that returns the value. More people don't seem to care enough about how their functions are organized. I think that makes functions a lot more complicated than they have to be. So let's talk about function organization and how multiple exit points can help.

  • Sony Continues Tuning AMD Jaguar Support Within The LLVM Clang Compiler

    Thanks to Sony using LLVM Clang as their default compiler toolchain for their PlayStation game console, they continue making improvements to the AMD Btver2/Jaguar code for optimized performance. The Jaguar APU is what's in the current PlayStation 4 while we've already seen contributions from Sony to improve the Zen CPU support ahead of their next-generation console.

    Just this week was the newest contribution to the Jaguar/Btver2 target code within the LLVM compiler stack. This most recent addition is fixing the latency and throughput of CMPXCHG instructions. These improvements should yield better generated code around those instructions.

Runtu XFCE 18.04.3 Released, Which is Based on Ubuntu Bionic Beaver 18.04.3 LTS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Hsh has announced the release of Runtu 18.04.3, it’s third maintenance update of Runtu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) LTS, which is based on the package release base of Bionic Beaver 18.04.3 LTS.

It features full support of Russian localization and a set of pre-installed software, which make sure you to run the system smoothly.

Also, backported few of the packages from Ubuntu 19.04 for better improvements.

It’s backported Linux kernel version 5.0 and the graphics stack components, and the package database.

Read more

Graphics: AMD Publishes New RDNA Whitepaper and Mesa 19.2.0 RC1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Publishes New RDNA Whitepaper

    AMD's new RDNA whitepaper goes into detail explaining the efficiency and programming optimizations of this new design while retaining backwards compatibility with the GCN architecture. The 25-page read also covers True Audio Next, the Radeon Multimedia/Display Engines, caches, SIMD units, and other modern bits to these new Radeon graphics processors.

  • mesa 19.2.0-rc1
    The first release candidate for Mesa 19.2.0 is now available.
    
    The plan is to have one release candidate every Tuesday, until the
    anticipated final release on 10th September 2019.
    
    The expectation is that the 19.1 branch will remain alive with bi-weekly
    releases until the 19.2.1 release.
    
    In the path to 19.2.0 release, there is a tracker bug for the
    regressions found since 19.1:
    https://bugs.freedesktop.org/show_bug.cgi?id=111444
    
    Here are the people which helped shape the current release.
    
  • Mesa 19.2-RC1 Released But Intel Still Looking To Add OpenGL 4.6 Support

    Yesterday we shared that Mesa 19.2's release process would finally be getting underway with the first release candidate expected today following the code branching. Sure enough, that process began but now prominent Intel open-source graphics developer Jason Ekstrand is looking to get the OpenGL 4.6 support into this release.

    Mesa 19.2 release manager Emil Velikov branched the Mesa 19.2 code from master this evening followed by creating the first release candidate. Mesa 19.2-rc1 is now available and the plan is to issue new release candidates every week until the official release is ready to ship. Assuming they close their blocker bugs on time, the hope is to officially release Mesa 19.2.0 on 10 September.

Librem 5 August Update

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
Gadgets

We are preparing everything for the Librem 5 to be delivered soon, and its software will focus on the most critical applications a phone needs: calls, messages and web browsing. There are supporting projects that will be delivered too, like GNOME Settings, the shell, GNOME Initial Setup, and GNOME Contacts. So without further ado, let’s take a tour through the software we will deliver–as well as some other applications that have seen some major changes.

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low-memory-monitor: new project announcement

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

I'll soon be flying to Greece for GUADEC but wanted to mention one of the things I worked on the past couple of weeks: the low-memory-monitor project is off the ground, though not production-ready.

low-memory-monitor, as its name implies, monitors the amount of free physical memory on the system and will shoot off signals to interested user-space applications, usually session managers, or sandboxing helpers, when that memory runs low, making it possible for applications to shrink their memory footprints before it's too late either to recover a usable system, or avoid taking a performance hit.

It's similar to Android's lowmemorykiller daemon, Facebook's oomd, Endless' psi-monitor, amongst others

Read more

Also: New Low-Memory-Monitor Project Can Help With Linux's RAM/Responsiveness Problem

IBM: Kubernetes/OpenShift, OpenPOWER, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Developers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Integration delivers new Kubernetes Operators and expands data integration capabilities with latest release

    We are pleased to announce the Q3 release of Red Hat Integration, which brings us further in our alignment around Red Hat OpenShift as the platform of choice for developing and deploying cloud-native applications across hybrid cloud environments, as well as helping customers get their integrations up and running easier and faster.

    As modern IT continues its rapid evolution, it becomes important that the cloud-native solutions supporting this transformation keep pace, enabling IT organizations to truly benefit from this constant innovation. To help customers take full advantage of this, we've updated, tested and certified every single component in Red Hat Integration with the latest version of OpenShift: Red Hat OpenShift 4.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces New Open Hardware Technologies and Collaboration

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced that the OpenPOWER Foundation will become a project hosted at The Linux Foundation. The project includes IBM’s open POWER Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) and contributed Source Design Implementations required to support data-driven hardware for intensive workloads like Artificial Intelligence (AI).

    OpenPOWER is the open steward for the Power Architecture and has the support of 350 members, including IBM, Google, Inspur Power Systems, Yadro, Hitachi, Wistron, Mellanox, NVIDIA, and Red Hat.

    The governance model within the Linux Foundation gives software developers assurance of compatibility while developing AI and hybrid cloud native applications that take advantage of POWER’s rich feature set and open compute hardware and software ecosystems.

    As the demand rises for more and more compute-intensive workloads like AI and in-memory analytics, commodity systems vendors have struggled with the looming predictions of the end of Moore’s Law. Central processing units (CPUs) may no longer handle the rising demands alone, and data-centric systems are built to maximize the flow of data between CPUs and attached devices for specialized workloads. By hosting OpenPOWER at The Linux Foundation, a cross-project, cross-community collaboration, it will accelerate development of hardware and software to support data-centric systems, by making it available to a growing global audience.

    “The OpenPOWER community has been doing critical work to support the increasing demands of enterprises that are using big data for AI and machine learning workloads. The move to bring these efforts together with the worldwide ecosystem of open source developers across projects at The Linux Foundation will unleash a new level of innovation by giving developers everywhere more access to the tools and technologies that will define the next generation of POWER architecture,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation.

  • Raptor Computing Systems Planning To Launch New ATX POWER9 Board With OpenCAPI

    In addition to the news out of the OpenPOWER Summit in San Diego that the POWER ISA is going open-source and the OpenPOWER Foundation becoming part of the Linux Foundation, Raptor Computing Systems shared they plan to launch a new standard ATX motherboard next year that will feature OpenCAPI connectivity.

    Built off the successes of their Talos II high-end server motherboard and lower-cost Blackbird desktop motherboard designs, there is apparently a new motherboard design for POWER9 being worked on that could launch in early 2020.

  • Why you should be developing on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    With a $0 Red Hat Developer membership, you get access to Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) at no cost. We have downloads available for RHEL versions starting as far back as 7.2, and as current as RHEL 8.1 Beta. The subscription costs nothing, and there are no additional costs for any of the software or content we make available through the program.

Proprietary Browsers Released: Opera 63 and Vivaldi 2.7

Filed under
Software
Web
  • Opera 63 initial release

    Today, we are releasing the first browser from the 63 line. Opera 63 comes with an improved private browsing mode.

  • Opera 63 Released with Improved Private Mode

    Opera web browser 63 was released a day ago with improved private browsing mode.

  • Vivaldi Web Browser 2.7 Released with Better Sound Control

    Vivaldi web browser 2.7 was released today. The new version features better sound controls, smoother navigation and overall improvements.

  • Vivaldi 2.7 : Bring more productivity to your day

    We’re happy to be back in the saddle after the summer break! We want Vivaldi to be the perfect tool for you to control and enjoy the digital aspect of your lives.

    And that’s why we are working on the things that count – the things that make you more productive and organised on the Web.

    The new update has little gems that will give you a better control of sound behavior in Vivaldi. In addition, you have new options to access user profiles quicker, an enhanced status bar as well as overall improvements and security related fixes.

Introducing the XPS 13 developer edition, 9th generation

Filed under
Ubuntu

Today we’d like to announce that the new XPS 13 developer edition (7390) will soon be available in the US, Canada and Europe. The new developer edition, based on Intel’s 10th Gen Core™ U series processors, is part of Dell’s new consumer PC portfolio that is being unveiled today.

These systems represent the 9th generation of the XPS 13 developer edition and will come with the Killer™ AX1650 (2×2) built on Intel WiFi 6 Chipset. The new 7390 systems will co-exist alongside the current 9380 XPS 13 developer edition.

Read more

Also: Dell Unveils New XPS 13 Developer Edition Ubuntu Laptop with 10th Gen Intel CPUs

Dell XPS 7390 Developer Edition Announced - Intel Comet Lake With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Security: Patches, Security Flaws Caused by Compiler Optimisations, Microsoft Updates Break Windows Again

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (ghostscript, pango, and squirrelmail), openSUSE (libcryptopp, squid, tcpdump, and wireshark), SUSE (flatpak), and Ubuntu (giflib and NLTK).

  • Security flaws caused by compiler optimizations

    An optimizing compiler is one that tries to maximize some attribute(s) of an executable program at the expense of other attribute(s). Usually the goal is to improve performance or code size at the expense of compiler time and the possibility to debug the program at a later stage. Most modern compilers support some sort of optimization. Normally code optimized for performance is the usual preference. In cases where space is a constraint like embedded systems, developers also prefer code optimized for size.

    Code optimization is both an art as well as a science. Various compilers use different techniques for optimizing code.

  • To patch Windows or not: Do you want BlueKeep bug or broken Visual Basic apps?

    Microsoft says apps that use Visual Basic 6 (VB6), VBA, and VBScript "may stop responding with error" after its updates from this Tuesday have been installed.

    "After installing this update, applications that were made using Visual Basic 6 (VB6), macros using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), and scripts or apps using Visual Basic Scripting Edition (VBScript) may stop responding and you may receive an 'invalid procedure call error'," Microsoft says.

    The issue affects all supported versions of Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and their corresponding server versions.

    "Microsoft is presently investigating this issue and will provide an update when available," the company said.

    Microsoft didn't offer an explanation for the problem but it did flag earlier this month that it will move ahead with sunsetting VBScript, by disabling it in IE11 by default via an update in this week's patch.

    "The change to disable VBScript will take effect in the upcoming cumulative updates for Windows 7, 8, and 8.1 on August 13, 2019," Microsoft warned in a blog. The change brought these versions of Windows in line with Windows 10.

Latest Debian GNU/Linux Security Patch Addresses 14 Vulnerabilities, Update Now

Filed under
Linux
Security

Available for the Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" and Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series, the new Linux kernel security update addresses a total of 14 vulnerabilities discovered by various security researchers. The Debian Project urges all users to update their installations as soon as possible.

Among the security flaws patched, we can mention a race condition in the libsas subsystem that supports Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) devices, a potential double-free in the block subsystem, as well as two issues that could make it easier for attackers to exploit other vulnerabilities.

Read more

Endeavour OS | Review from an openSUSE User

Filed under
Reviews

Endeavour OS is the unofficial successor to Antegros, I’ve never used Antegros so I cannot make any comparisons between the two. It should also be noted that I think Arch Linux, in general is more work than it is worth so this won’t exactly be a shining review. Feel free to bail here if you don’t like the direction of my initial prejudice.

I am reviewing Endeavour OS as a rather biased openSUSE Linux user that is firmly entrenched in all things openSUSE. I am going at this from the perspective that my computer is my companion, my coworker or assistant in getting my digital work done and some entertainment sprinkled in there as well.

Bottom Line Up Front: If you want to run main-line Arch, Endeavour OS is absolutely the way to get going with it. They take the “Easy Plus One” approach to Arch by allowing you to install what I would consider a minimal but very usable base and learn to use “genuine Arch” with all the triumphs and pitfalls. If you want to go Arch, I can most certainly endorse this as the route to do so. However, even after playing here for two weeks, I find Arch to be more trouble than it is worth but a great educational experience.

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Eclipse is Now a Module on Fedora 30

Filed under
Red Hat

From Fedora 30 onwards, Eclipse will be available as a module for Fedora Modularity.

This shows that Eclipse 2019-06 is available to install with three different profiles from which to choose. Each profile will install the Eclipse IDE and a curated set of plug-ins for accomplishing specific tasks.

java -- This is the default profile and will install everything you need to start developing Java applications.
c -- This profile will install everything you need to start developing C/C++ applications.
everything -- This profile will install all the Eclipse plug-ins currently available in the module, including those that are a part of the above two profiles.

Read more

Updates from the Document Liberation Project

Filed under
LibO

We mostly focus on LibreOffice on this blog, but The Document Foundation also oversees the Document Liberation Project (DLP), which develops software libraries to import and export many different file formats. If you have some old documents or spreadsheets from legacy office software, for instance, the DLP can help you to access that data – giving control back to you.

Many well-known free and open source programs use DLP libraries, such as Inkscape, Scribus, Calligra and of course LibreOffice. A few days ago, there were some DLP updates, so here’s a quick summary:

Read more

Also: UI Logger

Mozilla Firefox in Kazakhstan

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla takes action to protect users in Kazakhstan

    Today, Mozilla and Google took action to protect the online security and privacy of individuals in Kazakhstan. Together the companies deployed technical solutions within Firefox and Chrome to block the Kazakhstan government’s ability to intercept internet traffic within the country.

    The response comes after credible reports that internet service providers in Kazakhstan have required people in the country to download and install a government-issued certificate on all devices and in every browser in order to access the internet. This certificate is not trusted by either of the companies, and once installed, allowed the government to decrypt and read anything a user types or posts, including intercepting their account information and passwords. This targeted people visiting popular sites Facebook, Twitter and Google, among others.

    “People around the world trust Firefox to protect them as they navigate the internet, especially when it comes to keeping them safe from attacks like this that undermine their security. We don’t take actions like this lightly, but protecting our users and the integrity of the web is the reason Firefox exists.” — Marshall Erwin, Senior Director of Trust and Security, Mozilla

  • Protecting our Users in Kazakhstan

    In July, a Firefox user informed Mozilla of a security issue impacting Firefox users in Kazakhstan: They stated that Internet Service Providers (ISPs) in Kazakhstan had begun telling their customers that they must install a government-issued root certificate on their devices. What the ISPs didn’t tell their customers was that the certificate was being used to intercept network communications. Other users and researchers confirmed these claims, and listed 3 dozen popular social media and communications sites that were affected.

    The security and privacy of HTTPS encrypted communications in Firefox and other browsers relies on trusted Certificate Authorities (CAs) to issue website certificates only to someone that controls the domain name or website. For example, you and I can’t obtain a trusted certificate for www.facebook.com because Mozilla has strict policies for all CAs trusted by Firefox which only allow an authorized person to get a certificate for that domain. However, when a user in Kazakhstan installs the root certificate provided by their ISP, they are choosing to trust a CA that doesn’t have to follow any rules and can issue a certificate for any website to anyone. This enables the interception and decryption of network communications between Firefox and the website, sometimes referred to as a Monster-in-the-Middle (MITM) attack.

    We believe this act undermines the security of our users and the web, and it directly contradicts Principle 4 of the Mozilla Manifesto that states, “Individuals’ security and privacy on the internet are fundamental and must not be treated as optional.”

Xfce 4.14 released! (Yeah, like a week ago ;))

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Why is the release manager late to the party with his blog post? The explanation is simple: We prioritized sticking to the schedule and getting our releases out to everyone as planned, as our codebase was ready. What was not (entirely) ready was some parts of the website, which were brought up-to-date over the course of last week.

So I’m pleased to give you the official Xfce 4.14 tour, which nicely summarizes many of the nice user-facing changes that we pushed into the release (despite it being planned as feature-less, porting-only).

Read more

Also: Xfce 4.16 Should Be Out Next Year But Without GTK4 Or Wayland

Games: ct.js, Sin Slayers, Path of Titans, Steam and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • 2D game editor ct.js goes open source and it's closing in on a new major release

    With an aim to make 2D game development learning fun, ct.js recently went open source to allow anyone to jump in and try it as well as help push it further.

    It's going through a major revamp too, with the first few preview builds available. Since we're covering it, of course this means the editor has Linux support too! As the name of the game engine might suggest, games in ct.js are written in JavaScript.

  • A look over Steam's top releases from July, plus some usual quick thoughts on Linux support

    Valve continue their blog posts highlighting games doing well on the platform, with a look at their top releases on Steam during July now available. Just look with June and May, here's my own little run-down on it.

    As usual, Valve are looking at revenue earned during the first two weeks following the release of a game.

  • Dark fantasy RPG Sin Slayers is getting ready to release soon with Linux support

    Sin Slayers, an RPG with roguelike elements set in a dark fantasy world is getting ready to release with Linux support on September 5th.

  • Dino survival game Path of Titans has been fully funded ready to support Linux

    Path of Titans from Alderon Games has managed to pass the crowdfunding test, with their dino survival game hitting well over their initial goal.

    They had a flexible goal, meaning all funds raised would be sent to them even if the final target wasn't met. Not that it was needed, as they managed to raise $63,920 against the original $24,437 goal.

  • In SKUL, you're a special skeleton that switches heads to gain powers

    SouthPAWGames recently released a demo of their upcoming action-platformer SKUL, it's rather impressive with a pretty unusual cast of characters.

    You play as Skul, a skeleton guard with the power to switch heads with another and gain their power. From what the developer said, eventually you will regain some memories of your past life and eventually face your original death and find out the truth.

  • Rise of Industry is getting a futuristic expansion with 2130 releasing this year

    Dapper Penguin Studios recently announced Rise of Industry: 2130, a futuristic expansion to their sweet strategic tycoon game.

    2130 seems to be taking Rise of Industry in an interesting direction, as it follows players overpulluting the world, creating a nuclear winter killing almost all life on the planet. Since they're not being constrained by history with the original set in 1930, they said for the expansion they're going "crazy with technobabble and future-tech".

  • Steam Play arrived on Linux one year ago, some thoughts

    Tomorrow marks a special occasion, as Steam Play celebrates its first birthday! A good time to reflect on how it’s impacted Linux gaming.

    Steam Play is a feature of the Steam client on Linux that enables you to play Windows games just like you would with any other Linux game. It’s a feature that was long requested by users, with multiple tickets being opened on Valve’s steam-for-linux bug tracker, like this one, all the way back in 2012.

    Announced officially on this day back in 2018, Valve shook the very core of Linux gaming and they’ve certainly made things interesting. What they came up in partnership with the team at CodeWeavers is called Proton—the name given to the software behind Steam Play. It takes Wine with some extra patches and bundles it together with other projects like DXVK. Proton is open source too, available to see on GitHub.

    Linux users have used Wine for many years to run all sorts of games and applications from Windows on Linux. An issue with Wine usage is that developers see you as another Windows user in their statistics. Steam Play does help to solve that issue, as your purchases do count and show up as a Linux sale on Steam.

  • The Iron Oath looks like a great turn-based tactical RPG coming to Linux next year

    After a successful crowdfunding campaign back in 2017, The Iron Oath is progressing well onto a release scheduled for next year.

    This is one covered here on GOL back in August of 2017 when the Kickstarter was running. We never did check back on how The Iron Oath did, so it's pleasing to see Curious Panda Games slashed through the $45,000 goal ending with $94,524! Did you miss it?

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More in Tux Machines

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story ut2004 Update Out srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:00am
Story Coolest Homepage Yet! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:00am
Story IBM Sets Its Sights on Linux Software srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:59am
Story Review of PCLOS srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:24am
Story The Myth of Linux Security srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:39am
Story M$ Plans more Secure Browser :roll: srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:38am
Story Whoops: KDE fliccd Buffer Overflow Vulnerabilities srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:30am
Story Study Find Open Source More Secure srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:36am
Story Interview with Bill Gates srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:36am
Story Security Showdown: Back & Forth srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:35am