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Sunday, 16 Feb 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story ut2004 Update Out srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:00am
Story Coolest Homepage Yet! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:00am
Story IBM Sets Its Sights on Linux Software srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:59am
Story Review of PCLOS srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:24am
Story The Myth of Linux Security srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:39am
Story M$ Plans more Secure Browser :roll: srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:38am
Story Whoops: KDE fliccd Buffer Overflow Vulnerabilities srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:30am
Story Study Find Open Source More Secure srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:36am
Story Interview with Bill Gates srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:36am
Story Security Showdown: Back & Forth srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:35am

Browsers and Privacy

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Browsers, web sites, and user tracking

    Browser tracking across different sites is certainly a major privacy concern and one that is more acute when the boundaries between sites and browsers blur—or disappear altogether. That seems to be the underlying tension in a "discussion" of an only tangentially related proposal being made by Google to the W3C Technical Architecture Group (TAG). The proposal would change the handling of the User-Agent headers sent by browsers, but the discussion turned to the unrelated X-Client-Data header that Chrome sends to Google-owned sites. The connection is that in both cases some feel that the web-search giant is misusing its position to the detriment of its users and its competitors in the web ecosystem.

  • Data detox: Four things you can do today to protect your computer

    From the abacus to the iPad, computers have been a part of the human experience for longer than we think. So much so that we forget the vast amounts of personal data we share with our devices on a daily basis. On any given day we could be tackling sensitive work emails, planning our next vacation, or just booking some good ole doctor’s appointments. No big deal right? Well, in the wrong hands it can become a huge deal.

    Thankfully, it’s pretty easy to tighten your device security. Read on for four easy things you can do today to protect your personal info along with your devices.

Audiocasts/Shows: Command Line Heroes, BSD Now and Linux Headlines

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Command Line Heroes season 4 episode 2: Mainframes

    The story of a small team of rebel employees at General Electric who built a mainframe that pushed computing from a niche market to the mainstream.

  • Kubernetes on bhyve | BSD Now 337

    Happinesses and stresses of full-time FOSS work, building a FreeBSD fileserver, Kubernetes on FreeBSD bhyve, NetBSD 9 RC1 available, OPNSense 20.1 is here, HardenedBSD’s idealistic future, and more.

  • 2020-02-13 | Linux Headlines

    IBM brings Kubernetes to the mainframe, PeerTube 2.1 is packed with polish, lazy image loading is slowly coming to Firefox, and find out which podcast was awarded Podcast of the Year.

Graphics: Mesa, Nouveau, RADV and Intel Blackhole Render

  • Mesa Developers Discuss LTO'ing + PGO'ing Builds For Greater Performance

    Making use of Link-Time Optimizations (LTO) and Profile Guided Optimizations (PGO) is currently being talked about by Mesa developers for their release builds in potentially squeezing out better performance.

    Dieter Nützel shared that when using LTO and PGO compiler optimizations on Mesa, he's able to get RadeonSI's binary size 40% smaller and 16~20% faster for this OpenGL driver. Link-time optimizations are about as the name implies running optimization passes during the linker phase when able to analyze the to-be-produced binary in full rather than the individual object files in order to allow for more inter-procedural optimizations on the whole program.

  • Open-Source Nouveau Extended To Support The GeForce 16 Series With Hardware Acceleration

    With the big Linux 5.6 kernel on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver side there is finally accelerated support for the GeForce RTX 2000 "Turing" graphics cards (when paired with binary-only microcode). With that initial cut support is no GeForce 16 series Turing support, but that is now on-deck for Linux 5.7.

    While the GeForce 16 series is Turing based and just without the RTX cores, firmware/microcode differences and other subtle changes were needed to the Nouveau kernel driver for enabling its open-source hardware accelerated support.

  • Radeon "sisched" Scheduler Is Made Obsolete By RADV's ACO Back-End

    It's been years since last hearing anything about sisched as the SI machine instruction scheduler that started out for the RadeonSI OpenGL driver and was ultimately supported by the RADV Vulkan driver too.

    Years ago, SISCHED helped offer better open-source AMD Radeon Linux gaming performance but those days are over. The scheduler was made part of the AMDGPU LLVM back-end and that sisched code hasn't seen any new work in ages. Now with Valve's ACO taking off so well since its mainlining in Mesa 19.3 as an alternative to the AMDGPU LLVM back-end, it pretty much nails the coffin on SISCHED.

  • Intel Blackhole Render Support Lands In Mesa 20.1

    Intel Blackhole Render support was finally merged today for the new Intel "Iris" Gallium3D OpenGL driver default, the older i965 driver for pre-Broadwell hardware, and also the Mesa state tracker for Gallium3D drivers.

    Proposed back in 2018 was the Intel blackhole render extension for OpenGL / GLES as an extension to disable all rendering operations emitted to the GPU through OpenGL rendering commands but without affecting OpenGL pipeline operations.

Security: Patches, Hack the Box, and Secure Encrypted Virtualization

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (dovecot, firefox, ksh, and webkit2gtk), Debian (firefox-esr and openjdk-8), Mageia (exiv2, flash-player-plugin, python-waitress, and vim and neovim), openSUSE (pcp and rubygem-rack), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (sudo), and Slackware (libarchive).

  • Hack the Box (HTB) machines walkthrough series — Wall

    HTB is an excellent platform that hosts machines belonging to multiple OSes. It also has some other challenges as well. Individuals have to solve the puzzle (simple enumeration plus pentest) in order to log into the platform and download the VPN pack to connect to the machines hosted on the HTB platform.

  • New Patches: AMD Live Migration Support For VMs With Secure Encrypted Virtualization<

    Beyond the Linux kernel patches presented earlier this week for AMD SEV-ES "Encrypted State" support, another Linux patch series out overnight provides another improvement to Secure Encrypted Virtualization with AMD EPYC server processors.

    The newest open-source SEV work to report on this week is live migration support when making use of AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization. Currently VMs can't be live migrated when making use of this hardware-backed encryption support of virtual machines, but a new patch series enables QEMU/KVM live migration to now work in the presence of SEV.

Fedora Council November 2019 meeting: Councily business

Filed under
Red Hat

The Fedora Council’s primary responsibility is to identify the short-, medium-, and long-term goals of the Fedora community and to organize and enable the project to best achieve them. Our mechanism for handling medium-term goals is the Fedora Objectives process. We spent some time reviewing this process and the associated Objective Lead roles.

Although Objectives were invented to help bring visibility and clarity to big project initiatives, we know there is still a communications gap: most of the community doesn’t know exactly what it means for something to be an Objective, and many people don’t know what the current Objectives even are. Plus, being an Objective Lead is extra work — what’s the benefit? And why are Objective Leads given Council seats rather than just asked to report in periodically?

We asked the Objective leads how they felt about it. Overall, they found it beneficial to have a seat on the Council. It helps make the work of the Objective more visible and lends credibility to resource requests. The act of writing and submitting an Objective proposal made them organize their thoughts, goals, and plans in a way that’s more easily understood by others.

Read more

Also: Peter Czanik: Insider 2020-02: Portability; secure logging; Mac support; RPM;

Rhythmbox 3.4.4 Adds ListenBrainz Plugin, New App Icon

Filed under
Software

A new version of Rhythmbox, Ubuntu’s default music player app, is available.

Rhythmbox 3.4.4 is a small update to this venerable player and was released back in January (but I’ve only just heard about it).

As Rhythmbox is no longer the default GNOME music player (a role now filled by the rather anaemic GNOME Music app) this player hasn’t seen much major development for some time.

But it’s not abandoned, as this update, the fourth bug fix update in the 3.4.x series, shows.

So what’s new?

Read more

OpenShift, Kubernetes and Expensive IBM Hardware

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Hardware
  • Integrating IBM Z and LinuxONE into the Red Hat OpenShift developer ecosystem

    My role at IBM is to make sure that we’re equipping developers with the tools and resources you need, along with the selection and guard rails you prefer, to help you focus your efforts entirely on innovation. Security is key to unlocking the true value of the cloud, and we want that to be one less thing you have to worry about when you’re building high-performance solutions. To that end, this week we announced a major milestone furthering Kubernetes support for Linux on IBM Z and IBM LinuxONE: The Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform for Linux on IBM Z and LinuxONE is now generally available.

  • March 5 webinar: Introducing Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Z

    Organizations aim to innovate faster and deploy applications more efficiently through cloud-native development — and they expect these applications to protect their data, scale smoothly, and be always available. Now you can meet all of these expectations by combining the leading container and Kubernetes application platform with the leading enterprise computing platform: Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Z.

    Join the upcoming webinar on March 5 to discover what happens when cloud native meets enterprise computing. You’ll learn how the agility of OpenShift, the security and scalability of IBM Z, and the containerized software of IBM Cloud Paks enable business innovation through cloud-native applications on mission-critical IT infrastructure.

  • IBM and Red Hat bring OpenShift to IBM Z and LinuxONE

    One of the things we often assume with the Red Hat OpenShift platform, and with Kubernetes in general, is that our users have computing needs that always fit inside a standard cloud node. While this is definitely the case for most cloud-based applications, there are plenty of non-JavaScript-and-Redis style applications out there that still need to move into the cloud. Some enterprise applications were written before the cloud existed, and still others were created before JavaScript, C#, and Python even existed. Older systems written in languages, like PL/I and COBOL, can also benefit from the move to cloud, and from the use of containers, they just need a little extra attention to make the transition. Sometimes, they might need more specifically tailored environments than are available in the commodity-hardware-based clouds.

    Or maybe, those systems need to also run extremely large, mission-critical databases, like IBM DB2. In order to unlock the true potential of a multi-cloud compute environment, that cloud software needs to run on a diverse array of hardware similar to what is already in place in some of the world’s largest enterprises and governments offices. Spreading cloud capabilities into these larger systems enables containers to exist in the same environment as the company’s central database, and to embrace and modernize those older applications that may still run the most the basic aspects of a business’ day-to-day operations.

Games: Ninja Pizza Girl, Serious Sam Collection & Panzer Dragoon, Librem 5 Game Development

Filed under
Gaming
  • Delivering the goods with "Ninja Pizza Girl" on Linux and Steam

    Like me, you probably have a bunch of games in your Steam library that you picked up at some point, but have never played. Such is the case for Ninja Pizza Girl which I probably got through a Humble Bundle, however long ago.

  • Serious Sam Collection & Panzer Dragoon announced for Stadia plus some timed exclusives

    It might still be rough but Google's Stadia game streaming service is starting to pull in more games, with a bunch being announced today that look interesting.

    Firstly and perhaps unsurprisingly, The Serious Sam Collection which will blend Serious Sam 1-3 into a single experience was announced for Stadia. Not surprising since Croteam spent a lot of time getting Vulkan support in with Serious Sam Fusion, plus Alen Ladavac co-founder of Croteam went over to Stadia. No exact date yet for The Serious Sam Collection.

  • Librem 5 Game Development

    Many people learn to code through making games for their computer or phone. One of the things I love most about the Librem 5 is that it’s a full computer in your pocket that isn’t locked-down like Android and iOS. This means you get access to more programming languages, tools, frameworks and engines than they do. In this post I’ll showcase popular free and open source game frameworks and engines running on, or building games for, the Librem 5. I’ll be continuously testing new projects and adding them to the list, so if you have a favorite that’s not here yet let us know and I will get to it.

Python Programming: Designing Big Picture, Test and Code, Copied Talk and Learning to Code On the Go

Filed under
Development
  • Designing Big Picture

    Web design encompasses many different skills and disciplines in the production and maintenance of websites. The different areas of web design include web graphic design; interface design; authoring, including standardised code and proprietary software; user experience design; and search engine optimization. Often many individuals will work in teams covering different aspects of the design process, although some designers will cover them all

  • Test and Code: 100: A/B Testing - Leemay Nassery

    Let's say you have a web application and you want to make some changes to improve it.
    You may want to A/B test it first to make sure you are really improving things.

    But really what is A/B testing?

    That's what we'll find out on this episode with Leemay Nassery.

  • Re-using my presentations

    Yesterday I got an email saying that someone in Turkey had stolen one of my presentations. The email included a YouTube link. The video showed a meetup. The presenter (I’ll call him Samuel) was standing in front of a title slide in my style that said, “Big-O: How Code Slows as Data Grows,” which is the title of my PyCon 2018 talk.

    The video was in Turkish, so I couldn’t tell exactly what Samuel was saying, but I scrolled through the video, and sure enough, it was my entire talk, complete with illustrations by my son Ben.

  • Mobile Apps for Learning to Code On the Go, Even in Space

    In a way, programming is like riding a bicycle. You won’t know how to write code unless you do it for a while. In other words, this skill requires much practice to learn and even more support.

    There are several ways one can get started: buy books, watch videos on YouTube, or go the more traditional route and join classes at an educational institute. However, the most convenient way to start your journey is right here at your fingertips.

    Mobile apps that teach you to code have become increasingly popular. And this is not a surprise: with the whole programming course right here on your smartphone; you can learn to code on the go. Whether you’re stuck in a queue or traffic jam, have 10 minutes before going to bed or go somewhere in a bus — open an app and level up your skills.

    That’s why I’ve compiled a list of coding applications that will help you stay up to date, no matter what level you are and what programming language you decided to learn.

Firefox 73 Is Now Available for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Released earlier this week, on February 11th, the Firefox 73 open-source web browser introduces various enhancement to make your browsing experience more enjoyable. Among these improvements, we can mention the ability to add a custom default zoom level that applies to all web content.

Firefox comes with a 100% zoom level by default, but now it can be changed to whatever suits your needs thanks to a new “Default zoom” dropdown menu implemented in the Zoom section under “Language and Appearance” settings.

Read more

Penguin Tux - An Interesting story behind Linux Mascot

Filed under
Linux

One such old and well-recognized mascot is Tux. Tux is a cutesy, chubby penguin that is sitting down and is an official mascot to Linux Kernel, one of the oldest open source monolithic, Unix-like operating system kernel. The Linux family that is represented by this little waterfowl is based on this kernel and developed on both traditional as well as personal computers and servers, usually in the same format of other Linux distributions on different embedded devices like.

Read more

Solus Gets Linux Kernel 5.5, Deprecates Nvidia 340 Legacy Driver

Filed under
OS
Linux

Solus follows a rolling release model where the user installs the operating system once and receives updates forever. The latest update pack brings the recently released Linux 5.5 kernel series, which introduces full Raspberry Pi 4 support, cross device offloaded copy for NFS clients, Btrfs RAID1 with 3- and 4- copies, and much more. This means better hardware support for your Solus installations.

The ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture) sound system has been updated as well with the latest Solus update pack, greatly improving audio by improved support for devices like Broadwell Audio DSPs, Gigabyte Motherboards with dual HD-audio codecs, Dell WD15 Dock USB-audio, Intel Broxton SoCs, Intel Skylake I2S, and Lenovo Ideapad Miix 320.

Read more

Persistent L2ARC might be coming to ZFS on Linux

Filed under
Linux

Enlarge / Intel's Optane persistent memory is widely considered the best choice for ZFS write buffer devices. But L2ARC is more forgiving than SLOG, and larger, slower devices like standard consumer M.2 SSDs should work well for it, too.

Today, a request for code review came across the ZFS developers' mailing list. Developer George Amanakis has ported and revised code improvement that makes the L2ARC—OpenZFS's read cache device feature—persistent across reboots. Amanakis explains...

Read more

Flatpak 1.6.2 Arrives to Fix Major Install Performance Issue

Filed under
Red Hat
Software

Flatpak maintainer Alexander Larsson released today Flatpak 1.6.2, the second maintenance update to the Flatpak 1.6 stable series that addresses some performance issues and other bugs.

The main change in Flatpak 1.6.2 is a fix for a major regression affecting the download speeds during the installation of Flatpak apps from Fluthub. Therefore, the devs recommend everyone to update to this version for a better and faster Flatpak app installation experience.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • LibreOffice QA/Dev Report: January 2020

    LibreOffice 6.4 was released on January 29 containing many performance and interoperability improvements

  • Microsoft will no longer force Bing by default for Office 365 ProPlus customers

    Microsoft will no longer forcibly make Bing the default search engine in Chrome for Office 365 ProPlus customers. A techcommunity post from Microsoft announced the change. Microsoft states that people will have the choice to opt-in to have the Microsoft Search in Bing browser extension installed.

    Microsoft was going to install the Microsoft Search Bing extension onto any system with Office 365 ProPlus that didn't already have Bing set as the default search engine. This would have effectively forced Bing onto Office 365 ProPlus customers. The move set off waves of backlash around the web, which caused Microsoft to change its plans.

  • Stephen Michael Kellat: Making A Service Launch

    While I know the folks behind the Ubuntu Podcast are planning to return to air shortly I will instead be taking a different path. The current hotness appears to be launching your own newsletter such as this technology one. Since podcasting is not feasible at the moment the reformatting of content to a strictly textual form seem like the simplest way forward for now.

    I could operate an announce-only mailman list on a minimal Ubuntu 19.10 droplet on Digital Ocean. However, my current economic circumstances have instead pushed me over to trying to utilize tinyletter.com instead. To quote the 13th & 21st US Secretary of Defense, Donald Rumsfeld, in an apt manner: “As you know, you go to war with the army you have, not the army you might want or wish to have at a later time.”

  • MontaVista Launches a Linux® Migration Program for Windows® Embedded and Windows® CE Users
  • GetWired Aims to Make RS-485 Wired Home Automation Affordable and User-friendly (Crowdfunding)
  • Attend our Cambridge Computing Education Research Symposium

    Are you an academic, researcher, student, or educator who is interested in computing education research? Then come and join us in Cambridge, UK on 1 April 2020 for discussion and networking at our first-ever research symposium.

Brave Browser on Chromebook, Firefox 73 on POWER and Privacy/VPN Leftovers

Filed under
Web
  • Can I install the Brave Browser on my Chromebook?

    If you’re using a Chromebook, chances are high that you’re perfectly comfortable using the Chrome browser as your default portal to the internet. However, as the Chrome OS ecosystem continues to expand, more and more users are moving to the platform and some of them may want other options. Because of the nature of Chrome OS, you’re out of luck if you want to install a secondary browser directly onto the main operating system. Thankfully, there are curious people out there that like to ask me questions that lead me to figure out new and inventive ways to do cool stuff on Chrome OS.

    [...]

    Built to block ads and trackers, Brave boasts that their browser can attain speeds twice that of Chrome. Where Brave differs from many other ad-blocking platforms is that it was designed to create an alternative traditional to advertising platforms by offering publishers and users a way to be part of a privacy-respecting revenue sharing program. When you browse the site of a verified Brave Publisher, they benefit by receiving BAT (Basic Attention Tokens). Users are also rewarded with BAT when they allow a limited number of ads to display on sites they browse. I’ll save you the long, drawn-out argument about the pros and cons of this type of advertising model. If you want to learn more about Brave and the Basic Attention Token at the foundation of its revenue, you can do so here.

  • The Talospace Project: Firefox 73 on POWER

    ...seems to just work. New in this release is better dev tools and additional CSS features. This release includes the fix for certain extensions that regressed in Fx71, and so far seems to be working fine on this Talos II. The debug and optimized mozconfigs I'm using are, as before, unchanged from Firefox 67.

  • Security Still the Top Concern as Privacy Regs Loom

    Enforcement of CCPA doesn’t begin until July, which gives some time for American companies who do business with Californians to come into compliance. But other states are expected to follow in California’s footsteps and craft data privacy regulations that are similar to CCPA (which itself is similar to GDPR).

    HelpSystems is also tracking how those new data privacy requirements translate into new requirements for IBM i tools and technology. “We’ve also seen a lot of request for data encryption at rest, and data encryption for data that’s in flight,” Huntington says.

    Ian Jarman, the former IBM i product offering manager who now heads up IBM Lab Services, is keeping an eye on the evolving compliance landscape, in particular the “dramatic rise” in the number of the regulations.

    “The thing that is beginning to change is consumer privacy,” Jarman says. “The GPDR, the [data protection] regulations in Europe, these are being replicated, or similar types of regulations are coming in Latin America, in California, and I think you will continue to see that rise.”

  • OpenVPN vs WireGuard: The Best VPN Protocol

    Before I begin, I want to give a brief overview of the development history and business model of both the VPN protocols. As most of us know, OpenVPN is among the oldest VPN protocols which was first released in 2001. It’s an open-source VPN protocol and run by the OpenVPN project. Having said that, OpenVPN is not free to use either for personal or commercial users so keep that in mind. Nevertheless, you can use the OpenVPN Community Edition for free, but with very limited features.

Openwashing Galore: Waste, Linux Foundation and 'Open' Surveillance

Filed under
Misc
  • This Open-Source ‘Precious Plastic’ Project Is Changing What Waste Means And How Recycling Is Done

    People involved in more than 400 projects around the world are using a recycling system that they downloaded for free from the internet. It’s from an open-source project called Precious Plastic, based in the Netherlands. The basic idea: Plastic can be a resource if you have the tools to turn it into beautiful new things.

    “Plastic is a precious and valuable material. It’s just been kind of designed, used and marketed in the wrong way, in our view,” says Joseph Klatt, business guy with Precious Plastic.

    That’s Klatt’s official title: business guy. He’s based in the Netherlands, but is originally from Ohio.

  • Cloud Foundry Foundation Turns 5

    The Cloud Foundry Foundation, home to open source projects helping build the future of cloud applications, is celebrating its 5th anniversary.

    Officially launched in January 2015 with more than 40 members as an independent not-for-profit Linux Foundation Collaborative Project, the Foundation projects include Cloud Foundry Application Runtime, Cloud Foundry Container Runtime, BOSH, Open Service Broker API, Eirini, Project Quarks, Abacus, CF-Local, CredHub, ServiceFabrik, Stratos, and more.

    The Cloud Foundry project comprises of Cloud Foundry Elastic Runtime (now Cloud Foundry Application Runtime) and BOSH.

  • Facebook Releases Open-Source Library For 3D Deep Learning: PyTorch3D

    In a significant boost to 3D deep learning research, Facebook AI has released PyTorch3D, a highly modular and optimised library with unique capabilities to make 3D deep learning easier with PyTorch.

    PyTorch3d provides efficient, reusable components for 3D Computer Vision research with PyTorch.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Academic Writing Tools on GNU/Linux - Free Software Only

This is my list of GNU/Linux tools for academic, educational, and research purposes which all are free software. I tried to pick up choices as simple as possible here just to represent every basic category and further I hope you could see more alternatives if you want. I also listed several specific tools like GNU Octave and Parallel which are proven to be useful for certain researches. On the other hand, I deliberately did not list LaTeX tools here as I already chosen LibreOffice for that category. I made every proprietary software name italicized here so you can spot them on easier. Happy researching! Read more

Open Source Audio-Video: 8 Replacements for Expensive Applications

Open source audio-video software offers an alternative to paying for expensive proprietary software. And in many cases, the open source options are as good as or better than the comparable commercial, proprietary solutions. In fact, users site the top reasons why they use open source software as: the features, freedom from vendor lock-in and the quality of the solutions. Price and total cost of ownership weren't even on the list. In other words, people are using open source because the software is so good, and the fact that it is free is just a side benefit. The list of audio-video software below includes a variety of open source software for home users and SMBs. All of these applications can replace commercial products that can carry high prices. Even if buyers choose to purchase support or other services for their open source software, the open source options are generally much more affordable than the comparable proprietary solutions. Read more Also: Record screencast or web cam video with VokoscreenNG an open source program for Windows and Linux

Games: Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac, Iris and the Giant, The Farlanders and Westmark Manor

  • Comedy cosmic horror adventure 'Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac' releasing on February 26

    Mixing comedy with cosmic horror might seem a little weird and it is, Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac is releasing with Linux support on February 26. The first game from French studio La Poule Noire, Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac has you play as the eccentric outcast Edgar whose best friend is a Chicken. Unfortunately, a sudden disaster forces you out of your shack and towards the bright lights of the big city, Boulzac, where an 800 year old fire rages beneath the surface, and weird things are afoot.

  • Fusing a deck-builder and a narrative adventure 'Iris and the Giant' releases February 27 - demo up

    Developer Louis Rigaud and publisher Goblinz Studio have announced their fusion of a deck-builder with a narrative adventure and turn-based battles, Iris and the Giant, is going to release on February 27. They say it mixes together "a collectible card game with RPG and roguelike elements", with you playing a Iris who must brave her fears in her imaginary world. Behind the game's unique minimalist art style players will explore a touching story of a young woman facing her inner demons and soothing the raging giant inside.

  • Martian city-builder 'The Farlanders' has a big new release up with a Happiness system

    Sweet small city-builder The Farlanders is evolving into a bigger game, with a new release now up introducing some fresh game mechanics. A game covered here briefly last year, as a promising up-and-coming city-builder that was aiming to do things a little bit differently and that feeling continues with this new build. Version 0.3.0 introduces a Happiness system, there's new types of terrain and terraforming options, new building types and the game has gone through an overhaul on the balance.

  • Explore a dark mansion in the survival horror 'Westmark Manor' releasing this year

    Sometime later this Summer, Westmark Manor will take you on a journey into the occult and the developer Nodbrim Interactive is planning to get it on Linux too. It's a mixture of gameplay elements here with exploration, puzzle solving and survival and it sounds like plenty of inventory management too as you acquire the tools needed to progress through different rooms in a mansion. Two days ago they put up a reveal trailer and while a bit dark (visually), it gives an interesting look into the horrifying things you will get up to in Westmark Manor.