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Wednesday, 08 Apr 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Truths srlinuxx 23/06/2011 - 6:30pm
Blog entry Zentyal Linux, a usable Linux Server fieldyweb 28/10/2011 - 10:32pm
Blog entry 6 Linux as a Service Distros you should know about.. fieldyweb 26/10/2011 - 10:18pm
Blog entry Konqueror in KDE4. It's not so terrible, I guess. blackbelt_jones 1 25/10/2011 - 12:10am
Blog entry Sabayon 7 GNOME 3 review finid 20/10/2011 - 2:33am
Blog entry My plan to use KDE3 forever. blackbelt_jones 18/10/2011 - 9:19pm
Blog entry OpenIndiana Desktop 151 review finid 15/10/2011 - 4:17pm
Blog entry ChromeOS in VirtualBox Texstar 09/08/2011 - 7:56am
Blog entry Fred srlinuxx 5 22/07/2011 - 3:51pm
Blog entry CentOS 6.0 finid 11/07/2011 - 10:41am

Biogenesis - Play evolution

Filed under
Software
Reviews
Sci/Tech

Molecular biology is a fascinating thing. Combine it with computers, and you get yourself a platform for studying the evolution of life. Not an easy one, and scientists worldwide have been at this problem for many years now, trying to understand and replicate the environmental conditions that led to the creation of life on Earth.

If you're fascinated by the concepts of amino acids, RNA, cellular division and alike, you can partake in the discovery journey with Biogenesis, a free, cross-platform, Java-based visual microbiology simulator. The idea is simple: you get a primordial soup, and you get to control it, studying and creating organisms of your own. Sounds like good, solid educational fun. Let there be light. I mean Java.

[...]

Biogenesis is not your everyday program, and it will most likely appeal to a tiny, tiny niche of users with some scientific inclination. However, it's a very capable and fascinating educational tool, as it touches on many important aspects of life without forcing you to go through four years of university somewhere, not that you shouldn't. It's smartly designed, it has the right dose of simple and complex, and it entices the brain to think in just the right way.

The one thing I'm missing are the actual algorithms in the background, which determine how applicable Biogenesis is for real-life simulations. Then again, it allows us to contemplate hypothetical early-life scenarios, and maybe gain understanding into why certain organisms are more prevalent, and how they have come to dominate life. Anyway, definitely worth testing. Begin.

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How to Install Latest Java 14 in Ubuntu 18.04, 20.04, Linux Mint

Filed under
HowTos

Oracle Java 14 is released. And here's how you can download and install in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, 19.10 and Linux Mint 18.x, 19.x.
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IBM/Red Hat Leveraging COVID-19 for Marketing

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Automation against the COVID-19 crisis: 4 suggestions to get started

    Without public cloud computing, we wouldn't be able to face the pandemic in the way we are. On-premise data centers have never scaled this fast, and not even the most rigorous capacity planning in the world would have forecasted the resource consumption we face today. News outlets covering the outbreaks would have not been able to cope with an entire planet constantly refreshing the home page in the hope of reading good news (that’s what I do). Hospitals and research facilities publishing dashboards full of virus spread statistics would not have been able to acquire the massive datasets they have as fast as they did. Videoconferencing and streaming platforms wouldn’t be able to serve, exceptionally so far, the enormous amount of the human workforce suddenly forced to work from home.

    And what is public cloud computing in the end? An astonishing, unprecedented, disciplined, methodical, pervasive amount of automation (and a few other, equally critical things).

    Automation doesn’t just allow us to cope with the urgency and scale of the demand in the public cloud and inside our data centers. Automation is helping organizations around the world to transition to a work-from-home productivity model. Without automation, the security teams would be hard pressed to install VPN clients across millions of laptops, tablets and smartphones all around the world.

  • UNESCO CodeTheCurve global virtual hackathon: Build your skills and help make a difference

    At least 1.5 billion young people are currently at home due to school closures relating to the global COVID-19 pandemic. One hundred eighty-three countries have been disrupted. Students, parents, and communities continue to cope with social isolation, while exploring how to maintain a sense of normalcy with the sea of online learning content, collaboration tools, and social media platforms available for the world to consume. Conversations that once took place face-to-face have now moved virtual.

    For students, parents, teachers, educators, and others, home confinement has brought the additional attention and need for an innovative learning paradigm, one centered on practical and real-world digital skills. This is a time that’s especially challenging for the 49% of the global population who lack access to broadband internet. For those who are online, the spread of misinformation and disinformation relating to COVID-19 complicates the situation even further by diminishing confidence in public health guidance by authorities, and has given rise to panic and uncertainty.

i.MX8M Mini Pico-ITX board has a DSP for voice control plus optional AI

Estone’s “EMB-2237-AI” Pico-ITX SBC integrates a “SOM-2237” module that runs Linux on an i.MX8M Mini and adds a DSP for audio. The carrier adds LAN with PoE, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, mics and speakers, and an M.2 slot with Edge TPU AI support.

Estone Technology’s EMB-2237-AI is the first SBC we’ve seen to combine the 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX form-factor with an NXP i.MX8M Mini SoC. Other Mini-based SBCs include Seco’s SBC-C61, Boardcon’s sandwich-style EM-IMX8M-MINI, and Garz & Fricke’s recent Tanaro, among others.

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Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Python 2.7.18rc1

    Python 2.7.18 release candidate 1 is a testing release for Python 2.7.18, the last release of Python 2.

  • Python 2.7.18 release candidate 1 available

    A first release candidate for Python 2.7.18 is now available for download. Python 2.7.18 will be the last release of the Python 2.7 series, and thus Python 2.

  • Python Software Foundation: Python Software Foundation Fellow Members for Q1 2020

    Congratulations! Thank you for your continued contributions. We have added you to our Fellow roster online.

    The above members have contributed to the Python ecosystem by teaching Python, creating education material, contributing to circuitpython, contributing to and maintaining packaging, organizing Python events and conferences, starting Python communities in their home countries, and overall being great mentors in our community. Each of them continues to help make Python more accessible around the world. To learn more about the new Fellow members, check out their links above.

    Let's continue to recognize Pythonistas all over the world for their impact on our community. The criteria for Fellow members is available online: https://www.python.org/psf/fellows/. If you would like to nominate someone to be a PSF Fellow, please send a description of their Python accomplishments and their email address to psf-fellow at python.org. We are accepting nominations for quarter 2 through May 20, 2020.

  • How to Make an Instagram Bot With Python and InstaPy

    What do SocialCaptain, Kicksta, Instavast, and many other companies have in common? They all help you reach a greater audience, gain more followers, and get more likes on Instagram while you hardly lift a finger. They do it all through automation, and people pay them a good deal of money for it. But you can do the same thing—for free—using InstaPy!

    In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to build a bot with Python and InstaPy, which automates your Instagram activities so that you gain more followers and likes with minimal manual input. Along the way, you’ll learn about browser automation with Selenium and the Page Object Pattern, which together serve as the basis for InstaPy.

  • Sending Encrypted Messages from JavaScript to Python via Blockchain

    Last year, I worked with the Capacity team on the Crypto stamp project, the first physical postage stamp with a unique digital twin, issued by the Austrian Postal Service (Österreichische Post AG). Those stamps are mainly intended as collectibles, but their physical "half" can be used as valid postage on packages or letters, and a QR code on that physical stamp links to a website presenting the digital collectible. Our job (at Capacity Blockchain Solutions) was to build that digital collectible, the website at crypto.post.at, and the back-end service delivering both public meta data and the back end for the website. I specifically did most of the work on the Ethereum Smart Contract for the digital collectible, a "non-fungible token" (NFT) using the ERC-721 standard (publicly visible), as well as the back-end REST service, which I implemented in Python (based on Flask and Web3.py). The coding for the website was done by colleagues, of course using JavaScript for the dynamic elements.

  • Unpacking in Python: Beyond Parallel Assignment

    Unpacking in Python refers to an operation that consists of assigning an iterable of values to a tuple (or list) of variables in a single assignment statement. As a complement, the term packing can be used when we collect several values in a single variable using the iterable unpacking operator, *.

    Historically, Python developers have generically referred to this kind of operation as tuple unpacking. However, since this Python feature has turned out to be quite useful and popular, it's been generalized to all kinds of iterables. Nowadays, a more modern and accurate term would be iterable unpacking.

    In this tutorial, we'll learn what iterable unpacking is and how we can take advantage of this Python feature to make our code more readable, maintainable, and pythonic.

    Additionally, we'll also cover some practical examples of how to use the iterable unpacking feature in the context of assignments operations, for loops, function definitions, and function calls.

  • Spin the table: Solution!

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (firefox-esr, gnutls28, and libmtp), Fedora (cyrus-sasl, firefox, glibc, squid, and telnet), Gentoo (firefox), Mageia (dcraw, firefox, kernel, kernel-linus, librsvg, and python-nltk), openSUSE (firefox, haproxy, icu, and spamassassin), Red Hat (nodejs:10, openstack-manila, python-django, python-XStatic-jQuery, and telnet), Slackware (firefox), SUSE (bluez, exiv2, and libxslt), and Ubuntu (firefox).

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 191 - Security scanners are all terrible

    Josh and Kurt talk about security scanners. They're all pretty bad today, but there are some things we can do to make them better. Step one is to understand the problem. Do you know why you're running the scanner and what the reports mean?

  • Misconfigured Docker API Ports Targeted by Kinsing Malware

    Security researchers observed an attack campaign that targeted misconfigured Docker API ports with samples of Kinsing malware.

    According to Aqua Security, the campaign began when it capitalized on an unprotected Docker API port to run a Ubuntu container.

    The command used for creating the Ubuntu container included a shell script “d.sh.” By means of its 600+ lines of code, the shell script began by disabling security measures, clearing logs and disabling other malware and cryptominer samples. It’s then that the command killed rival malicious Docker containers before loading its Kinsing payload.

  • L1d Cache Flush On Context Switch Moves Forward For Linux In Light Of Vulnerabilities

    A new patch series sent out just under one month ago was providing opt-in L1 data cache flushing on context switching. That work has now been revived again and now with documentation added it's clear that this work is being done in response to a recent CVE being made public.

    The patches originally sent out by an Amazon engineer characterized the work as for the "paranoid due to the recent snoop assisted data sampling vulnerabilities, to flush their L1D on being switched out. This protects their data from being snooped or leaked via side channels after the task has context switched out."

Galaxy Chromebook reviews

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Reviews

I can't imagine using something this fancy without wiping out the toy OS and installing Ubuntu Linux instead.

One thing that struck me is that The Verge's full-column warning (partially embedded below) about the clickwrap contracts the user must agree to just to start the machine. These are commonplace with gadgets, but rarely in such great numbers or with such hostile presentation. The reviewer writes they were unable to read them.

Tech companies have turned Linux into a transmission vector for adhesion contracts that are virtually impossible to read. To think, they used to complain that the GPL was a virus!

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Initial Benchmarks With Intel oneAPI Level Zero Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week Intel released an initial set of micro-benchmarks for their oneAPI Level Zero and with L0 support being plumbed into their open-source Intel Compute Runtime, this weekend I started toying around with some Level Zero benchmarks on a variety of Intel processors.

The oneAPI Level Zero API is their direct-to-metal interfaces for accelerators from GPUs to other hardware. This testing in conjunction with the latest Intel Compute Runtime was testing their Gen9 and Gen11 graphics aboard various Intel CPUs.
The Intel level-zero-tests micro-benchmarks aren't the first time we are benchmarking oneAPI components but have been doing so for months. Via the Phoronix Test Suite and OpenBenchmarking.org and commonly within our hardware reviews are benchmarks on other oneAPI tools like Intel Embree, Open Image Denoise OSPray, OpenSWR, and others. Intel oneAPI continues to have us quite excited on the software front and closely are monitoring its open-source advancements through 2020.

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The 20 Best Speech to Text and Text to Speech Apps for Android

Filed under
Android

Often we need to take quick notes and don’t get enough time to type on our phone. If we can use our voice command to detect the speech and type it down, then things get easier. In such a case, a speech to text app for Android can work better. At the same time, we often don’t have enough interest or energy to read out a text, whether long or short. For that, we can use a text to speech app for our Android device. These 2 types of apps work in a similar way, but their functions are completely different from one another as we see.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Ray Tracing Gets Its First Open-Source, Cross-Platform Implementation

    Khronos, the consortium responsible for many open standards in the gaming/graphics world, has released a beta ray tracing API, making it the first cross-platform implementation of real-time ray tracing. NVIDIA also released new beta drivers that support it.

    If you don’t know what I’m talking about; ray tracing is a CGI technique that is used to create photorealistic images.

    It renders objects by simulating the way actual rays of lights work in the real world and “tracing” them from the eye of the viewer, hence the name.

    Practically speaking, it gives us better shadows, reflections, translucence, refraction and a myriad of other improvements over the techniques that our consoles are currently deploying.

  • Glue42 releases open source platform

    Glue42, the company that delivers integrated desktop experiences to financial institutions globally, today announced it has released Glue42 Core, an open-source, fully functional platform for web application interoperability.

    The solution is available immediately to all in the financial services industry and those in other sectors.

  • 01 Communique Invites Email Users to Try IronCAP X Personal Usage Email Platform After April 23rd Launch

    01 Communique Laboratory Inc. (the "Company", "01 Communique") (ONE.V) invites all email users to try out their new IronCAP X personal usage email encryption product as it will be free to personal users after the April 23rd product launch. The Company's IronCAP X email encryption technology is designed to be safe against future attack from quantum computer. Therefore, it has a higher protection level than current GPG, or GNU Privacy Guard public key cryptography implementation platforms, and at the same time, easier for non-technical users.

    [...]

    Andrew Cheung, President of 01 Communique stated, "The IT community likes the current GPG email/file encryption package as it works well but there is always a catch. Most non-technical users cannot appreciate what it can do and how to install it. IronCAP X technology has addressed all of that as it wraps friendly packing around GPG." Mr. Cheung continued, "On April 23rd, we are launching IronCAP X which is easy to install and use, and protects against the quantum computing threat. Best of all, it will be free for personal users."

  • Richard Stallman: Don’t watch TV coverage of Covid-19!

    Don't watch TV coverage of Covid-19! (Or "social media"; the details are different.) Watching repetitive coverage of something frightening can interfere with clear thinking, even traumatize people.

    TV news coverage of a crisis struggles to fill 24 hours a day with "information", notwithstanding the fact that the actual flow of new information about the crisis is nowhere near sufficient to fill that time. What do they do? They repeat. They present tangential and minor details. They make the same points in different ways. They belabor the obvious. They repeat.

    If your goal is to be informed, you don't need to dwell on the crisis for hours every day. Not even one hour a day. Getting your news in this inefficient matter will waste a lot of time — and worse.

    In addition, it will make you more and more anxious. Someone I knew in 2001, who lived in California. spent all day on Sep 11 and following days watching the TV coverage. Afterward perse was afraid to go outside, watching for terrorist airplanes. TV made it possible for per to be traumatized by events 3000 miles away.

    That was an unusually strong case. Most people did not get so traumatized as that. That does not imply it did not affect them. I suspect that the TV coverage may have shifted millions of people's perceptions, so that they overestimated the danger of terrorism while downplaying the danger of laws that take away freedom. This would have smoothed the path for careless passage of the dangerous USA PAT RIOT Act and its massive surveillance.

    In any a good, general textual news site, you can read the things you really want to know about Covid-19 in 10 or 20 minutes a day. Then you won't fall behind on your work, and you won't be brainwashed into panic.

    Keep calm and carry on!

  • Microsoft Team's bad arrogance on (Fedora) Linux

    As you might suspect, this isn't the only thing that the postinstall script does. It also adds an enabled Microsoft package repository to your system (requiring signatures, at least, which is why they have to add their key). It's not documented that they'll do this, they certainly don't ask, all of this is done on the fly so the relevant yum.repos.d file isn't in the RPM's manifest, and I don't believe they restrict what packages can be installed from their repository (although from its URL it appears to be specific to Teams).

    (Another fun thing that the RPM does is that it puts the actual Teams binary and its shared library .so files in /usr/share/teams. I do not know how to break it to Microsoft, but that is not what goes in /usr/share. Also, it is of course an Electron app.)

  • Oracle teases prospect of playing nicely with open-source Java in update to WebLogic application server

    Oracle has chosen this week of all weeks to foist on the world an update of its application server WebLogic, festooned with new features addressing Java EE 8, Kubernetes and JSON.

    But the most eye-catching prospect is compatibility with the Eclipse Foundation's fully open-source Java development environment, Jakarta EE 8.

    Back in Sepember when the Java EE specs were made public, Mark Little, Red Hat's JBoss CTO, said: "Existing Java EE 8 applications and developers can be confident they can move their applications seamlessly to the Eclipse Foundation effort." And Tom Snyder, veep of Oracle Software Development, promised application server support would follow. "This represents the culmination of a great deal of work by the entire Jakarta EE community, including Oracle. Oracle is working on delivery of a Java EE 8 and Jakarta EE 8 compatible WebLogic Server implementation, and we are looking forward to working with the community to evolve Jakarta EE for the future."

  • Jakub Steiner: Art vs Design

    So what was the situation twitter was praising? Let’s count on how many GNOME applications shipped a custom nighly icon. Umm, how about zero?

    A pretty picture an artist spends hours on, modelling, texturing, lighting, adjusting for low resolution screens is not a visual framework nor a reasonable thing to ask app developers to do.

SFP modules on a board running Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

We had to overcome a few challenges to get this setup working, using a mainline Linux kernel.

As we discussed earlier, having SFP modules meant the whole MAC-PHY-SFP link has to be reconfigured at runtime, as the PHY in the SFP module is hot-pluggable. To solve this issue a framework called Phylink, was introduced in mid-2017 to represent networking links and allowing their component to share states and to be reconfigured at runtime. For us, this meant we had to first convert the CPSW MAC driver to use this phylink framework. For a detailed explanation of what composes Ethernet links and why Phylink is needed, we gave a talk at the Embedded Linux Conference Europe in 2018. While we were working on this and after we first moved the CPSW MAC driver to use Phylink, this driver was rewritten and a new CPSW MAC driver was sent upstream (CONFIG_TI_CPSW vs CONFIG_TI_CPSW_SWITCHDEV). We are still using the old driver for now, and this is why we did not send our patches upstream as we think it does not make sense to convert a driver which is now deprecated.

A second challenge was to integrate the 2-wire capability of the VSC8572 PHY into the networking PHY and SFP common code, as our SFP modules I2C bus is connected to the PHY and not an I2C controller from the system-on-chip. We decided to expose this PHY 2-wire capability as an SMBus controller, as the functionality offered by the PHY does not make it a fully I2C compliant controller.

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What is good documentation for software projects?

Filed under
Development
Google
OSS

The Open Geospatial (OSGeo) Foundation recently participated in Google's first Season of Docs, in which Google sponsored senior technical writers to contribute to open source projects. OSGeo is an umbrella organization for around 50 geospatial open source projects. I've contributed to a number of these projects over the years and recently co-mentored the two Season of Docs technical writers Google allocated to OSGeo.

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LibreOffice: Leif-Jöran Olsson and openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference

Filed under
LibO
  • [LibreOffice] Community Member Monday: Leif-Jöran Olsson

    Members of The Document Foundation – the non-profit entity behind LibreOffice – help to steer the project, vote for the Board of Directors, and spread the word. Today we’re talking to Leif-Jöran Olsson, who has recently become a member of TDF…

  • openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference Still On, Virtual Conference Considered

    The tech world has been hit hard by the coronavirus impact, and large companies like Microsoft, Google, Facebook and so many others have already canceled their events, moving to virtual conferences that completely eliminate the risk of infection for attendees.

    The openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference, scheduled to take place in October, is still on, The Document Foundation said in an announcement today, but the organizers are still keeping an eye on the virus outbreak to adjust their plans in a timely manner.

    TDF says in a blog post that while it doesn’t yet cancel the physical event, it’s already considering alternative solutions, including a virtual conference.

Easy Buster version 2.2.16

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

EasyOS versions 1.x are the "Pyro" series, the latest is 1.3. Easy Pyro is built with packages compiled from source using 'oe-qky-src', a fork of OpenEmbedded. Consequently, the builds are small and streamlined and integrated. The Pyro series may have future releases, but it is considered to be in maintenance status.
The "Buster" series start from version 2.0, and are intended to be where most of the action is, ongoing. Version 2.0 was really a beta-quality build, to allow the testers to report back. The first official release was 2.1.
The main feature of Easy Buster is that it is built from Debian 10 Buster DEBs, using WoofQ (a fork of Woof2: Woof-CE is another fork, used to build Puppy Linux).
The advantage of Buster over Pyro is access to the large Debian package repositories. That is a big plus.
On the other hand, DEB packages have many dependencies, and the end result is a release considerably larger than Pyro with similar app selection. For example, the download file of Pyro 1.2 is 418MB, Buster 2.1 is 504MB -- despite the Buster build having less apps (Pyro has Qt5 and big Qt5-based apps such as Scribus, this is all missing from the Buster build, but can be installed).

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Learn about Rust and how to get started

Filed under
Development

Start by downloading Rust. After downloading the relevant file, follow the instructions on the installation page to continue the installation.

I recommend using the tool "rustup." Once you are done, configure the path variable. All this is detailed on the download link above.

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Latest Security and FUD

Filed under
Security
  • Userdir URLs like https://example.org/~username/ are dangerous

    I would like to point out a security problem with a classic variant of web space hosting. While this issue should be obvious to anyone knowing basic web security, I have never seen it being discussed publicly.

    Some server operators allow every user on the system to have a personal web space where they can place files in a directory (often ~/public_html) and they will appear on the host under a URL with a tilde and their username (e.g. https://example.org/~username/). The Apache web server provides such a function in the mod_userdir module. While this concept is rather old, it is still used by some and is often used by universities and Linux distributions.

    From a web security perspective there is a very obvious problem with such setups that stems from the same origin policy, which is a core principle of Javascript security. While there are many subtleties about it, the key principle is that a piece of Javascript running on one web host is isolated from other web hosts.

    To put this into a practical example: If you read your emails on a web interface on example.com then a script running on example.org should not be able to read your mails, change your password or mess in any other way with the application running on a different host. However if an attacker can place a script on example.com, which is called a Cross Site Scripting or XSS vulnerability, the attacker may be able to do all that.

  • FOSSID and BearingPoint Enter Strategic Partnership Around Open Source Software Governance

    FOSSID, a leader in open source software compliance and security, and BearingPoint, a leader in open source management services, today announced their strategic partnership around free and open source software governance. After successfully cooperating in selected projects for more than two years, BearingPoint decided to choose FOSSID as its strategic provider of open source analysis tools. FOSSID’s technology provides high performance and accuracy in the code analysis services performed by BearingPoint.

    [...]

    BearingPoint’s modular FOSS services provide companies with streamlined processes and infrastructure to deploy, manage, and govern their software throughout the product lifecycle, helping them to manage open source compliance and security. BearingPoint’s FOSS analysis services provide a timely and confidential analysis of the customers’ code base, including comprehensive compliance and security reports for their business decisions.

  • 5 ways to secure your applications from open-source vulnerabilities [Ed: Interesting, Proprietary software programs/code have no vulnerabilities? This is only an Open Source thing?]
  • How to make open source success less of a crapshoot [Ed: Typical Asay]

Devices/Embedded With GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Open source near ubiquitous in IoT, report finds

    Open provide is an growing variety of regular working course of in software, nonetheless nowhere is that this more true than Net of Points building. In keeping with a model new VisionMobile survey of three,700 IoT builders, 91% of respondents use open provide software in a minimal of 1 area in their software stack. This is good news for IoT because of best open provide ensures to chop again or put off the potential of lock-in imposed by way of proprietary “necessities.”

    What’s in all chance most attention-grabbing on this affection for open provide, then again, is that concurrently endeavor builders have eschewed the politics of open provide licensing, IoT builders seem to need open provide because of “it’s free as in freedom.”

  • MIOTY Silicon Vendor Agnostic, Scalable LPWAN Standard to Take on LoRaWAN, NB-IoT

    There are plenty of LPWAN (Low Power Wide Area Networks) standards designed for low power, low bitrate and long-range connectivity with the most popular currently being NB-IoT and LoRaWAN. But Texas Instruments has joined other smaller companies (Fraunhofer, Ragsol, STACKFORCE, WIKA…) to form the MIOTY alliance in order to develop and promote a new LPWAN standard operating in the sub-GHz range called MIOTY.

  • ESP32-Vaquita-DSPG Board and SDK Support Alexa Integration and AWS IoT Core Cloud Service
  • Rugged embedded PC supports Linux on Apollo Lake

    Nexcom’s rugged, Linux-ready “NISE 108” embedded computer has an Apollo Lake Celeron, triple display support with dual DP, 2x GbE, 4x USB, 3x COM, and M.2 and mini-PCIe expansion.

    [...]

    Designed for rugged industrial automation applications in factory, agricultural, and service settings, with special suitability for agro-industrial jobs, the aluminum and metal constructed NISE 108 supports -5 to 55°C operation with ambient air flow. The IEC60068-2-27 compliant shock protection is listed as 20G (HDD) or 50G (SSD) at half-sine, 11ms. Random vibration resistance is rated at 0.5Grms @ 5~500 Hz per IEC60068-2-64 for an HDD and 2Grms with SSD. There’s also 10% to 95% (non-condensing) relative humidity tolerance.

    The NISE 108 supports up to 8GB DDR3L-1866 via a single socket. There’s a 2.5-inch storage bay and an M.2 2242 socket, both with the older SATA 2.0 support. A mini-PCIe slot supports WiFi and cellular connections with the help of dual antenna holes.

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