Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 21 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Truths srlinuxx 23/06/2011 - 6:30pm
Blog entry Zentyal Linux, a usable Linux Server fieldyweb 28/10/2011 - 10:32pm
Blog entry 6 Linux as a Service Distros you should know about.. fieldyweb 26/10/2011 - 10:18pm
Blog entry Konqueror in KDE4. It's not so terrible, I guess. blackbelt_jones 1 25/10/2011 - 12:10am
Blog entry Sabayon 7 GNOME 3 review finid 20/10/2011 - 2:33am
Blog entry My plan to use KDE3 forever. blackbelt_jones 18/10/2011 - 9:19pm
Blog entry OpenIndiana Desktop 151 review finid 15/10/2011 - 4:17pm
Blog entry ChromeOS in VirtualBox Texstar 09/08/2011 - 7:56am
Blog entry Fred srlinuxx 5 22/07/2011 - 3:51pm
Blog entry CentOS 6.0 finid 11/07/2011 - 10:41am

Security: ECB, Bluetooth and AppArmor Crash Course

Filed under
Security
  • ECB server hacked – Data disclosure of the European Central Bank – Bank hacks from Mexico to Bangladesh

    The Europeans probably do not even know about „what is going on“ and according to ex finance minister of Greece – finance ministers do not have a lot to say in the ECB – the IMF has – there are no recordings of the meetings of „The Eurogroup“ – so transparency over decision making processes is rather bad.

    After all just like the (more or less ideal) „big brother“ the FED it is not under direct democratic influence – does what it wants – every word the FED CEO says is analyzed and influences financial market decisions.

    „One of the sites of the European Central Bank (ECB) has been hacked. The attackers gained access to sensitive users ‚ information, however, the internal system of the Bank has not been compromised.

  • Specification vulnerability in devices that speak Bluetooth is addressed

    The discovery of a flaw in Bluetooth specification that could enable an attack to spy on your information made news this week; the attacker could be able to weaken the encryption of Bluetooth devices and snoop on communications or send falsified ones to take over a device, said The Verge.

  • FrOSCon 2019 - openSUSE booth & AppArmor Crash Course

    Last weekend, I was at FrOSCon - a great Open Source conference in Sankt Augustin, Germany. We (Sarah, Marcel and Sleepy ran the openSUSE booth, answered lots of questions about openSUSE and gave the visitors some goodies - serious and funny (hi OBS team!) stickers, openSUSE hats, backpacks and magazines featuring openSUSE Leap. We also had a big plush geeko, but instead of doing a boring raffle, we played openSUSE Jeopardy where the candidates had to ask the right questions about Linux and openSUSE for the answers I provided.

Manjaro 18.0.4 Illyria Xfce review - Nice but somewhat crude

Filed under
Reviews

Overall, Manjaro 18.0.4 Illyria Xfce is a decent distro. It has lots of good and unique points. Network, media and phone support is good. You get a colorful repertoire of high-quality programs, the performance and battery life are excellent, and the desktop is fairly pretty. The system was also quite robust and stable.

But then, there were issues - including inconsistent behavior compared to the Plasma crop. The installation can be a bit friendlier (as Plasma one does). The package management remains the Achilles' Heel of this distro. Having too many frontends is confusing, and none of them do a great job. The messages on dependencies, the need for AUR (if you want fancy stuff), and such all create unnecessary confusing. There were also tons of visual papercuts, and I struggled getting things in order. All in all, Manjaro is getting better all the time, but it is still too geeky for the common person, as it breaks the fourth wall of nerdiness too often. 7/10, and I hope it can sort itself out and continue to deliver the unique, fun stuff that gets sidelined by the rough edges.

Read more

Top 10 Best Open Source Speech Recognition Tools for Linux

Filed under
Software

Speech is a popular and smart method in modern time to make interaction with electronic devices. As we know, there are many open source speech recognition tools available on different platforms. From the beginning of this technology, it has been improved simultaneously in understanding the human voice. This is the reason; it has now engaged a lot of professionals than before. The technical advancement is strong enough to make it more clear to the common people.

Read more

Slackware, the Longest Active Linux Distro, Finally Has a Patreon Page

Filed under
Slack

"Slackware is the longest active Linux distribution project, founded in 1993," writes TheBAFH (Slashdot reader #68,624).

"Today there are many Linux distributions available, but I've remained dedicated to this project as I believe it still holds an important place in the Linux ecosystem," writes Patrick J. Volkerding on a new Patreon page. He adds that Slackware's users "know that Slackware can be trusted not to constantly change the way things work, so that your investment in learning Slackware lasts longer than it would with a system that's a moving target... Your support is greatly appreciated, and will make it possible for me to continue to maintain this project."

Read more

See Ubuntu Desktop Running on a Samsung Galaxy S10

Filed under
Ubuntu

I might have written about its availability a few times, but until today I had never actually seen Ubuntu 16.04 LTS running on a Samsung smartphone.

Don’t panic, you haven’t missed any major announcements and Samsung hasn’t started to sell phones with Ubuntu pre-loaded. I’m instead referring to the “Linux on DeX” development experience.

DeX is nifty bit of software tech that lets (select) Samsung devices running Android drive a more traditional “desktop” experience when connected to an external monitor, keyboard and mouse.

“Turn your Galaxy devices into a PC-like experience with a single cable,” Samsung say.

Additionally, ‘Linux on DeX’ is an Android app that’s only available as part of DeX. It lets users download and run a full desktop Linux experience using container technology on any supported Samsung Galaxy smartphone or tablet.

Read more

HarmonyOS Explained: A Viable Future Android Competitor or a Futile Attempt From Huawei?

Filed under
OS

During the annual Huawei developer conference, the company officially unveiled its custom HarmonyOS intended to create a unified ecosystem for potentially millions of users. Of course, this isn’t going to be as simple as churning out improved and feature-enriched versions of its Kirin chipsets for smartphones and tablets, so Huawei intends on taking its time with what could be a viable Android competitor, even though it hasn’t been marketed as such. Here we explain what is HarmonyOS, its unique feature set, and if it has the potential to somehow squirm its way in the duopoly iOS and Android have created for themselves.

Read more

Cool, but obscure X11 tools

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Software

A small collection of tools for the X Window System. For cool terminal tools, see Kristof Kovacs’ Cool, but obscure Unix tools. All applications have been tested on FreeBSD but should run on other Unix-like operating systems as well. This page is still work in progress …

Read more

Linux 5.3-rc5

Filed under
Linux

Another week, another -rc.

It's been calm, and nothing here stands out, except perhaps some of
the VM noise where we un-reverted some changes wrt node-local vs
hugepage allocations.

The rest is the usual driver fixes (usb, sound, nvme, habanalabs,
rdma..) some arch updates (arm64 and x86) along with some filesystem
fixes (afs and btrfs).

But all of it is really quite small.

Read more

Also: Linux 5.3-rc5 Released Following A Calm Week

AMD Ryzen 5 3600X Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Now that the new AMD Ryzen 3000 series are running great with the latest Linux distributions following prominent motherboard vendors issuing BIOS updates that correct the "RdRand" issue, we're moving on with looking at the performance of the rest of the Ryzen 3000 series line-up while having freshly re-tested the processors under Ubuntu 19.04. Up for exploration today is the AMD Ryzen 5 3600X, the six-core / 12-thread processor retailing for about $250 USD.

The AMD Ryzen 5 3600X has 6-cores / 12-threads while having a 3.8GHz base frequency and 4.4GHz maximum boost frequency. This CPU has a 95 Watt TDP, 32MB L3 cache, and other features in line with the rest of the Zen 2 family. AMD bundles the Ryzen 5 3600X retail CPU with their Wraith Spire cooler.

Read more

Intel Tries Again To Auto Enable GuC/HuC Functionality For Their Linux Graphics Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Intel previously tried auto-enabling GuC and HuC functionality within their Linux kernel graphics driver but ended up reverting the support since the driver didn't gracefully handle the scenarios of missing/corrupt firmware files. The driver should now be more robust in such situations so they will try again for turning on the automatic behavior, possibly for the upcoming Linux 5.4 cycle.

Intel GuC and HuC have been around since Skylake and used for graphics workload scheduling, some power management bits, and for select media capabilities. For newer hardware is also being used as part of HEVC/H.265 handling.

Read more

KDE Frameworks 5.61, Applications 19.08 in FreeBSD

Filed under
KDE
BSD

Recent releases were KDE Frameworks 5.61 and KDE Applications 19.08. These have both landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree, after Tobias did most of the work and I pushed the big red button.

Your FreeBSD machine will need to be following current ports – not the quarterly release branches, since we don’t backport to those.

All the modern bits have arrived, maintaining the KDE-FreeBSD team’s commitment to up-to-date software for the FreeBSD desktop. The one thing we’re currently lagging on is Qt 5.13. There’s a FreeBSD problem report tracking that update.

Read more

Dev branch moving towards Qt 6

Filed under
Development
KDE

As you know, Qt 5.14 will be branched pretty soon. After that I would expect that most new development work would start to be aimed towards Qt 6. As it looks right now, 5.15 will be a smaller release where we polish what we have in 5.14, and prepare some things for Qt 6.

To reflect that and help us all understand that the development focus is now towards Qt 6, I would like to propose that dev becomes the Qt 6 branch after we branched away 5.14 (and we merge wip/qt6 back into dev). We can then either create a 5.15 branch at the same time, or slightly later, once 5.14 has stabilised a bit more (e.g. after the beta or RC).

Read more

Also: Qt's Development Branch To Begin Forming Qt 6

How to Check Which Debian Version are you Running

Filed under
HowTos

Wondering which Debian version are you running? This tutorial teaches you several ways to check Debian version in the terminal.
Read more

Tilda: A Great Dropdown Terminal

Filed under
Development
OSS

If you need a full sized, full featured persistent terminal that appears and hides at a single keystroke, Tilda is your friend. Like most Free Software, it has too little documentation, and some conflicting documentation out on the web. That's OK, with this document make Tilda do a heck of a lot of what it was designed to do. This document didn't cover multiple Tilda instance or transparency, but I'm sure both will be easy for you to achieve with a little web search and experimentation.

Read more

I'm going to work full time on free software

Filed under
Development
OSS

A lot has changed since then. For one thing, I’ve learned the importance of free software in contrast to the “open source” I spoke of at the time. And, as I predicted, my eventual path toward achieving this goal was something I couldn’t imagine at the time.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Going Linux #375 · Listener Feedback

    In this episode, we have several questions about accessibility in Linux applications, we discuss a couple of cross-platform office suites that provide a bit better compatibility with Microsoft Office file formats, and we discuss problems and solutions for Ubuntu, Barrier, video and privacy and security. Lastly, we comment on Linux Journal's goodbye.

  • Install Java on Debian 9 Operating System
  • List of Inactive/Discontinued Linux Distributions

    This page provides information about the distributions that are no longer supported or developed starting from 2019 with details.

    This table contains the Linux Distribution Name, Distribution Initial Release Date, Distribution Latest Release Date, Reason for distribution inactive, and Distribution Age.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Five reasons Chromebooks are better than Windows laptops

Today, Windows users hold off for as long as possible before "updating" their PCs. Chrome OS users, on the other hand, have their systems updated every six weeks without a hitch. And, I might add, these updates take a minute or two instead of an hour or two. Chrome OS is also more secure than Windows. WIndows security violations pop up every blessed month. Sure, Chrome OS has had security holes, but I can't think of one that's been significantly exploited. Want a nightmare? Try migrating from an old Windows PC to a new one. Even if you're jumping from Windows 10 to Windows 10, there are no easy ways to do it. If you have a Microsoft account, rather than a local account, you must manually move your local files from third-party programs such as Photoshop On Chrome OS, you log in to your new Chromebook and -- ta-da! -- you're back in business. No fuss, no muss. Read more

Programming: Joget Operator, Python, LibreOffice, GNOME and KDE

  • Automating Low Code App Deployment on Red Hat OpenShift with the Joget Operator

    This is a guest post by Julian Khoo, VP Product Development and Co-Founder at Joget Inc. Julian has almost 20 years of experience in the IT industry, specifically in enterprise software development. He has been involved in the development of various products and platforms in application development, workflow management, content management, collaboration and e-commerce.

  • Python Histogram Plotting: NumPy, Matplotlib, Pandas & Seaborn

    In this course, you’ll be equipped to make production-quality, presentation-ready Python histogram plots with a range of choices and features. If you have introductory to intermediate knowledge in Python and statistics, then you can use this article as a one-stop shop for building and plotting histograms in Python using libraries from its scientific stack, including NumPy, Matplotlib, Pandas, and Seaborn.

  • PyCon 2020 Conference Site is here!

    Our bold design includes the Roberto Clemente Bridge, also known as the Sixth Street Bridge, which spans the Allegheny River in downtown Pittsburgh. The Pittsburgh Steelmark, was originally created for United States Steel Corporation to promote the attributes of steel: yellow lightens your work; orange brightens your leisure; and blue widens your world. The PPG Building, is a complex in downtown Pittsburgh, consisting of six buildings within three city blocks and five and a half acres. Named for its anchor tenant, PPG Industries, who initiated the project for its headquarters, the buildings are all of matching glass design consisting of 19,750 pieces of glass. Also included in the design are a fun snake, terminal window, and hardware related items. [...] As with any sponsorship, the benefits go both ways. Organizations have many options for sponsorship packages, and they all benefit from exposure to an ever growing audience of Python programmers, from those just getting started to 20 year veterans and every walk of life in between. If you're hiring, the Job Fair puts your organization within reach of a few thousand dedicated people who came to PyCon looking to sharpen their skills.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #382 (Aug. 20, 2019)
  • Python Qt5 - the QTimer class.
  • [LibreOffice GSoC] Week 12 Report

    It was The last week of GSoC program. Raal was working on testing all the project and the generated files and I help him by solving some bugs or add anything.

  • Sajeer Ahamed: Review | GSoC 2019

    I've been working on GStreamer based project of Gnome Foundation. GStreamer is a pipeline-based multimedia framework that links together a wide variety of media processing systems to complete complex workflows. The framework is based on plugins that will provide various codec and other functionality. The plugins can be linked and arranged in a pipeline. And most of the plugins are written in C. Now the developers are in an attempt to convert them to Rust which is more robust and easily maintainable. My task is to be a part of this conversion and to help fix issues related to this.

  • KDE's Onboarding Sprint: Making it easier to setup a development environment

    Suse were generous enough to offer two spacious and fully equipped offices at their headquarters to host the KDE sprints. We owe a special thanks and a big KDE hug to the OpenSuse team and in particular Douglas DeMaio and Fabian Vogt for being incredible hosts.

  • Third month progress

    I am here presenting you with my final month GSoC project report. I will be providing the links to my work at the end of the section. Final month of the work period was much more hectic and tiring than the first couple of months. I had been busy more than I had anticipated. Nonetheless, I had to write code which I enjoyed writing : ) . In the first half of this work period, I was focused on completing the left-over QDBus communication from the phase 2, which I did successfully. But as when I thought my task was all over, I was faced with some regression in the code, which I utilised my rest half a month to fix it. [...] As I had said above in the intro, I was faced with some real difficulty during the second half of the work period. As soon as I finished up QDBus thing, a regression was caused (Which I should have noticed before, my bad), helper was no longer started by the main application. I spent rest of the days brain-storming the issue but due to shortage of time, could not fix it. I plan to try fixing it in the next few days before GSoC ends(26th August), if I successfully do that, I will update the status here as well .

Games: Steam Play/Proton, GNU/Linux on Xbox, and UnderMine

  • CodeWeavers Reflects On The Wild Year Since Valve Introduced Steam Play / Proton

    This week marks one year since Valve rolled out their Proton beta for Steam Play to allow Windows games to gracefully run on Linux via this Wine downstream catered for Steam Linux gaming. It's been crazy since then with all of Valve's continued work on open-source graphics drivers, adding the likes of FAudio and D9VK to Proton, continuing to fund DXVK development for faster Direct3D-over-Vulkan, and many other infrastructure improvements and more to allow more Windows games to run on Linux and to do so well and speedy.

  • Turn your Xbox console into a home PC with this guide

    If you’ve ever wondered if you can turn your Xbox into a PC, you came to the right place. Because the Xbox console has the same hardware specifications as some older computer desktops, you will be able to convert it to a fully functioning PC. Unfortunately, you will not be able to install Windows on your console, but you can use the Linux operating system. In this article you will find out what items you’re going to need in order to make this happen, and also the steps you need to follow to accomplish this.

  • Action-adventure roguelike UnderMine now available in Early Access

    UnderMine from developer Thorium is an action-adventure roguelike with a bit of RPG tossed in, it's now in Early Access with Linux support. [...] Featuring some gameplay elements found in the likes of The Binding of Isaac, you proceed further down the UnderMine, going room to room digging for treasure and taking down enemies. There's also some RPG style rogue-lite progression involved too, as you're able to find powerful items and upgrades as you explore to prepare you for further runs.

GNU Scientific Library 2.6 released

Version 2.6 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release introduces major performance improvements to common linear algebra matrix factorizations, as well as numerous new features and bug fixes. The full NEWS file entry is appended below. The file details for this release are: ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsl/gsl-2.6.tar.gz ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsl/gsl-2.6.tar.gz.sig The GSL project homepage is http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/ GSL is free software distributed under the GNU General Public License. Thanks to everyone who reported bugs and contributed improvements. Patrick Alken Read more