Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 04 Apr 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Audiocasts/Shows: Choose Linux, The Linux Link Tech Show, Bad Voltage

Filed under
GNU
Linux

You Can Now Buy a PinePhone Preloaded with Ubuntu Touch

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Touch, also known by the name UBports, is a community-maintained version of Ubuntu for phones and tablets based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. It is a direct continuation of the codebase Canonical cancelled a few years back.

From today you (and anyone else interested) can preorder a PinePhone Community Edition with UBports direct from the Pine64 Store.

Read more

Kernel: New LWN Articles and SELinux in Next Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Automatic buffer selection for io_uring

    The io_uring subsystem has, in the last year, redefined how asynchronous I/O is done on Linux systems. As this subsystem grows in both capability and users, though, it starts to run into limitations in the types of operations that can be expressed. That is driving a number of changes in how operations are programmed for io_uring. One example is the mechanisms considered for carrying a file descriptor between operations that was covered here in early March. Another has to do with how I/O buffers are chosen for operations.
    As io_uring developer Jens Axboe describes in this patch set, the usual mode for programs that handle large numbers of file descriptors is to use poll() to find out which descriptors are ready for I/O, then making separate calls to actually perform that I/O. One could use io_uring in this mode, but it defeats one of the purposes of the whole exercise: avoiding system calls whenever possible. The io_uring way of doing things is to just queue an asynchronous operation on every file descriptor, then react to the resulting events whenever one of those operations is executed.

    Working that way can indeed reduce system calls — all the way to zero if the request ring is kept full. But it also requires allocating a separate I/O buffer for each of those queued operations, even though many of them may not execute for an indefinite period of time. The poll() method, instead, allows an application to defer buffer allocation until a buffer is actually needed. Losing that flexibility can result in significantly higher memory use for applications that keep a large number of operations outstanding.

  • Working-set protection for anonymous pages

    A bit of background may be helpful for understanding how this patch set works; we'll start with a highly oversimplified picture, then add some details as we go.
    Virtual-memory systems allow applications to address far more memory than can actually fit into the physical memory installed in the system, so a significant part of any given process's address space is likely to exist only on secondary storage at any given time. Obviously, the pages that are in physical memory should be the ones that the process is going to use in the near future. The kernel cannot know for sure which pages will be useful, though, so it must fall back onto a set of heuristics that allow it to guess as well as it can.

    Some of those heuristics are reasonably straightforward. For example, if a process is observed to be working through a file sequentially, chances are pretty good that it will soon be wanting the pages of the file immediately after those it is accessing now. Another heuristic, found at the core of almost any virtual-memory implementation, is that pages that have been used recently are likely to be used in the future, while those that have languished unused for a while may not be worth keeping around.

    To implement that last approach, the kernel maintains a "least-recently used" (LRU) list; all user-space pages in physical memory are kept on that list. The kernel occasionally checks the pages on the LRU list and moves those that have been accessed recently to the head of the list. When more memory is needed, to bring in pages from secondary storage, for example, pages at the tail end of the list are reclaimed.

    In truth, the kernel maintains more than one LRU list. To begin with, the "LRU list" is actually two lists: the "active" and "inactive" lists. The active list functions mostly as described in the previous paragraph, except that, when pages fall off the tail of the list, they are put onto the inactive list instead. At that point, the protections on those pages are set to disallow all user-space access. Should some process access one of those pages, a "soft" page fault will result; the page will be made accessible again and returned to the active list. When memory is needed, pages will be reclaimed from the inactive list.

  • SELinux Seeing Performance Improvements With Linux 5.7

    A few months back when we last looked at the performance impact of having SELinux enabled there was a hit but not too bad for most workloads. But we'll need to take another look soon as with the Linux 5.7 kernel are some performance improvements and more for SELinux.

    The NSA-backed Security Enhanced Linux has seen a fair amount of work build up for the now-open Linux 5.7 kernel merge window.

Free and Open Source Software Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Selling Free and Open Source Software? With DRM?

    “What is everyones feelings on buying free/open source software? And if we are ok with that could we put DRM on the source code?" - Tom Ohhhhhh, boy. These are two intense questions. Short answer: Buying Free and Open Source Software = Great! Including DRM in, on, or anywhere near Free and Open Source Software (including on the source code itself) = The Opposite of Great!

  • Open Source Code - The Future of User Privacy

    Will we see more and more open source software in the future, or is this a passing trend that will die off eventually?

  • Helping FOSS conferences in the face of a pandemic

    The effects of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic are horrific and far-reaching; we really do not yet know just how bad it will get. One far less serious area that has been affected is conferences for and about free and open-source software (FOSS). On the grand scale, these problems are pretty low on the priority list. There are a fair number of non-profit organizations behind the gatherings, however, that have spent considerable sums setting up now-canceled events or depend on the conferences for a big chunk of their budget—or both. A new organization, FOSS Responders, has formed to try to help out.

Working Remotely With GNU/Linux: Jitsi, RoamingProfiles and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Video conferencing with Jitsi

    Spring is coming to the northern hemisphere, and one's thoughts naturally turn to ... being locked up inside the house and not allowed to go anywhere. That has, in turn, led to an increasing interest in alternative mechanisms for keeping up with family and coworkers, especially video conferencing. There are a number of proprietary video-conferencing services out there; your editor decided to look into what solutions exist in the free-software realm. It turns out that there are a few; the first to be looked at is Jitsi.

    Jitsi is, in fact a collection of components, written mostly in Java (and JavaScript) and released under the Apache license. At the core is Jitsi Videobridge, which implements multi-participant video conferences, and Jitsi Meet, which implements the client side. Various other components live under the hood and are likely to only come to one's attention if something goes wrong with them. There is also a Jitsi Desktop application, but that has been superseded by the browser interface and is considered "legacy" at this point.

  • Q: RoamingProfiles under GNU/Linux? What's your Best Practice?

    This post is an open question to the wide range of GNU/Linux site admins out there. Possibly some of you have the joy of maintaining GNU/Linux also on user endpoint devices (i.e. user workstations, user notebooks, etc.), not only on corporate servers.

    TL;DR; In the context of a customer project, I am researching ways of mimicking (or inventing anew) a feature well known (and sometimes also well hated) from the MS Windows world: Roaming User Profiles. If anyone does have any input on that, please contact me (OFTC/Freenode IRC, Telegram, email). I am curious what your solution may be.

  • Must Have Apps For New Linux Users In 2020

    If you are a Windows user and recently shifted to Linux based platforms then you might be confused or wondering what to do, or how to play music, how to edit documents and so on.

    This post is for you if you are fresh or new Linux users and need some help with the transition from Windows to Linux.

Servers: 5G, Cloudflare Traffic Hoard and Kubernetes 1.18 Feature Server-side Apply

Filed under
Server
  • Ubuntu Blog: Edge AI in a 5G world – part 2: Why make the cell tower smart?

    AI training & ML operationsDecades of Moore’s Law have given us smartphones at a price we’re willing to pay but IoT devices need to be much cheaper than that. Adding today’s fastest CPUs or GPUs to IoT devices costs a significant amount which put a hard limit on what the market is currently willing to buy at scale.

    The IoT devices that are currently on the market are usually underpowered and have limited connectivity. With 5G connectivity and shared compute resources at the Edge these constrained devices will soon be able to do much more.

    For instance, adding a GPU to each IoT device for the purposes of AI model inference would mean a significant increase in the hardware bill of materials. This cost would be passed onto the consumer and because it is more expensive would drastically reduce the target audience. Instead, 5G allows for heavy computation to be offloaded to nearby shared GPUs and get a response with minimal latency.

    We will dive into this approach in the next section.

  • Tech Giants Team Up to Launch Open Source 5G Infrastructure Management Tool

    “5G and Edge Computing industry initiatives will require large-scale and geographically distributed multi-vendor infrastructure deployments”

    HPE and Intel are working with open source partners such as Red Hat to create a 5G distributed infrastructure management tool that could potentially help telecommunications firms get past the difficulty of installing 5G system into sites that hold infrastructure belonging to multiple vendors.

    The project will be donated to the Linux Foundation, with release scheduled for later in Q2 2020. It will be accessible via: www.linuxfoundation.org.

  • Cloudflare announces free VPN tool WARP for Windows and macOS, with Linux to follow

    If you're in the market for a free VPN for your desktop PC or laptop, Cloudflare will soon have a new offering.

    Following on from the success of its free VPN for mobile devices, the company that's also behind the 1.1.1.1 DNS resolver is now bringing WARP to Windows and macOS -- and there is a Linux version in the works. Cloudflare's WARP is currently available in beta, but not everyone will be able to get access to it straight away.

  • Kubernetes 1.18 Feature Server-side Apply Beta 2

    Server-side Apply is an important effort to migrate “kubectl apply” to the apiserver. It was started in 2018 by the Apply working group.

    [...]

    Server-side Apply works by keeping track of which actor of the system has changed each field of an object. It does so by diffing all updates to objects, and recording all the fields that have changed as well the time of the operation. All this information is stored in the managedFields in the metadata of objects. Since objects can have many fields, this field can be quite large.

    When someone applies, we can then use the information stored within managedFields to report relevant conflicts and help the merge algorithm to do the right thing.

Programming: Visual Programming, GCC, Eclipse, Red Hat Developers, BASIC, Python, Bash, Pine64 and Raspi

Filed under
Development
  • QuickDAQ.mikroBUS Development Board Leverages Visual Programming and MikroE Click Boards (Crowdfunding)

    mikroBUS is a socket interface that allows you to connect MikroElektronik (MikroE) Click add-on boards that can be buttons, sensors, a servo controller, a wireless module, and practically anything you may think of since there are over 700 Click boards to choose from.

  • GCC 10 Release Candidate Likely Hitting In The Next Few Weeks

    The month of April usually sees the new annual GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) feature releases and for GCC 10 in the form of GCC 10.1 as the first stable release in the series does stand chances of releasing this month.

    SUSE's Richard Biener provided the latest GCC 10 status report on Wednesday. He notes there still are 21 bugs to fix (or demote to a lower priority regression) before they hit the milestone of no "P1" regressions.

  • Eclipse Foundation offers open-source alternative to Visual Studio Code

    The Eclipse Foundation just released version 1.0 of an open-source alternative to Visual Studio Code called Eclipse Theia. Theia is an extensible platform that allows developers to create multi-language cloud and desktop IDEs, allowing them to create entirely new developer experiences.

    According to the Eclipse Foundation, the differences between Theia and Visual Studio Code are that Theia has a more modular architecture, Theia was designed from the ground to run on desktop and cloud, and Theia was developed under community-driven and vendor-neutral governance of the Eclipse Foundation.

  • Red Hat Developers: How to write an ABI compliance checker using Libabigail

    I’ve previously written about the challenges of ensuring forward compatibility for application binary interfaces (ABIs) exposed by native shared libraries. This article introduces the other side of the equation: How to verify ABI backward compatibility for upstream projects.

    If you’ve read my previous article, you’ve already been introduced to Libabigail, a static-code analysis and instrumentation library for constructing, manipulating, serializing, and de-serializing ABI-relevant artifacts.

    In this article, I’ll show you how to build a Python-based checker that uses Libabigail to verify the backward compatibility of ABIs in a shared library. For this case, we’ll focus on ABIs for shared libraries in the executable and linkable format (ELF) binary format that runs on Linux-based operating systems.

    Note: This tutorial assumes that you have Libabigail and its associated command-line tools, abidw and abidiff installed and set up in your development environment. See the Libabigail documentation for a guide to getting and installing Libabigail.

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn BASIC

    BASIC (Beginner’s All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) is a family of general-purpose, high-level programming languages whose design philosophy emphasizes ease of use. In 1964, John G. Kemeny and Thomas E. Kurtz designed the original BASIC language at Dartmouth College. They wanted to enable students in fields other than science and mathematics to use computers. At the time, nearly all use of computers required writing custom software, which was something only scientists and mathematicians tended to learn.

    The advent of the personal computer was crucial to the success of BASIC. The language was designed for hobbyists, and as personal computers became more accessible to this audience, books of BASIC programs and BASIC games surged in popularity.

    BASIC is generally not regarded as the easiest way to take the first steps in learning the art of programming. But it does not hinder beginners from learning how to program, or teach them bad habits. And it’s the highest low-level language. Even today, there remains value in learning BASIC.

    Here’s our recommended tutorials to learn BASIC. If you’re looking for free BASIC programming books, check here.

  • The 20 Best Python Tips and Tricks You Must Know in 2020

    This well-crafted article will show how you can get good at Python. All these tips and tricks will make you a better Python Developer. If you are a beginner, you are in for a treat! Python is very easy to learn. Its syntax is very compact and clean. If you are up for it, you can master it within months. Python is truly ubiquitous. Software Development to Data Science, Machine Learning to Artificial Intelligence — you can do everything. Let’s show you how to become a Pythonista!

  • Get started with Bash scripting for sysadmins

    The Bash shell is definitely not the only shell out there, but it's one of the most powerful. This makes it a popular choice for systems administrators needing to develop serious applications that go beyond a simple "laundry list" of commands to run on a system. There are lots of great uses for other shells (I default to Tcsh for Git hooks, for instance), but Bash is an easy choice for serious scripting, and here's why.

  • Pine64 is Giving Away 50,000 Face Masks to Makers

    It’s interesting how to see how different countries handle the COVID-19 pandemic response. In Asia, virtually everybody is now wearing a face mask, sometimes hand-made due to supply issues, but in Europe and North America at least, I’ve seen authorities tell healthy people not to wear a mask at all, and reserve them to health professionals. I’ve even seen some nasty comments on Twitter complaining about people wearing masks at the grocery store (in the US) as they took supply out of health professionals.

  • El Carrillon | The MagPi 92

Bodhi Linux 5.1 Review: Slightly Different Lightweight Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Bodhi Linux is a lightweight Linux distribution based on Ubuntu. Unlike most other distributions, Bodhi uses its own Moksha desktop and focuses on providing you a minimal setup to run on older computers.

Bodhi Linux was first introduced in 2011. It is designed with “minimalism, resource efficiency, and user choice” in mind. The devs strove to provide a “system that is functional but not bloated“. As such, it uses the lightweight Moksha Desktop and has only the basic applications preinstalled. The idea is to give the user a stable platform to build the system that they want. It is based on the latest Ubuntu LTS.

Read more

How to create a bootable USB drive for Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Are you ready to take the plunge into desktop Linux? Join the rapidly growing community of people who are living without the limits, lack of security, and lack of privacy afforded by proprietary operating systems. The question I had in the beginning was: How do I find a computer that runs Linux?

The answer is becoming increasingly more accessible—you can download an "ISO." An ISO is an archive file that contains an identical copy of the image that could come on a CD or DVD. The easiest way to get started with desktop Linux is to use virtualization software, but most of the time, I prefer bare metal. You can find an ISO file at Fedora, Ubuntu, ElementaryOS, and many other Linux distributions at Distrowatch.

Read more

Qt Creator 4.11.2 released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.11.2!

We fixed the default target project when creating files with wizards, and the debugging of Qt Quick tests. We also got rid of several issues with the editor. Have a look at our changes file for a more complete list.

The opensource version is available on the Qt download page under "Qt Creator", and you find commercially licensed packages on the Qt Account Portal. Qt Creator 4.11.2 is also available as an update in the online installer. Please post issues in our bug tracker. You can also find us on IRC on #qt-creator on chat.freenode.net, and on the Qt Creator mailing list.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • More good news: Medical equipment is still prone to [cracker] attacks [iophk: Windows TCO]

    A new report from Unit 42 says 72% of health care networks mix [Internet] of things (IoT) and information technology assets, allowing malware to spread from users’ computers to vulnerable IoT devices on the same network. The report also offers a lot of data on non-medical IoT attacks.

    There is a 41% rate of attacks exploiting device vulnerabilities, as IT-borne attacks scan through network-connected devices in an attempt to exploit known weaknesses. And Unit 42 has seen a shift from IoT botnets conducting denial-of-service attacks to more sophisticated attacks targeting patient identities, corporate data, and monetary profit via ransomware.

  • Conficker a Twelve Years Old Malware Attack Connected Objects [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Twelve years after its creation Conficker malware is now attacking connected objects. The American firm Palo Alto Networks announces that it has detected Conficker on the connected devices of a hospital, activating a resurgence of the twelve-year-old computer worm. It calls on all owners of connected objects to adopt the security measures recommended by specialists.

    According to a report released Tuesday, March 10, 2020, by IT expert Palo Alto Networks, a twelve years old computer worm called Conficker has recently made a comeback. The latter, which emerged in 2008 by taking advantage of security vulnerabilities in Microsoft’s Windows XP operating system, has generated a whole network of zombie machines.

    In 2009, Conficker reportedly infected up to 15 million machines. Still active, although it is considered a minor phenomenon and without real risk, it still infected some 400,000 computers in 2015. The proliferation of connected objects would have increased this number to 500,000 devices today.

  • [Older] Maastricht Univ. paid €250K to ransomware [attackers]: report [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Maastricht University paid between 200 thousand and 300 thousand euros to [attackers] who had blocked access to the university's digital systems with ransomware, various people involved told the Volkskrant. The university board was forced to pay because the university's backups were also hijacked. The backups [sic] - stored on the university servers - contain research data and data from students and staff from the past decades.

  • [Older] University of Maastricht says it paid [attackers] 200,000-euro ransom [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The University of Maastricht on Wednesday disclosed that it had paid [attackers] a ransom of 30 bitcoin — at the time worth 200,000 euros ($220,000) — to unblock its computer systems, including email and computers, after an attack that unfolded on Dec. 24.

  • [Older] Maastricht University Pays 30 Bitcoins as Ransom to TA505 Group[iophk: Windows TCO]

    A management summary of the Fox-IT report and Maastricht University’s response found that during the time frame of October 15 to 23 December 2019 (inclusive of both dates), the TA505 gained control over multiple servers. Following is the timeline of the events in the leadup to the final ransomware attack: [...]

  • FBI warns Zoom, teleconference meetings vulnerable to hijacking

    “The FBI has received multiple reports of conferences being disrupted by pornographic and/or hate images and threatening language,” the FBI cautioned. “As individuals continue the transition to online lessons and meetings, the FBI recommends exercising due diligence and caution in your cybersecurity efforts.”

    It’s not just private businesses and children whose meetings could be Zoombombed. Privacy and security issues in conferencing software may also pose risks to national security, as world leaders convene Zoom meetings. In some cases, world leaders such as U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson have shared screenshots of their teleconferencing publicly only to reveal Zoom meeting IDs, raising concerns that sensitive information could be compromised.

  • Qakbot malspam sent from an infected Windows host [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Every once in a while, I'll see spambot-style traffic from the Windows hosts I infect in my lab environment. On Tuesday 2020-03-31, this happened during a Qakbot infection. I've covered examining Qakbot traffic before, but that didn't include examples of spambot emails sent from an infected Windows computer. Today's diary provides a quick review of some email examples from spambot traffic by my Qakbot-infected lab host.

  • Varonis Exposes Global Cyber Campaign: C2 Server Actively Compromising Thousands of Victims [iophk: Windows TCO]

    During the analysis, we reversed this strain of Qbot and identified the attacker’s active command and control server, allowing us to determine the scale of the attack. Based on direct observation of the C2 server, thousands of victims around the globe are compromised and under active control by the attackers. Additional information uncovered from the C&C server exposed traces of the threat actors behind this campaign.

    [...]

    Qbot (or Qakbot) was first identified in 2009 and has evolved significantly. It is primarily designed for collecting browsing activity and data related to financial websites. Its worm-like capabilities allow it to spread across an organization’s network and infect other systems.

  • os x ssh fails when using -p flag/a>

    /usr/bin/ssh in macos 10.15.4 hangs if used with the -p flag to specify an alternate port and used with a hostname. This was not present in macos 10.15.3

What is Arch User Repository (AUR)? How to Use AUR on Arch and Manjaro Linux?

Filed under
HowTos

What is AUR? What are the pros and cons of using AUR? How to use AUR in Arch-based Linux distributions? This beginner’s guide answers all such questions.What is AUR? What are the pros and cons of using AUR? How to use AUR in Arch-based Linux distributions? This beginner’s guide answers all such questions.
Read more

How to Setup CTRL+ALT+DEL As Task Manager in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

If you are a beginner in Ubuntu Linux and migrated from Windows, this guide is for you. You can easily setup CTRL+ALT+DEL as Task Manager in Ubuntu Linux with just a few tweaks.
Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linaro Tech Days: Wayland, Weston & Open Source GPU drivers

    This week, Daniel Stone and Tomeu Vizoso will be taking part in Linaro Tech Days, a series of technical sessions presented live online via Zoom webinar and streamed on YouTube. These sessions are free to attend and open to the public, however registration is recommended to view full session details, joining instructions, and more.

  • Mesa Developers Discussing Again Whether To Fork Or Drop Non-Gallium3D Drivers

    Back in December was a developer discussion over dropping or forking non-Gallium3D drivers. Since then the Intel "Iris" Gallium3D driver has successfully become the default OpenGL driver for Broadwell/Gen8 and newer while the non-Gallium3D drivers continue to just face bit rot. The discussion over dropping/forking non-Gallium3D Mesa drivers has been reignited.

    This mailing list thread is active again with discussions over getting rid of the Mesa "classic" drivers to allow better focusing on the modern Gallium3D drivers and Mesa's Vulkan drivers. Eliminating the classic drivers avoids the associated maintenance burden and also allows simplifying/improving the modern drivers without risking breakage/regressions and other headaches with the old drivers.

  • Gumstix’s Nano carrier quartet includes Snapshot board for connecting 16x HD cams

    Gumstix has launched four customizable carriers for Nvidia’s Jetson Nano including a Nano Snapshot model with 4x GbE-switched Nano modules for driving up to 16x HD streams via RPi cameras. A Yocto SDK includes TensorFlow support.

    Gumstix has launched a quartet of carrier boards that build on Nvidia’s Jetson Nano module, joining other Nano carriers from Aetina, AntMicro, Auvidea, AverMedia, and Nvidia itself. The boards are billed as “Edge AI devices designed to meet the demands of machine-learning applications moving massive data from the networks edge.”

  • Extensions in Firefox 75

    In Firefox 75 we have a good mix of new features and bugfixes. Quite a few volunteer contributors landed patches for this release please join me in cheering for them!

  • D.I.Y. Coronavirus Solutions Are Gaining Steam

    Mr. Cavalcanti, 33, is the founder of the Open Source COVID19 Medical Supplies, a Facebook group that is crowdsourcing solutions to address the diminishing stock of medical equipment around the world. Mr. Cavalcanti, the founder and C.E.O. of MegaBots, a robotics company, initially intended to focus on ventilators. A front-line surgeon in the Bay Area convinced him to go after the low-hanging fruit: sanitizer, gloves, gowns and masks for medical professionals. Stacks of ventilators wouldn’t do the public any good if there were no health care workers to operate them.

  • Join Us for SUSECON Digital on Wednesday, May 20

    I am thrilled to share that SUSECON Digital will launch on Wednesday, March 20! Whether you are tuning in from your mobile device or on your computer, SUSCON Digital will help you Be the Difference by ensuring you get the tools, skills, and insights you need to simplify, modernize, and accelerate your business – for free! You can register now.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • One-Hot Encoding in Python with Pandas and Scikit-Learn

    In computer science, data can be represented in a lot of different ways, and naturally, every single one of them has its advantages as well as disadvantages in certain fields.

    Since computers are unable to process categorical data as these categories have no meaning for them, this information has to be prepared if we want a computer to be able to process it.

    This action is called preprocessing. A big part of preprocessing is encoding - representing every single piece of data in a way that a computer can understand (the name literally means "convert to computer code").

    In many branches of computer science, especially machine learning and digital circuit design, One-Hot Encoding is widely used.

    In this article, we will explain what one-hot encoding is and implement it in Python using a few popular choices, Pandas and Scikit-Learn. We'll also compare it's effectiveness to other types of representation in computers, its strong points and weaknesses, as well as its applications.

  • PyCharm: What’s New in R Plugin

    We’re releasing a new update of the R Plugin for PyCharm and other IntelliJ-based IDEs. If you haven’t tried the plugin yet, download it from our website.

    The plugin is available for 2019.3 versions of IDEs and for EAP builds of 2020.1. The latest update comes with many stability improvements and long-awaited features:

    1. You want your publications to look good, we now make it easy to get your graphs in exactly the size you need.

  • The Weekly Challenge #054

    For the first time, since I started participating the weekly challenges, I thought of doing one-liner. With handy CPAN modules, it was pretty straight forward in Perl. Even Raku with built-in features wasn’t far behind Perl. Like in the past, I learn something new in Raku every week. This week was no different. I will share what I learnt this time later.

  • How to compare objects in PHP

    PHP offers a simple way to compare objects using the comparison (==) and identity (===) operators.

    When using the comparison operator (==), object variables are compared in a simple manner: Two object instances are equal if they have the same attributes and values and are instances of the same class.

  • Fix Class ‘DOMDocument’ not found error
  • How JAMstack Is Shaking Up Static Application Development

    In an API-driven world that is increasingly mobile, JAMstack is well-positioned to become a de facto method for application architecture and delivery.

Screencast/Audiocasts/Shows: MakuluLinux, FLOSS Weekly, Pandemic Edition and Linux Headlines

  • MakuluLinux 2020 Flash Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at MakuluLinux 2020 Flash edition.

  • FLOSS Weekly 572: f-droid

    F-Droid is an installable catalog of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) applications for the Android platform. F-Droid is also a whole FOSS "app store kit", providing all the tools needed to set up and run an app store. It also includes complete build and release tools for managing the process of turning app source code into published builds.

  • Pandemic Edition

    Doc Searls and Katherine Druckman talk to Kyle Rankin, Petros Koutoupis, and Shawn Powers about the new realities we're facing as a result of COVID-19.

  • 2020-04-01 | Linux Headlines

    Canonical and MariaDB both enter the managed apps market, the WordPress 5.4 release expands its block-based editor, and Mozilla partners with another online monetization company while putting up cash in the fight against COVID-19.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Debian LTS Work and Tone Policing

Filed under
Debian
  • Debian LTS work, March 2020

    I was assigned 20 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative, and carried over 0.75 hours from February. I only worked 12.25 hours this month, so I will carry over 8.5 hours to April.

    I issued DLA 2114-1 for the update to linux-4.9.

  • Debian LTS and ELTS - March 2020

    Here is my transparent report for my work on the Debian Long Term Support (LTS) and Debian Extended Long Term Support (ELTS), which extend the security support for past Debian releases, as a paid contributor.

    In March, the monthly sponsored hours were split evenly among contributors depending on their max availability - I was assigned 30h for LTS (out of 30 max; all done) and 20h for ELTS (out of 20 max; I did 0).

    Most contributors claimed vulnerabilities by performing early CVE monitoring/triaging on their own, making me question the relevance of the Front-Desk role. It could be due to a transient combination of higher hours volume and lower open vulnerabilities.

  • Malaysia de-mystifies tone policing

    When the leaders of free software organizations want to avoid answering questions about money and conflicts of interest, one of their most popular fudges is to have some sidekick come in and complain about the tone of the question. These are the tone police. Beware.

    What, then, is the correct tone for women and volunteers to use when asking husbands and leaders about money?

    The Malaysian Government has provided an insight: try to sound like the cartoon character Doraemon.

    [...]

    In her infamous talk about enforcement at FOSDEM 2019, Molly de Blanc insists that it is necessary to follow through on community guidelines. She even gives a horrendous picture of a cat behind bars, how would Doraemon feel looking at that?

    This is no laughing matter unfortunately. A recent survey found one in five women still believe husbands deserve to beat ‘disobedient’ wives as they enforce Codes of Conduct in the home.

    As we read that, we couldn't help wondering if the rate of domestic homicides will increase in 2020 and if so, is the Code of Conduct to blame for that?

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Mesa, Nano, Redis, Git Update in openSUSE Tumbleweed

Another four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week. A notable package updated this week is a new major version of (gucharmap)[https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Gucharmap]. Plus several python package updates, nano, mesa, git and Xfce packages also had new minor updates. The most recent snapshot, 202000331 is trending well with a stable rating of 99 on the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. The GNOME Character Map, gucharmap, updated to version 13.0.0, but no changelog was provided. An update for glib2 2.62.6 is expected to be the final release of the stable 2.62.x series; maintenance efforts will be shifted to the newer 2.64.x series. The updated glib2 package fixed SOCKS5 username/password authentication. The 2.34 binutils package added and removed a few patches. GTK3 3.24.16 fixed problems with clipboard handling and fixed a crash in the Wayland input method. The package for creating business diagrams, kdiagram 2.6.2 fixed printing issue. The Linux Kernel updated to 5.5.13. A handful of Advanced Linux Sound Architecture changes were made in the kernel update. The 5.6.x kernel is expected to be released in a Tumbleweed snapshot soon. The libstorage-ng 4.2.71 package simplified combining disks with different block sizes into RAID. The programming language vala 0.46.7 made verious improvements and bug fixes and properly set CodeNode.error when reporting an error. Several xfce4 packages were updated and xfce4-pulseaudio-plugin 0.4.3 fixed various memory leaks and warnings and xterm 353 was updated. The yast2-firewall 4.2.4 packaged was updated and forces a reset of the firewalld API instance after modifying the service state and yast2-storage-ng 4.2.104 extended and improved the Application Programming Interface to get udev names for a block device The package to improve audio and video under Linux pipewire 0.3.1 switched the license to MIT and added fdupes BuildRequires and pass fdupes macro while removing duplicate files, which came in snapshot 20200326. The 1.1.9 spec-cleaner package drop travis and tox and now uses github actions. Several python arrived in this snapshot. Python-packaging 20.3 fixed a bug that caused a 32-bit OS that runs on a 64-bit ARM CPU (e.g. ARM-v8, aarch64), to report the wrong bitness and python-SQLAlchemy 1.3.15 fixed regression in 1.3.14. The Xfce file manager package, thunar 1.8.14 updated translations and reverted a bug that introduced a regression. The snapshot recorded a stable rating of 99. Read more [Post apparently removed[ Also: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/14

Sparky 5.11

A quarterly update point release of live/install media of Sparky 5.11 “Nibiru” of the stable line is out. This is a release based on Debian 10 “Buster”. Changes: – the base system upgraded from Debian stable repos as of March 1, 2020 – Linux kernel 4.19.98 LTS (PC) – Linux kernel 4.19.97 LTS (ARMHF) – added 9 new nature wallpapers captured by Aneta, Pavbaranov and me – Sparky repository changed to the named “nibiru” (“stable” works as before); no need to manually change the repo; see also: https://sparkylinux.org/sparky-named-repos/ – Firefox 68.6.0 ESR – Thunderbird 68.6.0 – LibreOffice 6.1.5 Read more

Steam Survey Points To Tiny Uptick In Linux Percentage For March

With the Steam Survey numbers out this week, the March 2020 statistics point to the Linux gaming marketshare ticking up by 0.04% to 0.87%. But in reality that is almost a rounding error and sticks to what we have largely been seeing in recent months of 0.8~0.9% for Linux gaming on Steam. Though even with the record number of users on Steam in March, it's good to see the Linux percentage didn't actually diminish -- at least according to the survey numbers. Read more

Python Programming

  • Analysis of the progress of COVID-19 in the world with Data Science.

    All the data in this article was made with Data Scientis tools. Given the circumstances the planet is experiencing at the moment, we show below a series of results after implementing Data Science techniques to monitor the virus. For the following analyzes, the data from the Johns repositories were taken Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering (JHU CSSE). As it is public knowledge, the advance of the pandemic is a worldwidede concer, that is why I consider interesting to be able to make an analysis of certain countries. Therefore we can see in the following graph how the curve of confirmed infected persons in countries such as USA, Italy, France and Argentina advances from the beginning to today.

  • Introduction to the Python HTTP header

    You can create your own custom headers for the HTTP destination using the Python HTTP header plugin of syslog-ng and Python scripts. The included example configuration just adds a simple counter to the headers but with a bit of coding you can resolve authentication problems or fine tune how data is handled at cloud-based logging and SIEM platforms, like Sumologic.

  • Announcing a new Sponsorship Program for Python Packaging

    The Packaging Working Group of the Python Software Foundation is launching an all-new sponsorship program to sustain and improve Python's packaging ecosystem. Funds raised through this program will go directly towards improving the tools that your company uses every day and sustaining the continued operation of the Python Package Index.

  • Python String Concatenation

    String concatenation means creating a new string by combining two or more string values. Many built-in methods and ‘+’ operator are used to combine string values in many programming languages. ‘+’ operator is also used in python to combine string values but it works differently than other scripting languages. In JavaScript, when a string value combines with the number value then the number value will convert automatically into the string and combines with the other string value. But if you do the same task in Python then it will generate an error because Python can’t convert the number into string automatically. Many other ways exist in Python to combine string values. This article shows how you can do string concatenation in Python in different ways. Here, spyder3 editor is used for writing and executing the scripts of this article.

  • Python String Replacement using Pattern

    Any string data can be replaced with another string in Python by using the replace() method. But if you want to replace any part of the string by matching a specific pattern then you have to use a regular expression. It is used to search a specific pattern in a particular string value and the string will be replaced with another string if any match found. Python uses ‘re’ module to use regular expression pattern in the script for searching or matching or replacing. Using regular expression patterns for string replacement is a little bit slower than normal replace() method but many complicated searches and replace can be done easily by using the pattern. You can replace a string in various ways using the pattern in Python. Some common uses of pattern to replace string are shown in this tutorial. Spyder3 editor is used here to write and run the script.

  • Python String startswith and endswith

    Sometimes we need to check the starting or the ending part of any string for the programming purpose. There are two built-in methods in Python to do the task. These are startswith() and endswith() methods. If any string starts with a given prefix then startswith() method will return true otherwise returns false and if any string ending with a given suffix then endswith() method will return true otherwise returns false. How these methods work and use in Python are shown in this tutorial. Spyder3 editor is used here to write and run the python script.

  • Examples are Awesome

    There are two things I look for whenever I check out an Opensource project or library that I want to use. 1. Screenshots (A picture is worth a thousand words). 2. Examples (Don't tell me what to do, show me how to do it). Having a fully working example (or many examples) helps me shape my thought process.

  • App Assisted Contact Tracing

    I don't know how I thought the world would look like 10 years ago, but a pandemic that prevents us from going outside was not what I was picturing. It's about three weeks now that I and my family are spending at home in Austria instead of going to work or having the kids at daycare, two of those weeks were under mandatory social distancing because of SARS-CoV-2. And as cute as social distancing and “flattening the curve” sounds at first, the consequences to our daily lives are beyond anything I could have imagined would happen in my lifetime. What is still conveniently forgotten is that the curve really only stays flat if we're doing this for a very, very long time. And quite frankly, I'm not sure for how long our society will be able to do this. Even just closing restaurants is costing tens of thousands of jobs and closing schools is going to set back the lives of many children growing up. Many people are currently separated from their loved ones with no easy way to get to them because international travel grinded to a halt.