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Tuesday, 18 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Software: NetworkManager, Browsers, Microsoft Powerpoint Alternatives and Guix Substitutes Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2019 - 6:09pm
Story Red Hat's OpenShift and Fedora's Latest Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2019 - 6:07pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2019 - 6:05pm
Story SUSE: SLE 12 Service Pack 5 Beta 1 and More Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2019 - 6:01pm
Story Programming/Development Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2019 - 5:57pm
Story Debian GNU/Linux riscv64 port in mid 2019 Roy Schestowitz 1 17/06/2019 - 5:49pm
Story Zorin OS 15 is here – Faster. Easier. More connected. Rianne Schestowitz 13 17/06/2019 - 5:39pm
Story Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Action News, Full Circle Magazine and Python Podcast Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2019 - 5:17pm
Story Debian: Cross-Version Benchmarks, Debian LTS and HubLinked Meeting in Dublin Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2019 - 5:13pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 17/06/2019 - 4:54pm

Tmax OS Releases Open Source OS as an Alternative to MS Windows

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Tmax OS will release the Open Edition (OE) of the Tmax Operating System (OS), an open source version of the Tmax OS that anyone can freely use. This will create an ecosystem for an alternative OS to Microsoft's (MS) Windows.

The Tmax OS OE has the same functionality as the existing Tmax OS commercial version, except that it limits some functions for the enterprise environment. Users can use a variety of applications such as Linux-based apps as well as its self-developed office program Two Office and the web browser Two Gate.

Tmax emphasized that it can provide stable and continuous Tmax OS OE upgrade and technical support as it has more than 400 professional researchers and technical personnel. Its graphical environment makes it easy for new MS Windows users to use the Tmax OS OE.

Read more

Meet Kdenlive: Free Open Source NLE That Aims for Professionals

Filed under
KDE
Movies

As the battle of the NLEs continues between the big four (Premiere Pro, FCPX, Avid, and DaVinci Resolve), there are a few underdogs that aim to conquer the market. One of them is Kdenlive.

It’s important to mention that this NLE is not new. The project was started by Jason Wood in 2002 and is now maintained by a small team of developers. Being an open source project constitutes as a significant advantage since it’s backed up by a massive community of contributors that have the privilege of improving and making the software to be more sharpened from an R&D point of view.

Read more

GreatFET One open source hacking tool

Filed under
Development
Hardware
OSS

Electronic enthusiasts, hobbyists, hackers and makers may be interested in a new open source piece of hardware called the GreatFET One, which has been designed to provide a “significant step up” in capabilities from GoodFET while making the design manufacturable at a lower cost than GoodFET.

“Whether you need an interface to an external chip, a logic analyzer, a debugger, or just a whole lot of pins to bit-bang, the versatile GreatFET One is the tool for you. Hi-Speed USB and a Python API allow GreatFET One to become your custom USB interface to the physical world.” The GreatFET One by Great Scott Gadgets is now available to purchase priced at $79.95 directly from the Adafruit online store.

Read more

LEDSpicer Is An Open Source Light Controller For Your Arcade Machine

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The project came about when [Patricio] was working on his Linux-based MAME cabinet, and realised there were limited software options to control his Ultimarc LED board. As the existing solutions lacked features, it was time to get coding.

LEDSpicer runs on Linux only, and requires compilation, but that’s not a huge hurdle for the average MAME fanatic. It comes with a wide variety of animations, as well as tools for creating attract modes and managing LEDs during gameplay. There are even audio-reactive modes available for your gaming pleasure. It’s open source too, so it’s easy to tinker with if there’s something you’d like to add yourself.

Read more

Wind River pumps new beans into embedded Linux

Filed under
OS
Linux
Hardware

It’s hard to know whether to pronounce software infrastructure company Wind River as wind (as in eaten too many beans, that thing that makes sails billow out) or wind (as in snakey, twisty) river.

It looks like its wind as in breezy mistrals on this link, so let’s go with that.

Whether it be winding or breezy, the company has this month updated its Wind River Linux with a release focused on ease of adoption of containers in embedded systems.

How do you make containers adoption easier? We’re glad you asked.

It’s all about offering pre-built containers, tools and documentation as well as support for frameworks such as Docker and Kubernetes.

Read more

Open Hardware: X-FAB RISC-V Microcontroller

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • X-FAB Silicon Foundries tapes-out open-source RISC-V MCU

    Together with crowd-sourcing IC platform partner Efabless Corporation, X-FAB Silicon Foundries has announced the first-silicon availability of the Efabless RISC-V System on Chip (SoC) reference design.

    This open-source semiconductor project went from design start to tape-out in less than three months using the Efabless design flow based on open-source tools. The mixed-signal SoC, called Raven, is based on the community developed ultra-low power PicoRV32 RISC-V core. Efabless has bench-tested the Raven at 100MHz, and based on simulations the design should be able to operate at up to 150MHz.

    The open-source top-level design uses X-FAB proprietary analog IP and is created with an open-source design flow. This hybrid open-source design brings the power of open innovation and at the same time protecting significant investment in proprietary IP.

  • X-FAB and Efabless Announce Successful First Silicon of Raven, An Open-Source RISC-V Microcontroller

    X-FAB Silicon Foundries, the leading analog/mixed-signal and specialty foundry, together with crowd-sourcing IC platform partner Efabless Corporation, today announced the successful first-silicon availability of the Efabless RISC-V System on Chip (SoC) reference design. This open-source semiconductor project went from design start to tape-out in less than three months using the Efabless design flow based on open-source tools. The mixed-signal SoC, called Raven, is based on the community developed ultra-low power PicoRV32 RISC-V core. Efabless has successfully bench-tested the Raven at 100MHz, and based on simulations the design should be able to operate at up to 150MHz.

  • X-FAB and Efabless Deliver Open Source Mixed-Signal SoC

    Mixed signal foundry X-FAB Silicon Foundries and crowd-sourcing IC platform Efabless Corp. have announced silicon availability of a RISC-V based mixed signal system-on-chip (SoC) reference design. The open-source semiconductor project went from design start to tape-out in less than three months using the Efabless design flow based on open-source tools.

  • X-Fab and Efabless announce Raven open-source RISC-V microcontroller

    X-Fab Silicon Foundries, an analog/mixed-signal and specialty foundry, and crowd-sourcing IC platform partner Efabless, has announced the silicon availability of the Efabless RISC-V system on chip (SoC) reference design. This open-source semiconductor project went from design start to tape-out in less than three months using the Efabless design flow based on open-source tools, they said.

    The mixed-signal SoC, called Raven, is based on the community developed ultra-low power PicoRV32 RISC-V core. Efabless has successfully bench-tested the Raven at 100MHz, and based on simulations the design should be able to operate at up to 150MHz, they added.

100+ Benchmarks Between Clear Linux vs. Arch-Based Manjaro Linux - Summer 2019 Tests

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering how Intel's performance-optimized Clear Linux is comparing to the Arch-based Manjaro Linux distribution, here are a number of benchmarks on the same Intel Core i7 8700K in seeing how these rolling-release distros are competing for summer 2019.

More than 100 benchmarks were run on Clear Linux and Manjaro Linux using their latest releases for providing the very latest packages.

The same Intel Core i7 8700K system with 16GB of RAM and NVMe solid-state storage was used as a good example distribution for comparing these distros. Some Debian Buster tests on the i7-8700K are also coming in shortly for adding to the comparison.

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Games: NetherWorld, Dota Underlords and DXVK

Filed under
Gaming
  • NetherWorld, an impressive looking and weird narrative pixel-art action game is coming to Linux

    Currently in development by Hungry Pixel, NetherWorld has a pretty impressive pixel-art visual style that will mix insane action with narrative elements and it's coming to Linux.

    The actual plot of the game sounds pretty wild, starting with a marriage crisis as your wife decides to leave you and so you head to the local Bar to drown your sorrows. One thing leads to another with some unexpected turns, as you go on some sort of twisted journey as you explore the darkest corners of the land of NetherWorld.

    Discovered thanks to IndieDB, the developer recently confirmed to me that it will be supporting Linux.

  • Dota Underlords from Valve is already quite addictive and they're improving it quickly

    With Dota Underlords available for testing, I've now taken a look at it (thanks Scaine!) and so far I've been quite impressed.

    Valve have essentially rewritten the rules of "Valve Time", considering how quickly they've made it available and how promptly they've been responding to feedback. They've already adjusted it so you can switch between a Mobile and PC style for the user interface, fixed up the Linux version nicely (it runs beautifully!), removed the odd character outlines from the PC version and so on. Honestly, I'm genuinely surprised at how fast Valve are reacting with it.

    Since this is apparently the next big thing, it's nice to see that Linux gamers can jump on in right away thanks to Valve. As a reminder, the original creator of the mod is making a stand-alone version for the Epic Games Store and the League of Legends developer Riot are also doing their own.

  • DXVK 1.2.2 released with performance improvements and bug fixes

    DXVK, the incredible project that provides a Vulkan-based layer for D3D11 and D3D10 games run with Wine has another release now available. DXVK 1.2.2 is quite a small point release but as always, it still brings with it some nice changes.

    This time around Team Sonic Racing has a bug fix to help some startup issues and Planet Coaster should also see less startup issues, although Planet Coaster does need "additional wine patches" as of Wine 4.10.

    Also in this release are some CPU overhead optimizations, improved compute shader performance on Nvidia GPUs in some games with Nier: Automata being one that was noted and minor bugs were solved that caused wine test failures.

New features for kde.org

Filed under
KDE

The application page now contains some additional metadata information. This can help search engines to better understand the content of the webpage.

Read more

Also: KDE Plasma 5.16 Released

Stable kernels 5.1.10, 4.19.51, and 4.14.126

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.1.10

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.10 kernel.

    All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.19.51
  • Linux 4.14.126

My personal journey from MIT to GPL

Filed under
GNU
Legal

As I got started writing open source software, I generally preferred the MIT license. I actually made fun of the “copyleft” GPL licenses, on the grounds that they are less free. I still hold this opinion today: the GPL license is less free than the MIT license - but today, I believe this in a good way.

[...]

I don’t plan on relicensing my historical projects, but my new projects have used the GPL family of licenses for a while now. I think you should seriously consider it as well.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Yubico recalls government-grade security keys due security bug

    If you buy a government-grade security key, the one thing you really want from it is government-grade security. It's the very dictionary definition of "you had one job." That's why it's somewhat embarrassing that Yubico has put out a recall notice on its FIPS series of authentication keys which, it turns out, aren't completely secure.

  • [Microsoft's] EternalBlue exploit surfaces in bog standard mining attack Featured

    A bog standard attack aimed at planting a cryptocurrency miner has been found to be using advanced targeted attack tools as well, the security firm Trend Micro says, pointing out that this behaviour marks a departure from the norm.

Kernel: Systemd, DXVK, Intel and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Systemd Is Now Seeing Continuous Fuzzing By Fuzzit

    In hoping to catch more bugs quickly, systemd now has continuous fuzzing integration via the new "Fuzzit" platform that provides continuous fuzzing as a service. 

    New this week to systemd is the continuous fuzzing integration where every pull request / push will see some quick checks carried out while on a daily basis will be fuzzed in full for all targets.

  •  

  • DXVK 1.2.2 Brings Minor CPU Overhead Optimizations, Game Fixes

    In time for those planning to spend some time this weekend gaming, DXVK lead developer Philip Rebohle announced the release of DXVK 1.2.2 that will hopefully soon be integrated as part of a Proton update for Steam Play but right now can be built from source.

    While certain upstream Wine developers express DXVK being a "dead end" and are optimistic in favor of piping their WineD3D implementation over Vulkan, for Linux gamers today wanting to enjoy D3D11 Windows games on Linux the DXVK library continues working out splendid with great performance and running many Direct3D games with much better performance over the current WineD3D OpenGL code.

  • Intel 19.23.13131 OpenCL NEO Stack Adds Comet Lake Support

    We've seen the Intel Comet Lake support get pieced together in recent months in the different components making up the Intel Linux graphics stack while the compute-runtime is the latest addition. Comet Lake as a refresher is a planned successor to Coffeelake/Whiskeylake and expected to come out this year as yet more 9th Gen hardware. But Comet Lake should be interesting with rumored 10-core designs. Though with being more processors with Gen9 graphics, the Comet Lake Linux support basically boils down to adding in the new PCI IDs.

  • AMD Wires Its New Runtime Linker Into RadeonSI Gallium3D

    RadeonSI Gallium3D has already shifted over to using this new linker. Making use of the .rodata should help with efficiencies throughout the driver (more details in this forum thread) but at this point is mostly laying the groundwork for more improvements to be made moving forward.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Building IT Transformation Architecture with Red Hat OpenShift

    In the era of mobile applications, business challenges to the enterprise IT organizations are more dynamic than ever. Many enterprises have difficulties responding in time because of the inherent complexity and risk of integrating emerging technologies into existing IT architectures. In this article, I will share my experience on how to utilize Red Hat OpenShift as a “Middle Platform” (中台) for enterprises to construct its bimodal IT architecture with agile, scalable and open strategy.

    In the past year, I have discussed with many corporate customers–especially in the financial services industry–the challenges of digital transformation, and the solutions. Most of their difficulties are coming from “core systems” which have been working for more than 10 years.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-24

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Elections voting is open through 23:59 UTC on Thursday 20 June.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Copr's Dist-Git

    In Copr, we use dist-git to store sources as well. However, our use case is different. In the past, Copr only allowed to build from URL. You provided a URL to your SRC.RPM and Copr downloaded it and built it. This was a problem when the user wanted to resubmit the build. The original URL very often did not exists anymore. Therefore we came with an idea to store the SRC.RPM somewhere. And obviously, the dist-git was the first idea.

Software: FreeFileSync, Debian/GSOC, LibreOffice and Lightworks

Filed under
Software
  • File Synchronization App FreeFileSync Brings Another Update

    File synchronization software, FreeFileSync releases latest update with 10.13.

    FreeFileSync is a folder and file synchronization free software that is available for Linux, Windows and Mac. This software can sync between your devices files and folders and only sync the changed files/directories. That means it can identify the changed files and make sure to transfer those in backup systems.

    Armed with scheduling of transfers, JOB features for sync – this free and open source software is one of the best file sync/ backup software available today.

    FreeFileSync released 10.13 with bunch of big fixes and enhancements.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: GSoC Bi-Weekly Report - Week 1 and 2

    The idea is to package all the dependencies of Loomio and get Loomio easily installable on the Debian machines.

    The phase 1, that is, the first 4 weeks, were planned to package the Ruby and the Node dependencies. When I started off, I hit an obstacle. Little did we know about how to go about packaging complex applications like that.

    I have been helping out in packages like gitlab, diaspora, et al. And towards the end of the last week, we learned that loomio needs to be done like diaspora.

  • Annual Report 2018: LibreOffice Conference

    The LibreOffice Conference is the annual gathering of the community, our end-users, and everyone interested in free office software. Every year, it takes place in a different country and is supported by members of the LibreOffice commercial ecosystem. In 2018, the conference was organized by the young and dynamic Albanian community at Oficina in Tirana, from Wednesday, September 26, to Friday, September 28, the eight anniversary of the LibreOffice project. Here’s a quick video recap – read on for more details…

  • New Lightworks Beta Version 14.6 revision 114986 Now Available on Windows Linux and Mac!

    It is strongly recommended that users backup their project folder before installing any new Beta build of Lightworks.

    We are pleased to announce the second Beta of Lightworks 14.6 which includes many changes based on Forum feedback. Excellent work all round and we are hopeful that this Beta Cycle will be short lived. We hope you enjoy all the features and changes in the latest version which can be found in the : Changelog pages

  • Lightworks 14.6 Remains A Closed-Up Blob, But At Least The Linux Support Continues

    It was nearly a decade ago the high-end, commercial video software editing solution Lightworks announced they would be going open-source but to this day that milestone has yet to be materialized. Lightworks though does continue advancing with their v14.6 release on the horizon and at least their added Linux support continues to be expanded upon.

    EditShare, the company behind Lightworks, really dropped the ball when it came to their open-source plans. All that we've been able to gather over these years is that they hit some complexities with their original open-source plans and aren't committed enough in seeking to work through those issues to make the code public. So at the end of the day Lightworks is still a closed-source non-linear video editor, but at least it's one of the most feature-rich/professional-grade solutions with native Linux support.

KDE: Site Description Update, Boost and Meeting KDE in València

Filed under
KDE
  • Jonathan Riddell: KDE.org Description Update

    The KDE Applications website was a minimal possible change to move it from an unmaintained and incomplete site to a self-maintaining and complete site. It’s been fun to see it get picked up in places like Ubuntu Weekly News, Late Night Linux and chatting to people in real life they have seen it get an update. So clearly it’s important to keep our websites maintained. Alas the social and technical barriers are too high in KDE. My current hope is that the Promo team will take over the kde-www stuff giving it communication channels and transparancy that doesn’t currently exist. There is plenty more work to be done on kde.org/applications website to make it useful, do give me a ping if you want to help out.

  • Done with boost

    One of the so called pillar of the c++ world, boost, sucks a lot when it comes to documentation, I wouldn’t have to write more than one blog post if they had their documentation in place. It has been almost a month that I have started working on the Magnetic Lasso and I wasted most of the time fighting with boost instead of working on my algorithm. Okay, fine I am getting paid for it, I shouldn’t complain.

  • Meet KDE in València

    During the next days, we’ll be having several sprints in València.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux. Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight. When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores. And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course. . 133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads
    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root. Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases. That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.
  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019
    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.
  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes
    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications. Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.
  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want
    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight
    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.

NSA Back Doors in Windows Causing Chaos While Media is Obsessing Over DoS Linux Bug

  • U.S. Government Announces Critical Warning For Microsoft Windows Users
    The United States Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has gone public with a warning to Microsoft Windows users regarding a critical security vulnerability. By issuing the "update now" warning, CISA has joined the likes of Microsoft itself and the National Security Agency (NSA) in warning Windows users of the danger from the BlueKeep vulnerability. This latest warning, and many would argue the one with most gravitas, comes hot on the heels of Yaniv Balmas, the global head of cyber research at security vendor Check Point, telling me in an interview for SC Magazine UK that "it's now a race against the clock by cyber criminals which makes this vulnerability a ticking cyber bomb." Balmas also predicted that it will only be "a matter of weeks" before attackers started exploiting BlueKeep. The CISA alert appears to confirm this, stating that it has, "coordinated with external stakeholders and determined that Windows 2000 is vulnerable to BlueKeep." That it can confirm a remote code execution on Windows 2000 might not sound too frightening, this is an old operating system after all, it would be unwise to classify this as an exercise in fear, uncertainty and doubt. Until now, the exploits that have been developed, at least those seen in operation, did nothing more than crash the computer. Achieving remote code execution brings the specter of the BlueKeep worm into view as it brings control of infected machines to the attacker.
  • Netflix uncovers SACK Panic vuln that can bork Linux-based systems