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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 14 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Ubuntu 11.10: Screenshot preview finid 11/07/2011 - 8:09am
Blog entry Mandriva Desktop 2011 teaser finid 1 05/07/2011 - 2:40am
Blog entry Mozilla forms partnership with Tylenol Texstar 02/07/2011 - 1:04am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS KDE 2011.6 post installation tips. Texstar 28/06/2011 - 5:57am
Blog entry Welcome to the Jungle srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 8:24pm
Blog entry 2011 - Has Internet TV really moved forward, can you really cut the cable? fieldyweb 30/10/2011 - 6:10pm
Blog entry Mandriva Linux 2011TP (Tech Preview) - Quick Look gfranken 08/02/2011 - 6:46pm
Blog entry working quake 1 srlinuxx 25/11/2010 - 1:50am
Blog entry unreal gold install srlinuxx 24/11/2010 - 3:10am
Blog entry new quake 2 install srlinuxx 23/11/2010 - 7:41am

Firewalla Gold Intel-based Ubuntu Router Enables Multi-Gigabit Cyber Security (Crowdfunding)

Filed under
Ubuntu

We covered Firewalla based on NanoPi NEO board in mid-2018. The device is a tiny firewall, parental control, ad-blocker, and VPN appliance for end-users.

Since then they’ve launched Firewalla Blue based on NanoPi NEO2 SBC with Gigabit Ethernet and a faster processor, and now the company has just introduced the even more powerful Intel-based Firewalla Gold.

The device runs Ubuntu Linux so the users will have full access to the operating system with SSH, and will be allowed to install their own packages. Just like the original Firewalla (now Firewalla Red) and Firewalla Blue, Firewalla Gold comes with a web interface to let users easily control what happens on their networks with features such as cyber threats protections, VPN, DDNS, SSH, Adblocker configuration. Additionally, the Firewalla app for Android or iOS enables users to set-up parental control, VPN, monitor bandwidth usage (Monthly / Daily / Hourly), and more…

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Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Slated for Release on February 6th, 2020

Filed under
Ubuntu

Released in April 2018, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is the latest LTS (Long Term Support) version of the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, supported by Canonical with software and security updates for 5 years, until 2023, but reaching end of life in April 2028.

As all Ubuntu LTS series, the Bionic Beaver will receive up to five point releases that bring a new installation medium with up-to-date components to make the deployment of the operating system less painful. The latest point release in the series being Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS, released on August 8th, 2019.

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Ubuntu-Based Linux For All Distro Gets New Release Powered by Linux Kernel 5.4

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

LFA (Linux For All) Build 191111 is now available to download based on Canonical's latest Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system, but shipping with a much newer kernel, namely Linux 5.4 RC6. As such, LFA is one of the first distros to adopt the upcoming Linux 5.4 kernel series.

LFA (Linux For All) Build 191111 is not just an update to previous releases of the Ubuntu-based GNU/Linux distribution, but a total rebuild that now uses packages from the latest Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) release instead of those used in the latest Ubuntu Linux release.

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Gnome: First Shortwave Beta

Filed under
GNOME

Earlier this year I announced Shortwave, the successor of Gradio. Now, almost 11 months later, I’m proud to announce the first public beta of Shortwave!

Shortwave is an internet radio player that lets you search for stations, listen to them and record songs automatically.

When a station is being played, everything gets automatically recorded in the background. You hear a song you like? No problem, you can save the song afterwards and play it with your favorite music player. Songs are automatically detected based on the stream metadata.

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Aldo: Shortwave Enters Beta As New GNOME Internet Radio Player

Pre-Loaded Linux PCs Continue Increasing - TUXEDO Computers Sets Up New Offices

Filed under
Linux

From System76 setting up their own manufacturing facility for Linux desktops to Dell offering more Linux laptop options, the demand for pre-loaded Linux PCs continues to increase. One of the smaller Linux PC vendors also now expanding is German-based TUXEDO Computers.

TUXEDO Computers shared that they are moving into new (and larger) offices in the lovely city of Augsburg, Germany. Up to now the company had been located in Königsbrunn, a quaint town in Bavaria, but now they are relocating to the town of Augsburg itself.

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The Voyager Linux Distro Offers an Interesting Spin on Xfce

Well, first things first: I’m not much of a distro hopper these days. I’m old and don’t like the hassle of reinstalling.

But I do like to keep an eye on what’s happening out there, in the wider Linux community, especially around Linux distros based on Ubuntu.

This year I’ve spotlighted Regolith Linux, Enso, Peppermint OS 10, and Zorin OS 15 (among others), all based and built on a solid Ubuntu foundation.

Earlier this week a reader (thanks Ricardo) suggested I take a look at Voyager Live, specifically the LTS release.

So what’s it like?

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Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye" Progress on Python 2 Removal

Filed under
Ubuntu

The removal of an older Python implementation from an entire operating system system and its software repositories is a major deal for any OS vendor as it raises many severity issues due to the fact that numerous packages have not been ported to a newer branch, in this case we're talking about the removal of Python 2 and its replacements with Python 3.

For Debian and Ubuntu, whose communities work closely together since the latter is based on the former, the transition from Python 2 to Python 3 started a few years ago, but now it's time for their next major release to ship without any Python 2 packages, though this appears to be a major deal even for some of the biggest GNU/Linux distributions in the world.

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KDE Frameworks 5.64.0 Open-Source Software Suite Released with over 200 Changes

Filed under
KDE

KDE Frameworks 5.64.0 brings more than 200 hundred changes to the open-source software suite used by the KDE Plasma Desktop environment and the KDE Applications software suite, in an attempt to improve the overall performance, stability, security and reliability of the KDE Plasma desktop and related apps.

Highlights of this release include initial support for the upcoming Qt 5.15 open-source and cross-platform application framework, support for CMake 3.5 series of the open-source and cross-platform package building tools, new and updated icons, as well as fixes for several memory leaks and crashes.

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Desktop Linux 101: Reinstall Your Favorite Apps With This Easy Automated Solution

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

My job – and sheer curiosity – compels me to distro hop a lot. You know, endlessly trying out new desktop Linux distributions to see what’s new and shiny, and learn stuff along the way. But I found myself repeatedly installing the same set of software after each “nuke and pave.” Along the way I discovered a solution that saves bunch of time: writing a simple bash script!

Basically it’s a text file that contains a series of commands that you can run as a program. It’s a great way to automate things that would otherwise get pretty tedious.

In my case, I have a ton of staple software I like to have (like Audacity, Kdenlive, Spotify, Discord, Telegram, Steam, OBS Studio) no matter what PC or Linux distribution I’m using. Sure, I could go to the software store and install them one by one, or batch install them in a Terminal windows, but let’s streamline the process!

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Stable kernels 5.3.10, 4.19.83, 4.14.153, 4.9.200, and 4.4.200

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.3.10

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.3.10 kernel.

    All users of the 5.3 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.3.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.3.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.19.83
  • Linux 4.14.153
  • Linux 4.9.200
  • Linux 4.4.200

Programming: Kirigami, Red Hat, Python and Twisted 19.10

Filed under
Development
  • Creating a Kirigami application, the easy way

    Interested in getting started with Kirigami development in a few minutes? Since version 5.63 of the Kirigami framework, there is an easy way to do so: an application template. The template facilitates the creation of a new application, using CMake as the build system, and linking to Kirigami dynamically as a plugin at runtime.

    Let’s see how it works. As a starting point, we will use a virtual environment running the latest KDE Neon User edition. This is by no means a requirement, any Linux distribution with Kirigami 5.63 or later perfectly fits our needs. KDE Neon has been chosen just because it provides -by design- the latest Qt, KDE frameworks and applications. Moreover, a virtual machine will let us play fearlessly with the system directories.

  • New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.13.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.13.0.Final for Eclipse 2019-09

    JBoss Tools 4.13.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.13 for Eclipse 2019-09 are here and waiting for you. In this article, I’ll cover the highlights of the new releases and show how to get started.

  • PyDev of the Week: Vuyisile Ndlovu

    This week we welcome Vuyisile Ndlovu (@terrameijar) as our PyDev of the Week! Vuyisile is a contributor to Real Python and a Python blogger on his own website. He is also active in the Python community in Africa. You can find out more about Vuyisile on his website or by checking out his Github profile. Let’s take some time to get to know him better!

    [...]

    I don’t have a favorite language yet because I haven’t been programming for a long time and I know that different languages are suited for different things. I’m learning JavaScript and back in college, I took C++ and Visual Basic classes. I teach programming classes at a High School using VB.Net because I find that using Visual Basic makes building GUIs in a Windows environment easy and the language is relatively simple to teach to beginners.

    The work projects I work on are web projects and I enjoy using Python and Django to build those out.

  • Twisted 19.10.0 Released

    On behalf of Twisted Matrix Laboratories, I am honoured to announce the release of Twisted 19.10!

    [...]

    Many thanks to everyone who had a part in this release - the supporters of the Twisted Software Foundation, the developers who contributed code as well as documentation, and all the people building great things with Twisted!

Games: Valve, BorderDoom, BlooM, The Sapling, Red Eclipse 2, Crash World, Cyberpunk Bar Sim and The Farlanders

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valve has an Armistice Sale and Singles Day sale on Steam with some good Linux games cheap

    Yet another chance to grab a game or two from your wishlist perhaps? The Armistice Sale on Steam supports the War Child UK charity and there's also a Singles Day sale.

    For the Armistice Sale, Valve are promoting games with non-violent gameplay (or they got an update for the sale) to support children affected by the world’s deadliest conflicts.

  • BorderDoom adds a little Borderlands flavour to classic Doom

    Always on the lookout for the new and interesting, BorderDoom came across the GOL news-desk recently adding a little Borderlands flavour to Doom.

    It's quite a basic mod, once that would likely work well with the many others out there. The basic idea of it is to add in weapons with random properties like damage, number of bullets fired, firing speed and so on, plus shields that recharge and enemies that have levels to give you more of a challenge.

  • BlooM brings together the classics Doom and Blood

    Another quality mashup here, with BlooM merging together elements from both Doom and Blood into something quite different. The team behind it recently put up a fresh demo while they work on the full release which includes new maps, enemies, music and more.

  • Design your own plants and animals in the casual sim The Sapling

    Releasing with Linux support in December, The Sapling looks like a nice casual sim where you design your own plants and animals.

    Probably one of the most difficult types of games to get right, many have attempted some sort of evolution sim and it's always great to see more.

  • Red Eclipse 2 is a revamp of the classic free arena shooter coming to Steam

    I will admit this is quite a surprise, Red Eclipse is a first-person shooter I haven't seen mentioned in a long time and it seems they're closing in on a big revamped release with Red Eclipse 2.

    A classic free and open source shooter, Red Eclipse hasn't seen a released update since 1.6 back in December of 2017. Two years later, they're launching the massive upgrade for it free on Steam. Not a simple update either, they've completely changed the rendering engine to bring in Tesseract so they can support more advanced graphical features.

  • Deliver pizzas, upgrade your car and smash into everything in Crash World

    Crash World is an upcoming comedy pizza delivery game with some really silly physics and you can try an early demo right now.

    Releasing on Steam next year, it's a pretty wacky game. Bouncy physics, terrible vehicle handling, a car you can upgrade and an ever-changing city should provide plenty of amusement. This isn't some GTA-style open-world game though, it's mission-based but going off-mission is something that will happen often. It did to me anyway, I just couldn't help myself.

  • Cyberpunk Bar Sim fully funded on Kickstarter and coming to Linux

    Currently crowdfunding (successfully!) with a few days left, Cyberpunk Bar Sim takes elements inspired by both Game Dev Tycoon and VA-11 Hall-A to create a new mix of cyberpunk bar ownership.

    Starting off with nothing but a small dive bar with five stools, a counter-top and a handful of customers you will need to grow the business and expand your reach. Eventually you will pull in regulars, who will get chatty and tell you their story.

  • Build a busy city on Mars in The Farlanders, an in-development city-builder with a free web demo

    Currently in development and quite early on, The Farlanders is a tile-based city-builder set on the red planet Mars. Created by developer Angry Kid, the same behind Undervault a free roguelike dungeon crawler.

    Even though it's not finished, it's starting to really look good and it's already engrossing enough for me to recommend taking a look at it if you're in the mood for a city-builder that's a little different to the rest.

If Your Ubuntu 19.10 Or GNOME-Based Installation Keeps Locking Up, You’re Not Alone

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Carl Richell, CEO of System76, sent me a message this morning that only reinforces why I appreciate that company: they’re nimble and they act as quickly as humanly possible. Here’s what Richell had to say: “We pushed updates to Mutter Friday morning and users have reported that it resolved the issue for them. The same updates will be in Ubuntu soon as well.”

I can happily confirm that installing the latest update on my Oryx Pro running Pop!_OS 19.10 resolved the issue, so a solution is definitely headed your way.

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Also: Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Continuing To Work On Python 2 Removal

Fedora 31 and Control Group v2

Filed under
Red Hat

Over the last few years, I have seen the Linux kernel team working on Control Group (cgroup) v2, adding new features and fixing lots of issues with cgroup v1. The kernel team announced that cgroup v2 was stable back in 2016.

Last year at the All Systems Go conference, I met a lot of the engineers who are working on cgroup v2, most of them from Facebook, as well as the systemd team. We talked about the issues and problems with cgroup v1 and the deep desire to get Linux distributions to use cgroup v2 by default. The last few versions of Fedora have supported cgroup v2, but it was not enabled as the default. Almost no one will modify the defaults for something as fundamental as the default resource-constraint system in Fedora, causing cgroup v2 to languish in obscurity.

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Also: Linking Linux system automation to the bottom line

Interview with Bryan Wong

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

There are a lot of features that make me love Krita.

First, a lot of those features are very useful for game arts, such as clones array, grid and guide, these make making tiles extremely smooth. I can also make a bunch of clone layers with transform mask to generate spritesheets easily.

Second, the brush engine is powerful. It has masked brush and texture. The soft round brush also allows you to draw your own intensity curve to make an interesting result.

Third, the developer support is excellent. Whenever I report a bug, the developer will respond quickly and will solve the problem. The team really cares about the program and user experience.

And many more…

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Cheat sheet for common Linux commands

Filed under
Linux

The terminal is one of the most efficient ways to interact with a Linux computer. When you type a command into the shell, you tell your computer exactly what you want it to do, specifying both the source and destination of what you need done, and then there's no further interaction required. Every time you type a valid command into a shell, you're essentially programming, even though your program may only run for a millisecond.

Graphical interfaces have one perceived advantage, though: they encourage meandering. You can sit in front of a computer GUI and explore aimlessly until you stumble upon something productive to do. With a Linux terminal, you have to know what command to use before you can explore. Having a cheat sheet with the most common commands can be both relieving and empowering.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Articles at LWN (Paywall Just Expired)

  • Filesystem sandboxing with eBPF

    Bijlani is focused on a specific type of sandbox: a filesystem sandbox. The idea is to restrict access to sensitive data when running these untrusted programs. The rules would need to be dynamic as the restrictions might need to change based on the program being run. Some examples he gave were to restrict access to the ~/.ssh/id_rsa* files or to only allow access to files of a specific type (e.g. only *.pdf for a PDF reader). He went through some of the existing solutions to show why they did not solve his problem, comparing them on five attributes: allowing dynamic policies, usable by unprivileged users, providing fine-grained control, meeting the security needs for running untrusted code, and avoiding excessive performance overhead. Unix discretionary access control (DAC)—file permissions, essentially—is available to unprivileged users, but fails most of the other measures. Most importantly, it does not suffice to keep untrusted code from accessing files owned by the user running the code. SELinux mandatory access control (MAC) does check most of the boxes (as can be seen in the talk slides [PDF]), but is not available to unprivileged users. Namespaces (or chroot()) can be used to isolate filesystems and parts of filesystems, but cannot enforce security policies, he said. Using LD_PRELOAD to intercept calls to filesystem operations (e.g. open() or write()) is a way for unprivileged users to enforce dynamic policies, but it can be bypassed fairly easily. System calls can be invoked directly, rather than going through the library calls, or files can be mapped with mmap(), which will allow I/O to the files without making system calls. Similarly, ptrace() can be used, but it suffers from time-of-check-to-time-of-use (TOCTTOU) races, which would allow the security protections to be bypassed.

  • Generalizing address-space isolation

    Linux systems have traditionally run with a single address space that is shared by user and kernel space. That changed with the advent of the Meltdown vulnerability, which forced the merging of kernel page-table isolation (KPTI) at the end of 2017. But, Mike Rapoport said during his 2019 Open Source Summit Europe talk, that may not be the end of the story for address-space isolation. There is a good case to be made for increasing the separation of address spaces, but implementing that may require some fundamental changes in how kernel memory management works. Currently, Linux systems still use a single address space, at least when they are running in kernel mode. It is efficient and convenient to have everything visible, but there are security benefits to be had from splitting the address space apart. Memory that is not actually mapped is a lot harder for an attacker to get at. The first step in that direction was KPTI. It has performance costs, especially around transitions between user and kernel space, but there was no other option that would address the Meltdown problem. For many, that's all the address-space isolation they would like to see, but that hasn't stopped Rapoport from working to expand its use.

  • Identifying buggy patches with machine learning

    The stable kernel releases are meant to contain as many important fixes as possible; to that end, the stable maintainers have been making use of a machine-learning system to identify patches that should be considered for a stable update. This exercise has had some success but, at the 2019 Open Source Summit Europe, Sasha Levin asked whether this process could be improved further. Might it be possible for a machine-learning system to identify patches that create bugs and intercept them, so that the fixes never become necessary? Any kernel patch that fixes a bug, Levin began, should include a tag marking it for the stable updates. Relying on that tag turns out to miss a lot of important fixes, though. About 3-4% of the mainline patch stream was being marked, but the number of patches that should be put into the stable releases is closer to 20% of the total. Rather than try to get developers to mark more patches, he developed his machine-learning system to identify fixes in the mainline patch stream automatically and queue them for manual review. This system uses a number of heuristics, he said. If the changelog contains language like "fixes" or "causes a panic", it's likely to be an important fix. Shorter patches tend to be candidates.

  • Next steps for kernel workflow improvement

    The kernel project's email-based development process is well established and has some strong defenders, but it is also showing its age. At the 2019 Kernel Maintainers Summit, it became clear that the kernel's processes are much in need of updating, and that the maintainers are beginning to understand that. It is one thing, though, to establish goals for an improved process; it is another to actually implement that process and convince developers to use it. At the 2019 Open Source Summit Europe, a group of 20 or so maintainers and developers met in the corner of a noisy exhibition hall to try to work out what some of the first steps in that direction might be. The meeting was organized and led by Konstantin Ryabitsev, who is in charge of kernel.org (among other responsibilities) at the Linux Foundation (LF). Developing the kernel by emailing patches is suboptimal, he said, especially when it comes to dovetailing with continuous-integration (CI) processes, but it still works well for many kernel developers. Any new processes will have to coexist with the old, or they will not be adopted. There are, it seems, some resources at the LF that can be directed toward improving the kernel's development processes, especially if it is clear that this work is something that the community wants.

Server Leftovers

  • Knative at 1: New Changes, New Opportunities

    This summer marked the one-year anniversary of Knative, an open-source project that provides the fundamental building blocks for serverless workloads in Kubernetes. In its relatively short life (so far), Knative is already delivering on its promise to boost organizations’ ability to leverage serverless and FaaS (functions as a service). Knative isn’t the only serverless offering for Kubernetes, but it has become a de-facto standard because it arguably has a richer set of features and can be integrated more smoothly than the competition. And the Knative project continues to evolve to address businesses’ changing needs. In the last year alone, the platform has seen many improvements, giving organizations looking to expand their use of Kubernetes through serverless new choices, new considerations and new opportunities.

  • Redis Labs Leverages Kubernetes to Automate Database Recovery

    Redis Labs today announced it has enhanced the Operator software for deploying its database on Kubernetes clusters to include an automatic cluster recovery that enables customers to manage a stateful service as if it were stateless. Announced at Redis Day, the latest version of Kubernetes Operator for Redis Enterprise makes it possible to spin up a new instance of a Redis database in minutes. Howard Ting, chief marketing officer for Redis Labs, says as Kubernetes has continued to gain traction, it became apparent that IT organizations need tools to provision Redis Enterprise for Kubernetes clusters. That requirement led Redis Labs to embrace Operator software for Kubernetes developed by CoreOS, which has since been acquired by Red Hat. IT teams can either opt to recover databases manually using Kubernetes Operator or configure the tool to recover databases automatically anytime a database goes offline. In either case, he says, all datasets are loaded and balanced across the cluster without any need for manual workflows.

  • Dare to Transform IT with SUSE Global Services

Audiocasts/Shows: FLOSS Weekly and Linux Headlines

  • FLOSS Weekly 555: Emissions API

    Emissions API is easy to access satellite-based emission data for everyone. The project strives to create an application interface that lowers the barrier to use the data for visualization and/or analysis.

  • 2019-11-13 | Linux Headlines

    It’s time to update your kernel again as yet more Intel security issues come to light, good news for container management and self-hosted collaboration, and Brave is finally ready for production.

Bill Wear, Developer Advocate for MAAS: foo.c

I remember my first foo. It was September, 1974, on a PDP-11/40, in the second-floor lab at the local community college. It was an amazing experience for a fourteen-year-old, admitted at 12 to audit night classes because his dad was a part-time instructor and full-time polymath. I should warn you, I’m not the genius in the room. I maintained a B average in math and electrical engineering, but A+ averages in English, languages, programming, and organic chemistry (yeah, about that….). The genius was my Dad, the math wizard, the US Navy CIC Officer. More on him in a later blog — he’s relevant to what MAAS does in a big way. Okay, so I’m more of a language (and logic) guy. But isn’t code where math meets language and logic? Research Unix Fifth edition UNIX had just been licensed to educational institutions at no cost, and since this college was situated squarely in the middle of the military-industrial complex, scoring a Hulking Giant was easy. Finding good code to run it? That was another issue, until Bell Labs offered up a freebie. It was amazing! Getting the computer to do things on its own — via ASM and FORTRAN — was not new to me. What was new was the simplicity of the whole thing. Mathematically, UNIX and C were incredibly complex, incorporating all kinds of network theory and topology and numerical methods that (frankly) haven’t always been my favorite cup of tea. I’m not even sure if Computer Science was a thing yet. But the amazing part? Here was an OS which took all that complexity and translated it to simple logic: everything is a file; small is beautiful; do one thing well. Didn’t matter that it was cranky and buggy and sometimes dumped your perfectly-okay program in the bit bucket. It was a thrill to be able to do something without having to obsess over the math underneath. Read more Also: How to upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04 Daily Builds from Ubuntu 19.10