Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 20 Apr 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 07/04/2014 - 11:10am
Story Windows XP Dies Tomorrow, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Launches Next Week Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2014 - 10:57am
Story Is Android good enough to be a laptop OS? Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2014 - 10:51am
Story F2FS File-System Gains Large Directory Support, More Tuning Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2014 - 8:48am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 07/04/2014 - 8:47am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 07/04/2014 - 8:42am
Story New Google Chrome 35 Lands with Small Fixes for Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2014 - 8:39am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 07/04/2014 - 8:37am
Story A council of hope – the free software column Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2014 - 8:26am
Story iPhone becomes victim of Android’s success, makes Apple worry Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2014 - 4:17am

The Great 'Race to Linux'

Filed under
Linux

How long does it take a .NET developer to write a Linux application? The Race to Linux project aims to find out.

Slackware 10.2

Filed under
Reviews
Slack
-s

It's no secret that Slackware 10.2 was released yesterday. This was big news and headlined many sites as well as being announced on DistroWatch with the links to download torrents. Slackware puts out a new release once or maybe twice a year if the community is lucky, so when they do release a new version, it's big news. I, like many of you, have been on pins and needles for several weeks now since hints of a impending new release leaked out. Then anticipation grew when the changelog of last week made the press announcing 10.2 was almost ready and should be out maybe by Tuesday. Torrents were made public yesterday and I grabbed my place in line. Excitement overwhelmed me as I booted the install disk. I was not disappointed in what I found.

Open source can help newsrooms

Filed under
OSS

Open Source Content Management Systems (CMS) could be the answer to streamline African newsrooms," says Douglas Aranelles, the Head of Research and Development for the Media Development Loan Fund's Center for Advanced Media.

Book Review: Perl Best Practices

Filed under
Software

Perl and its supporters are known for working in whatever way suits them, but that can make for unnecessarily complex and confusing code. Here's a book, though, that dares to say \"enough\".

Did Google Score a Win Against M$?

Filed under
Legal

Both companies claimed victory, after a judge ruled this week that a former top Microsoft engineer could do work for Google. But the search giant may be the real winner.

Aaron Seigo Interviewed on TLLTS Podcast

Filed under
KDE

Last night KDE developer Aaron Seigo was interviewed on the live weekly Podcast The Linux Link Tech Show. Episode 101 is now available for download.

Time Warner, M$ in talks on AOL

Filed under
Microsoft

Time Warner Inc. and Microsoft Corp. are discussing cooperation between their Internet search and advertising networks, a source familiar with the matter said on Thursday.

Linux talent scarce as penguins' teeth

Filed under
Linux

Liquid Computing software architect Ron Van Holst, software designer Sean Liu, and team leader Brent Webster waddle out a flock of 40 plastic penguins to draw attention to the company's drive to find new Linux software developers.

Open Source Code in M$ Product

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft plans to include the Message Passing Interface-a library specification for message passing proposed as a standard by a broad-based committee of vendors, implementers and users-in its Windows Server 2003 Compute Cluster Edition.

Games watchdog warns over content

Filed under
Gaming

Games publishers in the US have been told by the industry's watchdog that they must declare any hidden content in games released since September 2004.

First code release for Debian consortium

Filed under
Linux

A consortium of Linux vendors created to promote the commercial use of the Debian GNU/Linux distribution has released its first product, and plans more.

Getting serious about the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Novell's Jack Messman thinks Microsoft Vista is going to be so expensive that it's going to make users think hard about switching to Linux instead.

You know something? He's right.

MDV 2006 RC2 - In the Homestretch?

Filed under
MDV
Reviews
-s

As we continue our coverage of the Mandriva 2006 development cycle, this time we test the upgrade procedure. In addition we also test the newer "isos on the disk" install method. Introduced last release (10.2/2005) this newest install feature is quite exciting. It didn't function in one of the first betas, but does it work this time? And how did the upgrade go? Did all my data get lost? Am I plagued with crashes and lost configurations? And was anything new to behold?

OSCSL gives Ubuntu to combat piracy

Filed under
Linux

More people are now considering open source technology as an option to proprietary software, according to a consultant of the Open Source Computer Security Laboratory (OSCSL).

How To Configure E 16.7.x

Filed under
Software

This file documents Enlightenment 16.7.x configuration file information. How To edit the config files used by Enlightenment, such as Menu files, configuration and layout of menus, how to configure applications Group...

First Look: VIA's C7 Platform

Filed under
Hardware

VIA is beginning to ramp up production on the successors to their C3 part, the C7 and C7-M CPU's. Keith Kowal, marketing manager for VIA's chipset platform group, took some time on his promotional tour to talk with us about the new platform.

Samba's Terpstra shoots down open source misinformation

Filed under
OSS

In this interview, Terpstra shoots down some pernicious misunderstandings about Linux and open source and explains how IT organizations often end up shunning their IT planning duties.

Also: Poor planning slow Windows-to-Linux desktop migrations.

HP slams brakes on Formula 1 sponsorship

Filed under
Hardware

In the midst of further financial difficulties, HP announced today that it is ending its sponsorship of the BMW Williams F1 team at the end of the 2005 racing season.

Should Open Source Applications Run On Windows?

Filed under
OSS

I was interested in posing questions on this topic to various people that work with, contribute to, or provide customer support and consulting for Open Source applications that run on Windows and Linux.

Open Source Software Moving Onto Corporate Desktops

Filed under
OSS

Open-source software, once primarily associated with computer operating systems, is now being used by companies for critical functions and software applications such as storing data, managing customers and analyzing business information.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Programming: imapautofiler, Red Hat Decision Manager, AiC, Python-moa, WebAssembly/Python

  • imapautofiler 1.8.0
    imapautofiler applies user-defined rules to automatically organize messages on an IMAP server.
  • Modern business logic tooling workshop, lab 3: Create a domain model
    Since starting to update my free online rules and process automation workshops that showcase how to get started using modern business logic tooling, we’ve come a long way with process automation. The updates started with moving from JBoss BPM to Red Hat Decision Manager and from JBoss BPM Suite to Red Hat Process Automation Manager. The first lab update showed how to install Red Hat Decision Manager on your laptop, and the second lab showed how to create a new project. This article highlights the newest lab update for Red Hat Process Automation Manager, where you’ll learn how to create a domain model.
  • AiC: Adventures in consensus
    In the talk I gave at Rust LATAM, I said that the Rust project has always emphasized finding the best solution, rather than winning the argument. I think this is one of our deepest values. It’s also one of the hardest for us to uphold. Let’s face it – when you’re having a conversation, it’s easy to get attached to specific proposals. It’s easy to have those proposals change from “Option A” vs “Option B” to “my option” and “their option”. Once this happens, it can be very hard to let them “win” – even if you know that both options are quite reasonable. This is a problem I’ve been thinking a lot about lately. So I wanted to start an irregular series of blog posts entitled “Adventures in consensus”, or AiC for short. These posts are my way of exploring the topic, and hopefully getting some feedback from all of you while I’m at it. This first post dives into what a phrase like “finding the best solution” even means (is there a best?) as well as the mechanics of how one might go about deciding if you really have the “best” solution. Along the way, we’ll see a few places where I think our current process could do better.
  • Quansight Labs Blog: MOA: a theory for composable and verifiable tensor computations
    Python-moa (mathematics of arrays) is an approach to a high level tensor compiler that is based on the work of Lenore Mullins and her dissertation. A high level compiler is necessary because there are many optimizations that a low level compiler such as gcc will miss. It is trying to solve many of the same problems as other technologies such as the taco compiler and the xla compiler. However, it takes a much different approach than others guided by the following principles.
  • The Human in Devops
    This week a mild epiphany came to me right after a somewhat heated and tense meeting with a team of developers plus project owner of a web project. They were angry and they were not afraid to show it. They were somewhat miffed about the fact that the head wrote them an email pretty much forcing them to participate to make our DevOps initiative a success. All kinds of expletive words were running through my head in relation to describing this team of flabby, tired looking individuals in front of me, which belied the cool demeanour and composure that I was trying so hard to maintain. It happened. In the spur of the moment I too got engulfed in a sea of negativity and for a few minutes lost site of what is the most important component or pillar in a successful DevOps initiative. The people. "What a bunch of mule heads !" I thought. It's as plain as day, once this initiative is a success everybody can go home earlier and everything will be more predictable and we can do much much more than we could before. "Why are you fighting this ?!" I was ready to throw my hands up in defeat when it finally dawned on me.
  • Python Bytes: #126 WebAssembly comes to Python

Graphics: AMDGPU and X.Org Elections

  • amdgpu drm-next-5.2
  • AMDGPU Has Another Round Of Updates Ahead Of Linux 5.2
    Feature work on DRM-Next for the Linux 5.2 kernel cycle is winding down while today AMD has sent in what could be their last round of AMDGPU feature updates for this next kernel release. Building off their earlier Linux 5.2 feature work are more updates. That earlier round brought new SMU11 enablement code for Vega 20, various other Vega 20 features, HMM preparations, and other code changes.
  • 2019 Election Round 2 voting OPEN
    To all X.Org Foundation Members: The round 2 of X.Org Foundation's annual election is now open and will remain open until 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. Four of the eight director seats are open during this election, with the four nominees receiving the highest vote totals serving as directors for two year terms. There were six candidates nominated. For a complete list of the candidates and their personal statements, please visit the 2019 X.Org Elections page at https://www.x.org/wiki/BoardOfDirectors/Elections/2019/ The new bylaw changes were approved in the first round of voting. Here are some instructions on how to cast your vote: Login to the membership system at: https://members.x.org/ If you do not remember your password, you can click on the "lost password" button and enter your user name. An e-mail will be sent to you with your password. If you have problems with the membership system, please e-mail membership at x.org. When you login you will see an "Active Ballots" section with the "X.Org 2019 Elections Round 2" ballot. When you click on that you will be presented with a page describing the ballot. At the bottom you will find a number of dropdowns that let you rank your candidates by order of preference. For the election: There is a pull-down selection box for 1st choice, 2nd, choice, and so on. Pick your candidates top to bottom in order of preference, avoiding duplicates. After you have completed your ballot, click the "Cast vote" button. Note that once you click this button, your votes will be cast and you will not be able to make further changes, so please make sure you are satisfied with your votes before clicking the "Cast vote" button. After you click the "Vote" button, the system will verify that you have completed a valid ballot. If your ballot is invalid (e.g., you duplicated a selection or did not answer the By-laws approval question), it will return you to the previous voting page. If your ballot is valid, your votes will be recorded and the system will show you a notice that your votes were cast. Note that the election will close at 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. At that time, the election committee will count the votes and present the results to the current board for validation. After the current board validates the results, the election committee will present the results to the Members. Harry, on behalf of the X.Org elections committee
  • It's Time To Re-Vote Following The Botched 2019 X.Org Elections
    While there were the recent X.Org Foundation board elections, a do-over was needed as their new custom-written voting software wasn't properly recording votes... So here's now your reminder to re-vote in these X.Org elections. At least with the initial round of voting they reached a super majority and the ballot question of whether the X.Org Foundation should formally fold FreeDesktop.org into its umbrella worked and that X.Org + FreeDesktop.org hook-up passed so all is well on that front. But for the Board of Directors elections, that's where re-voting is needed with the voting software that now correctly records the votes.

today's howtos

Games: Lutris and More

  • Epic Games Store Now On Linux Thanks To Lutris
    While the Epic Games Store itself is not officially supported by the open source Linux operating system, a third-party gaming client has now made sure that you can access the store and launcher on your own distro. The Epic Games Store is now accessible on Linux via the Lutris Gaming client. The client is available to all Linux users, who in the past has provided the same users a way to play PC games without the need to have Windows installed in their machines. Although Linux is not necessarily the go-to platform when it comes to PC gaming, there is a very niche audience dedicated to making the platform work in favor of open-source and to counteract what could be perceived as a heavily Windows-biased PC gaming community. Linux gaming is somewhat tedious to the relatively casual or normal user, although there are some within the Linux community that advertise and try to foster its growth in terms of gaming, as there are some games that can run better on the operating system. That is to say, if you have a lot of patience to try and make it work.
  • You Died but a Necromancer revived you is good fun in a small package
    Sometimes, simplicity is what makes a game and in the case of You Died BaNRY that's very true. The game has little depth to it but makes up for that in just how frantic and fun it can be. The entire gameplay is just you (or you and friends) attempting to cross a small level filled with platforms, spikes and all sorts of crazy traps. It's ridiculously easy to get into as well, since the controls are so basic all you need to worry about is your movement.
  • Forager is a weirdly addictive casual grinding game that has mined into my heart
    I'm not usually one for games that have you endlessly wander around, collect resources, build a little and repeat but Forager is so ridiculously charming it's lovely.
  • DragonRuby Game Toolkit, a cross-platform way to make games with Ruby
    Now for something a little different! Ryan "Icculus" Gordon, a name known for many Linux ports and SDL2 teamed up with indie developer Amir Rajan to create a new cross-platform toolkit. Why was it created? Well, in a nutshell they both "hate the complexity of today's engines" and this toolkit was actually made to help ship A Dark Room for the Nintendo Switch, which shows how versatile it is.