Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 23 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Book Review: Hardening Linux

Filed under
Reviews

Linux enjoys a large space in the server arena. It is favoured as a server over the competition by many for its robustness, stability and also its cost advantage. But now a days, it has also widely found favour as a desktop replacement for windows. But as with any OS, it is imperative to take necessary steps to make Linux more secure. This book titled - Hardening Linux - by James Turnbull concentrates on this very important topic of securing your Linux machine.

LinuxWorld 2006: A Diamond in The Rough

Filed under
Linux

"What do you think of the show?" This is the question I heard all week at LinuxWorld here. It turns out that many of my journalist peers, a few speakers and a number of vendors weren't as impressed by the show as I was.

Linux a BIG hit in India

Filed under
Linux

It has been over a year since UTI Bank set up its call center that handles over 7,000 calls per day. The bank was looking for a robust platform that could guarantee it "high availability of services and uninterrupted call traffic". It had options but finally decided on Linux for its core business applications. "Today, we are really happy with Linux that has delivered 99.99 per cent uptime so far."

How System Calls Work in Linux?

Filed under
HowTos

Every GNU/Linux programmer here reading this article must have used system calls to code their programs. GNU/Linux programming is incomplete without system calls. System calls are initiated by software interrupts. Before we delve into that, however, let’s define system calls.

Only 'freaks' waste their time with Linux in Oklahoma

Filed under
Linux

For the last two weeks, the Linux army has seized on Tuttle, Oklahoma city manager Jerry Taylor as a symbol of all that's wrong with the world. This man attacked Linux maker CentOS without cause, threatened to call the FBI on the firm and refused to apologize for these actions even after learning the error of his ways. Typical Microsoft-loving, bureaucrat thinking, right?

n/a

LinuxWorld: What not to do when eyeing open-source software

Filed under
Linux

When considering a migration to open-source software, IT users should keep in mind the mistakes of those who tried before and avoid falling into the same traps experienced by others.

LinuxWorld: Maintaining the impact of open source applications

Maria Winslow, author of The Practical Manager's Guide to Open Source and open source business analyst for Open Source Migrations, sat down at LinuxWorld Conference & Expo in Boston with SearchOpenSource.com. She talked about her views on emerging technologies, where not to find deployable open source applications and the impact of proprietary vendors that decide to share their code with the community.

n/a

Access Linux Platform Shown at LinuxWorld

Filed under
Linux

Access Linux Platform from PalmSourcePalmSource is exhibiting at the LinuxWorld conference going on this week in Boston. PalmInfocenter is live on the scene to bring you this exclusive new preview of the Access Linux Platform.

New Nvidia Graphic Drivers: Version: 1.0-8756

Filed under
Software

Linux IA32 & AMD64/EM64T
Latest Version: 1.0-8756

Highlights:

# Adds support for GeForce 7300, GeForce 7400 Go, GeForce 7600 and GeForce 7900 GPUs.
# Added support for running OpenGL applications while the Composite X extension is enabled; see "The X Composite Extension" appendix for details.

New PoC malware can infect both Windows and Linux

Filed under
Security

Kaspersky Lab today reported a new proof-of-concept (PoC) cross-platform virus that creates malicious code to infect both Linux and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

Norway Looks to Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Norway said Friday that it plans to wean itself from dependence on large corporations like Microsoft by increasing the use of open source software within government agencies. The Norwegian government also plans to organize a panel of experts to set standards for access to public information and how operating systems can interoperate.

Ubuntu: First Time User's Experience

Filed under
Ubuntu

I’ve started this blog to document my struggles and victories with the world of linux. As I said this is my first real linux experience, I installed fedora core once before about 2 years ago and that lasted all of 3 hours before I got rid.

Penguin Pete's XWM Guide

Filed under
Software

Newcomers to Linux and other FOSS systems have a new phenomena to digest. As opposed to proprietary operating systems, FOSS operating systems give you your choice of desktop environments and window managers. This is a brief overview of the various interfaces you may run on top of the X graphical desktop.

Carmony dispels Linspire Linux myths

Filed under
Linux

Chances are that you think Linspire lets you run Windows applications, that you have to run it as root, and that it's really not quite a proper Linux. Wrong, wrong, and wrong. At LinuxWorld in Boston this week, CEO Kevin Carmony explained what Linspire Linux is, and isn't all about.

Open or closed? The ODF debate spills into LinuxWorld

Filed under
OSS

The debate surrounding OpenDocument and open file standards over the past year has resulted in a rollercoaster ride of events, but oftentimes a simple question can be overlooked as advocates of open standards battle Microsoft for the fate of the office application suite.

n/a

Kororaa XGL - Part 0.2: The Harddrive Installer

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

"If wishes were horses, then dreamers would ride." I've heard those bars of music in my head more times than I can count during my life. So many times, that's the only possible response if you set your dreams on pots of gold or handsome princes on massive white steeds. However, if your wishes are more realistic, they sometimes come true. Such is the case today when Kororaa released version 0.2 of their wonderful XGL Livecd. In my original article I wished for a hard drive installer more than once. Today my wish was granted. As a Part 2 to that introductory story, today we test that hard drive installer and the performance of the installed system on my sparkling new tuxmachine. These are the results.

AT&T Forwards ALL Internet Traffic Into NSA Says EFF

Filed under
Security

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) on Wednesday filed the legal briefs and evidence supporting its motion for a preliminary injunction in its class-action lawsuit against AT&T. The evidence that we are filing supports our claim that AT&T is diverting Internet traffic into the hands of the NSA wholesale, in violation of federal wiretapping laws and the Fourth Amendment.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Accelerating the journey to open hybrid cloud with Red Hat Modernization and Migration Solutions

    The integration of technology into all areas of a business (the "digital transformation" we hear so much about) is fundamentally changing how organizations operate as well as how they deliver value to customers. An example is Lockheed Martin, who opted to undergo an eight-week agile transformation labs residency to implement an open source architecture onboard the F-22 and simultaneously disentangle its web of embedded systems. But such transformation can also create new challenges, from additional competitive pressures to increased customer expectations. To help overcome these challenges, Red Hat is introducing a family of solutions to help optimize infrastructure, modernize applications and accelerate innovation while supporting customers in their journey to the open hybrid cloud. Red Hat Modernization and Migration Solutions are designed to help customers realize the benefits of open technologies and adopt containers, Kubernetes and hybrid cloud-ready platforms. The family of solutions offers a path for customers from restrictive, proprietary environments to more flexible and (often) less costly open source alternatives, in an iterative approach.

  • Let’s talk about Privacy by Design

    Privacy by Design or Privacy by Default (PbD) is not a new concept. However PbD received renewed attention when the GDPR added PbD as a legal requirement. PbD refers to the process of building in technical, organizational and security measures at the beginning stage of product development and throughout the product lifecycle. [...] One PbD tool we use to build in privacy to our development process is our Privacy Impact Assessment, also known as a PIA. The PIA is a process which assists developers at the early stages in identifying and mitigating privacy risks associated with the collection and use of personal data. The PIA tool begins with a self assessment that asks a lot of questions about the planned project or product. This initiates a process of review by individuals trained in privacy and security. The process is collaborative and creates an on-going dialogue about privacy with respect to the product, system or application at hand.

  • IBM Open Sources Its Workhorse Power Chip Architecture

    RISC-V now has formidable competition from an architecture with a long track record in servers and supercomputers.

Simplicity Linux 19.10 Alpha ISOs are here!

We’re proud to announce the release of Simplicity Linux 19.10. It is based on Stretchdog, which in turn is based on Debian Stretch. As this is an alpha release, none of these images should be considered finished versions, and may contain bugs or issues which won’t be present in the final release. These images should also be considered to be designed for live booting rather than being installed. All three editions of Simplicity Linux 19.10 feature Ecosia as the default search engine. This is a search engine where revenue from ads is used to plant trees. It is something we have been testing for some time, and we weren’t going to include it in the alpha releases. However, after hearing about the fires in the Amazon Rainforest, we have decided to include Ecosia in each version. It’s our way of trying to help in whatever small way we can. Simplicity Mini 19.10 Alpha is our cut down version of Simplicity Linux. There are few local applications, instead being replaced by browser based versions of software which are run through Google Chrome. comes with Google Docs, Gmail, Netflix, Vortex Cloud Gaming, Spotify, Mega.nz, Vivaldi browser which opens on boot, Lastpass password manager, DotVPN, uBlock Origin. Read more

Programming Leftovers

  • Animating Ptolemy’s Equant with Python, SVG, and CSS

    You will recall my previous blog post that tried to build the necessary scaffolding for me to finally write up my 2017 PyCon Ireland keynote on the structure of the Medieval universe. It ran into several problems with matplotlib animations — but, having written that post, I realized that the problem ran deeper. How could any animation show a Solar System, when a Solar System’s motion never exactly repeats? The orbital periods of the planets aren’t exact multiples of each other, and don’t provide a moment when the planets reach their original positions and the animation can start over again. At whatever moment an animation finished and looped back to the beginning, the planets would visibly and jarringly jump back to their original position.

  • Train your own spell corrector with TextBlob

    TextBlob is a wonderful Python library it. It wraps nltk with a really pleasant API. Out of the box, you get a spell-corrector.

  • How To Learn Any Programming Language Online in 2019

    Let’s face it, computers are everywhere these days, and the need for programmers is ever-increasing. Programming is vital to make computers be able to help us solve our everyday problems. It’s also a means to increase their speed and usability. With this in mind, it’s high time you jumped on this bandwagon and learned a language yourself! However, picking out the most appropriate programming language to learn is a substantial task for beginners. A good approach to making this choice is to consider the most popular programming languages, which languages are easy-to-learn, and how easy it is to find a job for beginners in these languages.

  • How to Build a Custom Anaconda Installer for R

    A frequent question on the Anaconda Community mailing list is how to package R with conda for distribution. Depending on the use case, one option may be to use conda to move environments. This requires that conda has been previously installed on the system. Another option is conda constructor, a utility for packaging a complete conda installation with Python and R packages. Constructor is the same utility we use to build Anaconda Distribution and Miniconda installers. It’s a multi-platform installer which means you can build an installer for Windows, Linux and macOS. It also supports a number of options to control how the installer is built. These options are documented on the GitHub constructor repository.

  • Digging into regressions

    Whenever a patch is landed on autoland, it will run many builds and tests to make sure there are no regressions. Unfortunately many times we find a regression and 99% of the time backout the changes so they can be fixed. This work is done by the Sheriff team at Mozilla- they monitor the trees and when something is wrong, they work to fix it (sometimes by a quick fix, usually by a backout). A quick fact, there were 1228 regressions in H1 (January-June) 2019. My goal in writing is not to recommend change, but instead to start conversations and figure out what data we should be collecting in order to have data driven discussions. Only then would I expect that recommendations for changes would come forth.

  • “Sudo Mastery” and the new Tilted Windmill Press clothing line

    Sudo Mastery, 2nd edition, is now complete. I’m doing the release slightly different this time, however.

  • Fossil Versus Git

    The feature sets of Fossil and Git overlap in many ways. Both are distributed version control systems which store a tree of check-in objects to a local repository clone. In both systems, the local clone starts out as a full copy of the remote parent. New content gets added to the local clone and then later optionally pushed up to the remote, and changes to the remote can be pulled down to the local clone at will. Both systems offer diffing, patching, branching, merging, cherry-picking, bisecting, private branches, a stash, etc.

weston 7.0.0

Weston 7.0.0 is released!

ABI note: the return value of two functions introduced in this release
has been changed from void to int: weston_log_scope_printf and
weston_log_scope_vprintf. Additionally weston_binding_destroy has been
made public again.

Daniel Stone (1):
      backend-drm: Enforce content protection for hardware planes

Manuel Stoeckl (1):
      weston-terminal: Ignore SIGPIPE

Marius Vlad (2):
      weston-log: Return bytes written for 'printf()' and 'vprintf()' functions
      compositor: Return the number of bytes written as to format properly

Simon Ser (1):
      build: bump to version 7.0.0 for the official release

sichem (1):
      make weston_binding_destroy public

git tag: 7.0.0
Read more Also: Wayland's Weston 7.0 Compositor Released With PipeWire Streaming Support