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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 21 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu With Linux 3.16 Smashes OS X 10.9.4 On The MacBook Air Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2014 - 4:20pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2014 - 10:40am
Story Red Hat CEO Whitehurst on VMware, OpenStack and CentOS Rianne Schestowitz 14/07/2014 - 10:34am
Story Ubuntu 14.04: Is Canonical taking on too much? Rianne Schestowitz 14/07/2014 - 10:28am
Story The Road Ahead Rianne Schestowitz 14/07/2014 - 10:24am
Story Canonical and Ubuntu Helped Munich Save Millions of Dollars by Ditching Microsoft Products Rianne Schestowitz 14/07/2014 - 10:14am
Story Raspberry Pi Model B+ Rianne Schestowitz 14/07/2014 - 9:26am
Story LFTP 4.5.3 File Transfer Software Is for People Who Love the Terminal Rianne Schestowitz 14/07/2014 - 9:16am
Story Open Source boost as Linux Conference heads to Auckland Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2014 - 7:15am
Story This Is What It's Like To Be A Woman CEO In The Male-Dominated Open-Source Software World Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2014 - 7:10am

VMware goes to free with Server product

Filed under
Software

As anticipated, VMware has created a free version of its server partitioning software in the hopes of drawing new customers to its technology. In addition, the move counters open source rival XenSource, which gives away core server virtualization technology known as a hypervisor.

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Getting your caffeine buzz started in the shower

Filed under
Misc
Humor

Ah, sweet, sweet caffeine. Whether your chosen delivery device is a Triple Red Eye from Starbucks or a liter of Mountain Dew, nothing beats the gentle jolt into full wakefulness provided by the humble C8H10N4O2 molecule. In a cruel twist of fate, some people are unable to brew a pot of coffee, a latte, or figure out how to open a can of Mountain Dew right after waking up, due to that very same lack of caffeine. What's a caffeine-loving geek to do?

Massachusetts sticks to its ODF guns

Filed under
OSS

I'll be honest with you. After, Peter Quinn, Massachusetts's CIO, resigned from pressure that he believed could largely be traced back to Microsoft, I didn't think the ODF (OpenDocument Format) had a chance in heck of making it into the state's offices.

It turns out I may be wrong.

Fortifying Linux against common malware

Filed under
HowTos

Securing enterprise Linux desktops against hostile code has gotten easier, thanks to Ingo Molnar's work on the NX enabler patch in Linux kernel 2.6.8 and processor-based, page protection mechanisms. The trick is in the execution, and, as usual, the Microsoft way probably is not the right choice.

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Openbox: A lightweight window manager

Filed under
HowTos

Most Linux-based distributions for the masses have either GNOME, KDE, or both desktops, yet the startup times and resources required by both GNOME and KDE make them unsuitable for old or lower-end hardware. My quest for a standards-compliant, fast, lightweight, and extensible window manager led me to Openbox.

The Two Faces of Bill Gates

Filed under
Microsoft

Bill Gates was recently named one of Time's "Persons of the Year" for his foundation's work in bringing vaccines to the poor. But bringing laptops running Linux to the poor - he's opposed to it. This week's op-ed piece looks at the two faces of Bill Gates.

uploading with an ftp macro script

Filed under
HowTos

Gather round the hearth, young nerdlings and I will tell you a tale...just let me settle my creaking bones into my rocking chair, let me wipe my rheumy eyes and nose - there, that's better. Now pass me my ear trumpet. Do give me a little prod if I nod off or my voice wavers too much. Are we all settled in now? Yes? Marvellous! Now let me tell you about ftp upload.

Doing the impossible: Versora Progression Desktop

Filed under
Reviews

Migration from Windows to Linux has always been one of those tasks that we've all been able to perform from one extent to another, but it hasn't been simple has it? Sure, it can be done, but can it be done easily? That is the ultimate question.

To GPL 3 or not to GPL 3, that is the Linux question

Filed under
OSS

Linus Torvalds made it clear on January 25th in a message to the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML), that as far as he was concerned, the Linux operating system is going to stay under General Public License 2 and not migrate to GPL 3. Discussion of the matter, however, has not come to an end.

Tomorrow's forecast: blue skies and open source

Filed under
OSS

With increasing attention on the possibilities of open source, twelve CIO executive council members recently came together via a conference call to discuss the role of open source in their organisations, focusing on topics such as this "free" software's total cost of ownership (TCO); making a business case to senior executives; the relationship with the open-source community, which shares code and answers support questions; and what types of projects are best suited for open source.

Nmap-4.00 Released

Filed under
Software

Insecure.Org is pleased to announce the immediate, free availability of the Nmap Security Scanner version 4.00 from http://www.insecure.org/nmap/. Nmap has undergone many substantial changes since our last major release (3.50 in February 2004) and we recommend that all current users upgrade.

Feb 2006 of TUX, Issue 10

Filed under
Linux

The February 2006 issue of TUX is now available for you to download. Topics this month include:
*P2P: The 4 Question
*P2p: Q&A with Mango Parfait
*TUX Explains: KDE Instant Messaging
*TUX Explains: OpenOffice.org Base
*Diversions: Neverball
*Capsule Review: Mozilla Firefox 1.5

Fill Linux to the Brim with Xen

Filed under
Software

Xen aims to be the ultimate virtual machine server. Its developers claim near-native performance, and even have pretty graphs to prove it. It achieves this by modifying the kernels of supported platforms, which of course cannot be done to closed, proprietary operating systems.

BitTorrent Client Shootout

Filed under
Software

There are a dozen or so truly robust clients for the PC, and about five or six for Mac and Linux. As is always the case, everyone has a favorite, and each client has a core group of devotees. In this article, we'll examine all of the major BitTorrent clients.

Photoshop tops "most wanted" Linux app list

Filed under
Software

Adobe Photoshop has taken an early lead as the "most wanted" Windows/MacOS-only application among Linux users, according to an online poll currently in progress on Novell's CoolSolutions community website. Autocad and Macromedia Dreamweaver are running second and third in the voting, Novell said on Wednesday.

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More in Tux Machines

First Release Candidate of Linux 5.3

  • Linux 5.3-rc1
    It's been two weeks, and the merge window is over, and Linux 5.3-rc1
    is tagged and pushed out.
    
    This is a pretty big release, judging by the commit count. Not the
    biggest ever (that honor still goes to 4.9-rc1, which was
    exceptionally big), and we've had a couple of comparable ones (4.12,
    4.15 and 4.19 were also big merge windows), but it's definitely up
    there.
    
    The merge window also started out pretty painfully, with me hitting a
    couple of bugs in the first couple of days. That's never a good sign,
    since I don't tend to do anything particularly odd, and if I hit bugs
    it means code wasn't tested well enough. In one case it was due to me
    using a simplified configuration that hadn't been tested, and caused
    an odd issue to show up - it happens. But in the other case, it really
    was code that was too recent and too rough and hadn't baked enough.
    The first got fixed, the second just got reverted.
    
    Anyway, despite the rocky start, and the big size, things mostly
    smoothed out towards the end of the merge window. And there's a lot to
    like in 5.3. Too much to do the shortlog with individual commits, of
    course, so appended is the usual "mergelog" of people I merged from
    and a one-liner very high-level "what got merged". For more detail,
    you should go check the git tree.
    
    As always: the people credited below are just the people I pull from,
    there's about 1600 individual developers (for 12500+ non-merge
    commits) in this merge window.
    
    Go test,
    
                Linus
    
  • Linux 5.3-rc1 Debuts As "A Pretty Big Release"

    Just as expected, Linus Torvalds this afternoon issued the first release candidate of the forthcoming Linux 5.3 kernel. It's just not us that have been quite eager for Linux 5.3 and its changes. Torvalds acknowledged in the 5.3-rc1 announcement that this kernel is indeed a big one: "This is a pretty big release, judging by the commit count. Not the biggest ever (that honor still goes to 4.9-rc1, which was exceptionally big), and we've had a couple of comparable ones (4.12, 4.15 and 4.19 were also big merge windows), but it's definitely up there."

  • The New Features & Improvements Of The Linux 5.3 Kernel

    The Linux 5.3 kernel merge window is expected to close today so here is our usual recap of all the changes that made it into the mainline tree over the past two weeks. There is a lot of changes to be excited about from Radeon RX 5700 Navi support to various CPU improvements and ongoing performance work to supporting newer Apple MacBook laptops and Intel Speed Select Technology enablement.

today's howtos and programming bits

  • How to fix Ubuntu live USB not booting
  • How to Create a User Account Without useradd Command in Linux?
  • Container use cases explained in depth
  • Containerization and orchestration concepts explained
  • Set_env.py

    A good practice when writing complicated software is to put in lots of debugging code. This might be extra logging, or special modes that tweak the behavior to be more understandable, or switches to turn off some aspect of your test suite so you can focus on the part you care about at the moment. But how do you control that debugging code? Where are the on/off switches? You don’t want to clutter your real UI with controls. A convenient option is environment variables: you can access them simply in the code, your shell has ways to turn them on and off at a variety of scopes, and they are invisible to your users. Though if they are invisible to your users, they are also invisible to you! How do you remember what exotic options you’ve coded into your program, and how do you easily see what is set, and change what is set?

  • RPushbullet 0.3.2

    A new release 0.3.2 of the RPushbullet package is now on CRAN. RPushbullet is interfacing the neat Pushbullet service for inter-device messaging, communication, and more. It lets you easily send alerts like the one to the left to your browser, phone, tablet, … – or all at once. This is the first new release in almost 2 1/2 years, and it once again benefits greatly from contributed pull requests by Colin (twice !) and Chan-Yub – see below for details.

  • A Makefile for your Go project (2019)

    My most loathed feature of Go was the mandatory use of GOPATH: I do not want to put my own code next to its dependencies. I was not alone and people devised tools or crafted their own Makefile to avoid organizing their code around GOPATH.

  • Writing sustainable Python scripts

    Python is a great language to write a standalone script. Getting to the result can be a matter of a dozen to a few hundred lines of code and, moments later, you can forget about it and focus on your next task. Six months later, a co-worker asks you why the script fails and you don’t have a clue: no documentation, hard-coded parameters, nothing logged during the execution and no sensible tests to figure out what may go wrong. Turning a “quick-and-dirty” Python script into a sustainable version, which will be easy to use, understand and support by your co-workers and your future self, only takes some moderate effort. 

  • Notes to self when using genRSS.py

The Status of Fractional Scaling (HiDPI) Between Windows & Linux

There’s a special type of displays commonly called “HiDPI“, which means that the number of pixels in the screen is doubled (vertically and horizontally), making everything drawn on the screen look sharper and better. One of the most common examples of HiDPI are Apple’s Retina displays, which do come with their desktops and laptops. However, one issue with HiDPI is that the default screen resolutions are too small to be displayed on them, so we need what’s called as “scaling”; Which is simply also doubling the drawn pixels from the OS side so that they can match that of the display. Otherwise, displaying a 400×400 program window on a 3840×2160 display will give a very horrible user experience, so the OS will need to scale that window (and everything) by a factor of 2x, to make it 800×800, which would make it better. Fractional scaling is the process of doing the previous work, but by using fractional scaling numbers (E.g 1.25, 1.4, 1.75.. etc), so that they can be customized better according to the user’s setup and needs. Now where’s the issue, you may ask? Windows operating system has been supporting such kind of displays natively for a very long time, but Linux distributions do lack a lot of things in this field. There are many drawbacks, issues and other things to consider. This article will take you in a tour about that. Read more Also: Vulkan 1.1.116 Published With Subgroup Size Control Extension

Android Leftovers