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About Tux Machines

Monday, 09 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story The Linux Desktop-a-week review: Cinnamon Roy Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 3:36pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 3:59pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 4:01pm
Story Third Release of KDE Frameworks Brings a Multitude of Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 4:05pm
Story Kano's DIY computer teaches kids to code, and now it's available to everyone Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 4:17pm
Story Spotify is Powered by Linux and Open Source Roy Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 4:30pm
Story Untangle Next Generation (NG) Firewall Is Now Based on Debian "Wheezy" Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 4:35pm
Story Gummersbach completes switch to open source Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 4:53pm
Story Many ACPI & Power Management Changes For Linux 3.18 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 5:06pm
Story Diversity is a crucial component of meritocracy Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 5:54pm

Adventures in a New Ubuntu 6.10 Clean Install

Filed under
Ubuntu

This will be a series of posts called the Adventures in a New Ubuntu 6.10 Clean Install. I will document my entire experience in preparing for a re-installation of Ubuntu from 6.06.1 to Ubuntu 6.10 with a format.

Ubuntu Edgy Eft Installation

Filed under
HowTos

Ubuntu 6.10, codename Edgy Eft, has been released on the 26th October 2006. This is the latest version of Ubuntu available and this tutorial will go through the installation process of Ubuntu Edgy Eft using the 6.10 release.

Henry in Demand

Filed under
Humor

It is a new day. An important day, because on this morning the call that I have been waiting all of my life for has finally come. Yes, Mozilla wants my super powers!

Rsync Backup Web interface, Frontend or GUI Tools

Filed under
HowTos

rsync is a replacement for rcp (and scp) that has many more features. It uses the “rsync algorithm” which provides a very fast method for remote files into sync. It does this by sending just the differences in the files across the link, without requiring that both sets of files are present at one of the ends of the link beforehand. Here are some of the tools to manage rsync easily.

Read More.

Pretty Widgets for Firefox for Linux

Filed under
Moz/FF

The switch to Ubuntu has had it’s ups and downs. But one annoyance I had was the un-styled ‘widgets’ in Firefox look like *ss. I found one person who customized it a little bit to work with Linux. I made a couple minor tweaks and repackaged it and am now sharing with all.

FC6 Xen - no luck here

Filed under
Linux

I first installed Fedora Core 6 in a Parallels Virtual Machine. That was fine, but I quickly realized that I wanted to investigate this more deeply, and especially wanted to look at the Xen integration. So, I created CD's and did the install on "Trusty Old Spare". Yeah.. well, yes, but.. things didn't go so well.

Also: Howto: Using Beryl in Fedora Core 6

firefox 2 million

Filed under
Moz/FF

Apparently, people loves them some Firefox. Within 24 hours of the official launch on Tuesday, there were over 2 million people using Firefox 2, and we were seeing a peak rate of more than 30 downloads per second from our website.

The Perfect Setup - Ubuntu 6.10 Server (Edgy Eft)

Filed under
HowTos

This is a detailed description about how to set up a Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft) based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. This tutorial is written for the 32-bit version of Ubuntu Edgy Eft, but should apply to the 64-bit version with very little modifications as well.

http://www.howtoforge.com/perfect_setup_ubuntu_6.10

Linux Usage on the Rise in Large Companies

Filed under
Linux

Linux usage in the servers of large companies is continuing to rise. 73% of enterprise companies are running Linux on at least some of their servers. Just six months ago that figure was 67% and a year ago it was 65%, as per Evans Data Corp's latest Enterprise Development Issues Survey...

MyahOS 2.3 - Cute, but not entirely functional

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

MyahOS was one of a growing number of distributions that come out of left field and are recommended to me by posters at LinuxForums. It's based on Slackware, which posters of LinuxForums will know isn't exactly my favorite distribution.

Ubuntu vs. SUSE Linux

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu

I hadn’t really given Ubuntu a fair shake the last time I looked at it. I decided to go another round with Ubuntu to see what it was all about. The initial act of downloading Ubuntu is easier than SUSE.

Upgrade to Ubuntu Edgy (6.10) - and a look back on the switch

Filed under
Ubuntu

Try a search on quite a few blogs and you’ll find stories on switching to Linux, but somehow a few months or a year later you see the same person talking a lot about Windows-Software and Windows-Gadgets in a way that makes it clear, that at some point they switched back. So I the past months I was keen on seeing whether I got to that point where I just wanted to “get back to good old Windows” – the short answer: it never came.

Happy Anniversary GoblinX

Filed under
Linux

The GoblinX Team is celebrating its second anniversary of life. The very first edition was released at October, 28 2004. During these twenty-four months we devoted our efforts to create a great liveCD distribution.

Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy Eft Upgrade plus Compiz goodness on AIGLX

Filed under
HowTos

Well, apparently on the Internet, people have having trouble upgrading. I had the exact same problems and I’m going to describe steps to take to resolve them. Killing 2 birds with 1 stone, I’ll explain as well how to get you some Compiz eye-candy.

Regular Expressions: Tile makes Tcl look good

Filed under
Software

Tile will change the face of computing. Well, maybe. It could; Tile's a Tcl project, though, and Tcl doesn't operate the same as other languages or programs. So, while Tile might have an enormous affect on standard practices for development of graphical user interface (GUI) projects, there are no guarantees.

Taking the Linux Plunge – Commercial versus Community; which path is right for you and your hardware

Filed under
Linux

When Microsoft announced the end of support for Windows 98 and Millennium Edition on June 30th, there was a lot of talk of these users migrating over to Linux Desktops. According to OneStat.com, this is approximately 4% of the total PCs in the world. With Linux clocking in at only 0.4%, this means for every ten PCs, only one has Linux installed compared to these two Microsoft OS’s that are no longer supported. That leaves a lot of room for market share penetration that someone really could, and probably should for these users’ sake, take advantage of.

Linux vs. Solaris

Filed under
Linux

On Monday I posted Geekbench results for my Sun Ultra 20 M2 running Solaris and Windows. Afterwards, I received a number of requests asking how Linux performed on the same hardware.

New Linux Security Products Glimmer On Horizon

Filed under
Linux

Beyond displaying an extensive slate of existing Linux products, vendors at this week's InfoSecurity show pointed to possible future offerings ranging from a Linux client for a CD-ROM encryption system to a Linux-enabled all-in-one device for securing both physical access and video surveillance.

What's New in Python 2.5

Filed under
Software

It's hard to believe Python is more than 15 years old already. While that may seem old for a programming language, in the case of Python it means the language is mature. In spite of its age, the newest versions of Python are powerful, providing everything you would expect from a modern programming language. This article provides a rundown of the new and important features of Python 2.5.

Mark Shuttleworth: Firefox and Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

I’m sure many folks are aware of the tension between Mozilla and Debian over the use of the name “Firefox” for the web browser package. First, let me say that both groups are being entirely reasonable about their positions. My goal in our own discussions with Mozilla has been to establish that it really is possible for a distribution that cares about free software and Mozilla to agree on a framework which gives us both what we need. Nobody sold out.

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More in Tux Machines

New Linux Kernel Update for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 & CentOS 7 Fixes Two Bugs

The new Linux kernel update, which is available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and CentOS Linux 7 systems, is only a bugfix release, not a security update, addressing a bug that made applications consume the entire allocated CPU quota, as well as to backport the "sched: Fix race between task_group and sched_task_group" fix. Users are advised to update their kernel packages in all the supported systems (see below for details) to kernel-3.10.0-1062.9.1.el7.x86_64.rpm and related packages, all of which are available to install for free from the stable software repositories of all supported Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 operating system variants and CentOS Linux 7. Read more

New, fully working Ubuntu Linux images now available for Raspberry Pi

While most Raspberry Pi owners opt for Raspbian as their operating system, the tiny barebones board can run a number of other Linux distros, including Ubuntu. There was a major problem with the previous Ubuntu images though -- a kernel bug prevented USB ports from working on the 4GB RAM model of the Raspberry Pi 4. A temporary workaround was proposed, but Canonical has finally fixed the flaw, and made updated 32 and 64-bit images of Ubuntu available for the Raspberry Pi 2, 3 and 4, which you can download now. Read more

Slimbook & Kubuntu - Combat Report 11

The Slimbook remains a smart, useful choice. I am amazing that a whole year's gone by. The laptop is holding amazing well. I'm using it outside quite some, and yet, there are no scratches or dents or anything, and neither the heat nor the cold phase it, and the battery change remains full and fresh, as good as new. People are also drawn to its sleek, understated look, and often comment and ask me about the name. Kubuntu 18.04 is also top-notch. I do have some small struggles, and I'd like to see several outstanding issues polished. But then, all in all, you get a slick, aesthetic product, it looks like something you could pay money for and feel it's the right thing to do, and overall, it's highly consistent and robust. That would be all for this episode. No great drama or fuss, which is exactly how I like my productivity. Take care. Read more

What Free Software, FOSS, and Open Source Share in Common

In any field, activists can be each other’s worst enemies — and FOSS is no exception. Simply for suggesting that free software and open source have more similarities than differences, I have been denounced as a capitalist-shill, and worse. Yet, even a casual glance around proves FOSS is an alliance of overlapping yet separate interests. True, many of us have little in common with certain members of the alliance — I, for example, couldn’t care less about why corporations support FOSS, despite the denouncements — but that’s the nature of an alliance. Moreover, without those sometimes competing interests, I doubt FOSS would be such an overwhelming success. I count at least four major interests within FOSS today: the academic, the corporate, the hobbyists, and the political. Almost certainly, there are more. Read more