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About Tux Machines

Friday, 18 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story As patent trolls fade, a group formed to combat them thrives Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 12:54pm
Story BEST DISTRO 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 2:33pm
Story F2FS File-System Gets Even Better With Linux 3.18 Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 4:06pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 4:18pm
Story Kernel 3.17 and kdbus – the kernel column Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 4:20pm
Story AMD Moves Forward With Unified Linux Driver Strategy, New Kernel Driver Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 4:31pm
Story The Source of Vulnerabilities, How Red Hat finds out about vulnerabilities. Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 4:44pm
Story Behind the scenes with CTO Michael DeHaan of Ansible Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 4:48pm
Story Enterprise Adoption of Open Source Practices is On the Rise Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 5:10pm
Story Adobe Digital Editions 4 Spies on Users - Because of DRM Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 5:20pm

Linux looms large on world’s software horizon

Filed under
Linux

Linux vs. Microsoft — is this a legitimate contest? Will Microsoft remain a mighty empire forever? It’s not easy to predict the future of software development, but I am certain that the Linux phenomenon is a bright spot on the radar screen.

New book helps users master Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

A new book aimed at both new and experienced users of Ubuntu Linux is due out in August. The Official Ubuntu Book, from Prentice Hall ($34.99), covers all the important facets of the popular new Linux distribution, and features a foreword by Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth.

Updating and installing software in Ubuntu (Linux.com training videos)

Filed under
Ubuntu

The first video in this pair shows you how to update all the software in your Ubuntu GNU/Linux installation in a single, big gulp. The second video shows you how easy it is to install and remove software with the Synaptic Package Manager.

Google joins OpenDocument group

Filed under
Google

Google has joined a group that is promoting an OpenDocument Format standard that allows people to open documents regardless of the application they were created in.

Create mosaic movies with Perl, ImageMagick, and MPlayer

Filed under
HowTos

Use Perl, ImageMagick, and MPlayer to create mosaic movies composed of frames from other movies. Zoom out from the center of a large text-overlay image made up of sequential frames of existing movies. Disassemble, composite, and encode your own mosaic-type movies for special promotional or home video events.

Overhauled CUPS: Improved Unix Printing

Filed under
Software

CUPS (Common Unix Printing System) version 1.2 was released last month, bursting with over 90 fabulous new features and improvements. Today we'll take a look at them and decide how fabulous they really are.

Net Neutrality: A Threat to Operating Systems

Filed under
Misc

Is net neutrality a threat to the birth of viable online operating systems? Some believe so, while others feel that the neutrality of the Internet is not even in any sort of danger.

Development Release: SUSE Linux 10.2 Alpha 2

Filed under
SUSE

Andreas Jaeger has announced the release of the second alpha build of SUSE Linux 10.2, together with the decision to rename SUSE Linux to openSUSE.

SLES 10: Not Your Father's Suse

Filed under
SUSE

Aside from the obvious changes wrought from the switch from KDE to Gnome, the default desktop layout has changed completely in SLES 10. Gone is the throat-lozenge-with-a-red-N applications menu, along with nearly all of SLES 9's taskbar clutter.

Book review: Understanding Open Source and Free Software Licensing

Filed under
Reviews

When you develop an open source work or use an open source work, it is important that you understand the license. A well written license protects both you and the user. According to the information found on the O’Reilly website, “Andrew M. St. Laurent is an experienced lawyer with a long-time interest in intellectual property, particularly software licensing”. Rest assured, after reading this book you will have a new appreciation for those who work daily with licensing issues.

Linux pinfo

Filed under
HowTos

I have never liked Linux "info". The reason is simple enough: I don't like Emacs, and "info" uses an emacs style interface. Pinfo displays the same "info" files, but is more lynx like; up and down arrows move you from clickable link to clickable link, right arrow invokes a link, left arrow returns you to the previous page.

Red Hat evolves with a techie camp

Filed under
Linux

Ethan Boyette has known for some time that he wanted be a computer engineer. But when it came to a possible employer, Red Hat was never on the list. That is, until this week.

Also: Red Hat Looks To Symposium To Spread The Gospel

Accessing network resources in a mixed environment

Filed under
HowTos

The first thing that comes to most sysadmins' minds when they hear about file and print services in mixed Windows and Linux environments is probably Samba, but you can also make a rock-solid system for sharing resources via NFS on the *nix platform and DiskShare on Windows.

Kubuntu Clash: Should I stay or should I go?

Over the past month or so I have been dipping my big toe into the Linux pool, just testing the waters. The reason for a move to Linux isn't one based on the love of open source, free choice or free software, the reason is far more capital, the devil drives when the bills need paying, work. Anyway, over the past weeks of swimming with Linux I've had less sleep than I have in a long long while, I've been more frustrated, argumentative, pounding the keyboard and flicking the finger(s) at the screen. Is this the norm?

n/a

Firefox 2.0 Beta 1 Is No Slam-Dunk

Filed under
Moz/FF
Reviews

Review: eWEEK Labs' tests show that Version 2.0 of the browser will be a worthy upgrade, but competitors—including Internet Explorer 7—are inching ahead.

Debian server hacked

Filed under
Security

"Early this morning we discovered that someone had managed to compromise gluck.debian.org," Debian developer James Troup wrote in an e-mail to the Debian community shortly before 4am AEST.

Windows power user tries Xandros

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I recently performed an experiment at the request of my husband, GeekTimeLinux Dave. He was preparing to review the new Xandros distribution, which has been described as the perfect distribution for a Windows user trying to make the switch to Linux.

Novell's SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

You no longer have to be an uber-geek to run a Linux server. With the release of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10, Novell has at last put out a product that's as easy to install, administer and use as a Windows server--in some cases, even easier.

What's New In Firefox 2.0

Filed under
Moz/FF

It's a new day for Mozilla. Only a few days after OneStat reported that its Firefox Web browser has reached nearly 13% market share worldwide, the open-source software development organization this morning released Beta 1 of Firefox 2.0. With this release, Firefox devotees will be widely testing the next version of the browser.

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More in Tux Machines

Networking SBCs run Linux on quad -A53 and -A72 NXP LS chips

Forlinx’s sandwich-style OK1043A-C and OK1046A SBCs run Linux on NXP’s quad -A53 LS1043A and quad -A72 LS1046A SoCs, respectively, and offer a 10GbE port and up to 6x GbE ports with optional SFP. Forlinx has posted product pages for two similar COM Express modules and carrier boards that run Linux on NXP’s networking focused LS series processors. The FET1043A-C module taps the up to 1.6GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A53 LS1043A while the FET1046A-C uses the up to 1.8GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A72 LS1046A. All the processors are headless — without GPUs. Read more

Security: WireGuard, Birds and Updates

  • WireGuard Restored In Android's Google Play Store After Brief But Controversial Removal

    After Google dropped the open-source WireGuard app from their Play Store since it contained a donation link, the app has now been restored within Google's software store for Android users but without the donation option. The WireGuard app for Android makes it easy to setup the secure VPN tunnel software on mobile devices, similar to its port to iOS and other platforms. The WireGuard apps are free but have included a donation link to the WireGuard website should anyone wish to optionally make a donation to support the development of this very promising network tech.

  • Letting Birds scooters fly free

    At that point I had everything I need to write a simple app to unlock the scooters, and it worked! For about 2 minutes, at which point the network would notice that the scooter was unlocked when it should be locked and sent a lock command to force disable the scooter again. Ah well. So, what else could I do? The next thing I tried was just modifying some STM firmware and flashing it onto a board. It still booted, indicating that there was no sort of verified boot process. Remember what I mentioned about the throttle being hooked through the STM32's analogue to digital converters[3]? A bit of hacking later and I had a board that would appear to work normally, but about a minute after starting the ride would cut the throttle. Alternative options are left as an exercise for the reader. Finally, there was the component I hadn't really looked at yet. The Quectel modem actually contains its own application processor that runs Linux, making it significantly more powerful than any of the chips actually running the scooter application[4]. The STM communicates with the modem over serial, sending it an AT command asking it to make an SSL connection to a remote endpoint. It then uses further AT commands to send data over this SSL connection, allowing it to talk to the internet without having any sort of IP stack. Figuring out just what was going over this connection was made slightly difficult by virtue of all the debug functionality having been ripped out of the STM's firmware, so in the end I took a more brute force approach - I identified the address of the function that sends data to the modem, hooked up OpenOCD to the SWD pins on the STM, ran OpenOCD's gdb stub, attached gdb, set a breakpoint for that function and then dumped the arguments being passed to that function. A couple of minutes later and I had a full transaction between the scooter and the remote. The scooter authenticates against the remote endpoint by sending its serial number and IMEI. You need to send both, but the IMEI didn't seem to need to be associated with the serial number at all. New connections seemed to take precedence over existing connections, so it would be simple to just pretend to be every scooter and hijack all the connections, resulting in scooter unlock commands being sent to you rather than to the scooter or allowing someone to send fake GPS data and make it impossible for users to find scooters.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (poppler, sudo, and wordpress), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, and kernel), and SUSE (kernel and postgresql10).

Android Leftovers

Xfce4-Panel Adds Dark Mode Preference

Landing this week in xfce4-panel was this commit providing a dark mode preference for Xfce4, similar to the growing trend with other desktops/UIs for those wanting a "dark mode" interface. Enabling this option will request the GTK dark theme variant of capable themes. For a long time now GTK has exposed a property (gtk-application-prefer-dark-theme) for preferring dark themes while now is being tapped by xfce4-panel. Read more