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Thursday, 05 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Planning for Ubuntu 7.04 - the "Feisty Fawn"

Filed under
Ubuntu

With the final release of Ubuntu 6.10 approaching, and apparently set to be spot on schedule October 26th, we're starting to look beyond it to Ubuntu 7.04, scheduled for release on 19 April 2007.

Tux Games to be at the UK Linux Expo

Filed under
Gaming

On the 25th and 26th of October, Tux Games will be at the UK Linux Expo where they will be giving away thousands of pounds worth of freebies, letting people play games for free at their stand, and selling the latest Linux games.

Novell, IBM partner on integrated Linux server stack

Filed under
Linux

Let's say you own a small to medium sized business, and you want to use Linux, but you're not crazy about the idea of mixing and matching software and servers. If that's you, Novell and IBM want to talk to you about their new Integrated Stack for SUSE Linux Enterprise.

Linux desktop driver woes: Laying blame, lobbying, coping

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Linux

Driver support is a sore spot, a very sore spot, for any organization using or considering a migration to Linux desktops. It's a pain for longtime Linux users too. In fact, many Linux desktop advocates, users and user wannabes say it is a rock-hard barrier to adoption.

EyeOS, an open source Web operating system

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OS

Web operating systems are essentially personal productivity environments implemented using Web browsers, AJAX, and other Rich Internet Application technologies with data and additional services being provided by a Web server.

The future of Debian Weekly News

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Linux

As you might have noticed, the Debian Weekly News has come to a stop as Martin "Joey" Schulze stopped working on it as a indirect consequence of Dunc-tank. The question is "now what"?

Logical partitioning in the System p5 environment

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Linux

Learn the basics of how to partition an IBM System p5 server. Logical partitioning (LPAR) is the ability to logically slice up a single system's CPU, memory, and other resources to create multiple and separate servers. Wouldn't it be nice to consolidate all of those servers onto just a few pieces of hardware to more fully utilize your resources and yet still maintain separate OS environments for each of the applications? With the IBM POWER5-based servers, you can do just that.

Review: Slackware goes to 11

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Reviews
Slack

Slackware Linux 11 was released at the beginning of this month, which marks 13 years of continued development. Slackware Linux, while not the first Linux distribution, is the oldest surviving one, and is starting to show signs of aging.

How to back up and restore your Ubuntu machine

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HowTos

There are many, many different ways to back up your Ubuntu system. Here we’re going to look at two of them, one of which is a full system backup and the other is a way to copy folders and files.

Opera goes on the hunt against fraud with 9.1

Filed under
Software

Opera announced today that it is joining the likes of Firefox 2 and IE 7 by including antiphishing technology in its web browser. Will it help stem the tide of online fraud?

Install XFCE Desktop in Ubuntu

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HowTos

Xfce is a lightweight desktop environment for unix-like operating systems. It aims to be fast and lightweight, while still being visually appealing and easy to use.Xfce is an easy-to-use and easy-to-configure environment for X11 based on GTK2. A priority is adherence to standards, specifically those defined at freedesktop.org.

Google Reader take 2: Not bad at all

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Google

The first version of Google's RSS reader, which debuted in October 2005, was so light on features that it was more of a curiosity than a serious application. Now the wizards in white coats at Google Labs have cooked up a new version. The almost completely reworked Google Reader includes a slew of new features and improvements that make the Web-based application a viable alternative to the existing desktop and online RSS readers.

Reiser's software work suffering after his arrest

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Reiser

Before he was arrested in connection with his wife's disappearance, Hans Reiser had gained a reputation as an innovative but controversial figure in the software development world.

Dumping Cisco for open-source

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OSS

The open-source movement, which has long made inroads into corporations via Linux and other enterprise-level software, now has a potentially bigger target in its cross hairs: the PBXs and network routers from companies such as Cisco Systems Inc. that form the basis of networking infrastructure.

Oracle-Ubuntu tie-up coming?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Christopher Kenyon, Canonical's business development manager, offered another crumb in a recent interview, when he said Oracle makes sure its 10G Express version works on Ubuntu.

Running A File-, Print-, Proxy-, DHCP-, AND Time-Server For Small/Medium Enterprises

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HowTos

This article shows how to run a file-, print-, HTTP proxy- DHCP-, and time server for small and medium enterprises (SME) on one single Debian Sarge system. It is very easy to set up, and management is done with an easy-to-use web interface called eBox so once the system is set up, you can forget about the command line. eBox was developed to administrate advanced services for corporate networks, and it was created for Debian Sarge.

http://www.howtoforge.com/debian_ebox

Three reasons to use KDE

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KDE

Sal Cangeloso’s writeup (three reasons to use GNOME) inspired me to talk about the flip side of the coin. Yes, I know it’s smug to pretend that there’s only KDE and GNOME; yet KDE is my desktop of choice, and here’s why. Of course, Sal’s right when he says lists are the effective way to convey information in writing, so I’ll take a page from his book and do so:

Upgrade Ubuntu 6.06 (Dapper Drake) to Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft)

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HowTos

Ubuntu 6.10 is the current development version of the Ubuntu operating system. It is to be released in October 26th.The common name given to this release from the time of its early development was “Edgy Eft”. Today I have upgraded my Ubuntu Dapper Machine to Ubuntu Edgy this is still is beta version.

Writing documents with OpenOffice.org Writer

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HowTos

Everybody uses word processors, but very few people use them in the right way. Maybe it’s time you learned to use your word processor with... style!

Yamefa…another Linux Distribution?!

Filed under
Ubuntu

And so begins to take life another Linux distribution (french made) Yamefa, this time it is a KUbuntu based distribution.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Migrating the MAAS UI from AngularJS to React

MAAS (metal as a service), is a Canonical product which allows for very fast server provisioning and data centre management. Around 2014, work began to build a rich UI for MAAS, primarily using the AngularJS JavaScript framework from Google. AngularJS today is in long term support (LTS) and due to reach end-of-life in 2021. This year we began the work of transitioning away from AngularJS in anticipation of this impending EOL to more contemporary tooling. Evaluating Angular vs React Google’s recommended upgrade path for applications built in AngularJS is to transition to the Angular framework. Despite the similarity in naming, Angular is very different from AngularJS architecturally, and the migration process is non-trivial. While components (allowing for the now ubiquitous uni-directional data architectural pattern) were later backported from Angular to AngularJS, most of MAAS UI predated this and consequently migration to Angular would require significant app-wide refactoring. Since the inception of the MAAS UI, a number of other products had been built at Canonical using React. As we had developed significant experience using React, and tooling in the surrounding ecosystem, ultimately it made more sense to invest in transitioning the MAAS UI to React rather than Angular. This choice conferred additional benefits, such as standardising our build and testing infrastructure, and allows for component reuse across products. We also just generally enjoy working with React, and feel that the most significant developments in web UI technology are happening within the React ecosystem (hooks, concurrent mode, suspense, CRA). Read more

Haiku almost-monthly activity report - October and November 2019

The last two months have been quite busy for me and I had no time to write up a report. Remember that everyone is welcome to contribute to the website and if you wand to write the report from time to time, this would be much appreciated, by me because I wouldn’t need to do it, and by others because they will enjoy reading things written with a different style and perspective. Anyway, let’s look at what’s going on! Let’s start with the non-technical side of things. The months of october and november are traditionally quite active in Haiku (matching with our autumn-themed logo, of course). There was no BeGeistert this year, but I attended Alchimie and Capitole du Libre with mmu_man, while Korli, scottmc and Hy Che went to the GSoC mentor summit, which was in Germany this year. These events are an opportunity to advertise Haiku a bit, share ideas and projects with other alternative operating systems such as MorphOS, ReactOS, FreeBSD, or RTEMS, and overall meet other people working on open source software. All while managing this, we also had to get ready for Google Code-In, which is celebrating its 10th year. We are the only project with enough contributors and ideas to be able to participate every year since the contest was established, and look forward to what our contestants will accomplish this year. The first patches are already getting to our Gerrit code review. Read more Also: BeOS-Inspired Haiku Continues Working On 64-bit ARM, Other Hardware Improvements

Linux-Capable and Linux-Ready Hardware

  • Rugged Versalogic board expands upon Intel Apollo Lake

    Versalogic’s rugged, Linux-ready “Owl” SBC has an Intel Apollo Lake SoC with up to 8GB soldered ECC RAM, 8GB to 32GB eMMC, 2x GbE, 5x USB, 4x serial, and 2x mini-PCIe, plus SATA, LVDS, and mini-DP++. Versalogic announced a Linux-friendly SBC due in 1Q 2020 that continues its line of rugged, double-board Embedded Processing Unit (EPU) products built around Intel’s Apollo Lake Atom SoCs. The Owl will come out around the same time as the recently announced, avionics oriented Harrier, which followed a similar Osprey boardset from 2016.

  • Versalogic Owl Small Form Factor Apollo Lake Embedded Computer Targets Military & Industrial Applications

    VersaLogic Owl VL-EPU-4012 Embedded System Computer In October 2019 we reported on the VersaLogic Harrier computer that was slightly bigger than a credit card.

  • Tiny USB bridge board helps tame I2C traffic

    Excamera has gone to Crowd Supply to launch a tiny, open source “I2CMini” USB-to-I2C bridge board for controlling and monitoring I2C traffic. The $17 device has a Qwiic connector, a 4-pin header, and a micro-USB port. A year ago, Excamera Labs launched a $29 I2CDriver I2C debugging board. Now the company has returned to Crowd Supply to pitch a simpler, $17 I2CMini USB-to-I2C bridge device that is similarly designed to plug into a Linux, Mac, or Windows computer via a micro-USB port.

  • Edge AI motherboard combines Coffee Lake with MXM-linked Nvidia GPU cards

    Ibase unveiled a Linux-supported “MT800M-P” motherboard for AI applications with an 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPU and an MXM slot for Nvidia GPU cards. Other features include 4x GbE, 2x DP, PCIe, M.2, and mini-PCIe. After watching the embedded industry squeeze and shrink their products for power- and space-efficient IoT devices, we’ve lately seen a modest trend towards giganticism as systems bulk up to support full-size GPU boards for edge AI applications. The latest is Ibase’s 270 x 220mm Intel Coffee Lake based MT800M-P SBC, which supports AI services such as speech recognition, image analysis, and visual search and media processing in the retail, banking and transportation industries.

  • Rikomagic MK25 Amlogic S922X TV Box Supports Digital Signage Features
  • Marlin 2.0 Open Source 3D Printer Firmware Finally Released

    Back in June, we wrote about Marlin 2.0 firmware supporting ESP32 3D printer board, but at the time the firmware was still in RC1 (Release for Comment) phase.

  • Qualcomm Unveils Snapdragon 865, 765, and 765G 5G Mobile Platforms
  • NVIDIA Looks To Have Some Sort Of Open-Source Driver Announcement For 2020

    We were tipped off by a Phoronix reader to this GTC session for GTC 2020 by NVIDIA engineer John Hubbard. It's about "Open Source, Linux Kernel, and NVIDIA." The talk abstract is: "We'll report up-to-the-minute developments on NVIDIA's status and activities, and possibly (depending on last-minute developments) a few future plans and directions, regarding our contributions to Linux kernel; supporting Nouveau (the open source kernel driver for NVIDIA GPUs, that is in the Linux kernel), including signed firmware behavior, documentation, and patches; and NVIDIA kernel drivers." Color us surprised and damn excited, as long as their announcement is substantive.