Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 26 May 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story [rust-dev] Rust 0.10 Released Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 11:13pm
Story Fedora 21 to Feature KDE Frameworks 5 and MATE 1.8 Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 11:06pm
Story Blink’s First Birthday Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 10:59pm
Story Amazon’s Fire TV could scorch rivals Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 10:44pm
Story NVIDIA's Tegra K1 Jetson Will Be A Late April Debut Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 10:40pm
Story Steam Beta Client Released with Improved OpenGL Capture Speed Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 10:33pm
Story IoT on tap at upcoming Embedded Linux Conference Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 10:12pm
Story Chrome Remote Desktop Goes Into Beta on Android, Here is a Quick Look Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 10:02pm
Story Chrome Slips By Firefox in the War of the Browsers Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 9:52pm
Blog entry Manchester and Computing Roy Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 4:13pm

Red Hat Creates Fedora Foundation

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat Inc. has decided to hand over control of the open-source Fedora Project, creating the new Fedora Foundation to manage the project.

Open source licence pruning about to begin

Filed under
OSS

As the Open Source Initiative (OSI) is readying a group to tackle the issues of licence proliferation, earlier proposals to solve the problem have fallen into disgrace.

Linux Muscles Into M$'s Space

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Is Linux a better choice for business than, say, a proprietary operating system such as Microsoft Windows? The debate, full of passion and conviction, rages on both sides of this issue.

With Linux, the uptime is high, the price is low, and the flexibility is amazing.

Nothing Says Hot Like Babes Wearing Shiny Plastic

Filed under
Hardware

The use of booth babes in trade shows is nothing new. However, Computex uses booth babes for more than just decoration. Unlike other trade shows where the girls just stand around and look good, the babes are Computex can be divided into four working groups.

Sony cracks down on PSP importers

Filed under
Gaming

A legal fight is brewing in Britain between Sony and the grey-market importers who are selling its highly sought-after PlayStation Portable device ahead of the official Sept. 1 European launch date.

'Pepsi Smash' to show on Yahoo

Filed under
Web

If you can`t make it on television, you might want to try "Yahoo!"

Net porn plan labelled 'obscene'

Filed under
Web

The creation of the .xxx net domain has come under fire from net veterans.

Group revives effort to define spyware

Filed under
Security

Anti-spyware software makers are taking another shot at creating a definition of spyware, this time with help from consumer organizations.

I may not know how to define spy-ware, but I know it when I see it!

Geek My House: Building a Kitchen PC

Filed under
Hardware

From the same people that brought you Build an $800 Gaming PC, now present The Kitchen PC. "A sprinkle of this and a spinkle of that..."

Building a Mandriva 2005 Desktop

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

A first-timers guide to installing and configuring Mandriva Linux

Quake 4 Screenshots

Filed under
Gaming

Currently in development by Raven Software in cooperation with id Software, QUAKE 4 is the first game to utilize id Software's revolutionary DOOM 3 technology.

Nvidia to unveil next-gen GPU

Filed under
Hardware

Graphics manufacturer to present its new chip and give live demonstrations at San Francisco launch event in three weeks.

PlayStation 3 to launch without bundled hard disk?

Filed under
Gaming

Sony Computer Entertainment's chief technology officer Masayuki Chatani has cast doubt on the company's plans to include a hard disk unit in the PlayStation 3's launch package next spring.

Forging an anti-terrorism search tool

Filed under
Misc

Google is the No. 1 free tool to snoop on friends or strangers. But government agencies including the Federal Aviation Administration are investing in a new search engine being developed at the University of Buffalo to do some of their more sensitive detective work.

M$ vs. Linux: Execs Talk Detente

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft has invited Michael Tiemann, president of the Open Source Initiative, to start a constructive dialogue. Tiemann says he'll take the offer at face value but calls it an "attempt to quell an internal civil war" at Microsoft.

M$ Says MSN Site Hacked in S. Korea

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft acknowledged Thursday that hackers booby-trapped its popular MSN Web site in South Korea to try to steal passwords from visitors. The company said it was unclear how many Internet users might have been victimized.

n/a

One Fine Trick

Those cute Southpark icons on the right of his desktop represent folks in his instant messenger list. They change coloration to indicate their online status. Ain't that the neato-ist thing?

Open source projects 'need more customer focus'

Filed under
OSS

Developers have been urged to pay more attention to issues such as support, documentation and roadmaps if they want companies to trust open source.

NASA: Two white dwarf stars to merge

Filed under
Sci/Tech

A scientist using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found evidence that two white dwarf stars are orbiting each other in a death grip, destined to merge.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

  • The Power Of Open Source AI
    he open source software movement produced iconic innovations like the Firefox web browser, Apache server software and the Linux operating system—the genesis of the Android OS that currently powers 86% of the world’s smartphones. It also fostered a mindset around continuous improvement of tools that can be collaboratively shared, improved upon and distributed.
  • Apache Dubbo, the Java-based open source RPC framework becomes a Top-Level Project
    The Apache Software Foundation announced that the Java-based open source RPC framework used by giants like Alibaba, Apache Dubbo, is now a Top-Level Project. Let’s have a look at what this framework is all about. Apache Dubbo is a high-performance, Java-based Remote Procedure Call framework that has been in use at more than 150 companies, including giants like Alibaba Group or the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China. The Dubbo project was originally developed at Alibaba and open-sourced in 2011. It entered the Apache Incubator in February 2018 and the Apache Software Foundation announced that Dubbo is now a Top-Level Project!
  • Bridging divides with open source
    Application delivery is changing. At the risk of using buzzwords, it is being transformed – digitally. Continuous delivery has become the norm for DevOps (71 per cent plan on implementing, according to a study conducted by F5 and RedHat – NetOps Meets DevOps: The State of Network Automation), and continuous deployment must follow if business is to succeed in the era of Application Capital. While 73 per cent of organisations plan on pursuing continuous deployment, nearly half of them have yet to begin. A staggering 42 per cent have yet to automate a single component of the continuous deployment pipeline (according to a study conducted by F5 and RedHat – NetOps Meets DevOps: The State of Network Automation). [...] Applications themselves are mainly developed today from third-party components, a majority of them open source. Application infrastructure is increasingly built from open source components. From web servers to app servers, databases to ingress control, messaging to container runtimes and orchestration. IT operations are driven by open source tools like Puppet, Chef, Terraform, Helm, Kubernetes, and Ansible. These technologies are adopted because they answer multiple challenges: fast, frequent delivery and deployment along with a frictionless business model. They also encourage collaboration and innovation when entire organisations move to standardise on open source-based operations. None of that is possible without the passionate communities of developers who work tirelessly to improve their open source solutions. At F5, we appreciate the value of such communities. In a comparable example, our DevCentral community is based on collaborative innovation, guided by many of the same principles that drive open source projects. Code sharing and knowledge transfers across the community help the hundreds of thousands of members innovate and create new capabilities for our BIG-IP platform. With those solutions come new extensions, plug-ins, and libraries for open source projects like Puppet and Chef and node.js.
  • Open Source Analytics Platform Grafana Gets Update
    This week Grafana Labs announced the 6.2 release of its Grafana open source analytics platform...
  • Mozilla Revamps WebThings, its Open Source IoT
    Mozilla recently released its open source IoT platform, formerly called Project Things, as WebThings. Mozilla WebThings brings a series of logging, alarm, and networking features. Mozilla WebThings is an open source implementation of emerging Web of Things standards at the W3C. W3C Web of Things is an initiative that aims to reduce the IoT fragmentation, through the recently launched Web of Things Working Group. W3C started to develop the initial standards for the Web of Things, aiming to reduce the costs of development, lessen the risks to both investors and customers, and encourage exponential growth in the market for IoT devices and services.
  • WELL Health Acquires Ontario Open Source EMR OSCARprn for $876k
    WELL Health Technologies Corp. (“WELL”), a Vancouver, Canada-based company focused on consolidating and modernizing clinical and digital assets within the primary healthcare sector has acquired Ontario-based EMR provider OSCARprn – Treatments Solutions Ltd. OSCARprn is a trusted provider of EMR software, support and other services that work with OSCAR, an open source EMR platform developed by McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario.
  • Carnegie Mellon’s Massive Open Source Initiative – Interview With the Leader Behind It
    In March, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) announced an unprecedented initiative. Over the course of the year, they plan to release dozens of digital learning tools they have developed over the past decade on an open-source license. These include the learning analytics platform LearnSphere and their pioneering adaptive learning project the Open Learning Initiative (OLI). In all, CMU estimates $100 million in grants and university funding went into these efforts. The effort was spearheaded by the Simon Initiative, which continues the legacy of Nobel Laureate, Turing Award recipient, and CMU professor Herbert Simon.
  • iXsystems TrueNAS brings Open Source Economics to VMware vSphere [Ed: A BSD company is hooking up with a majot GPL violator]
  • André Laperrière: Executive Director at Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition
    Andre Laperrière is executive director at the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN) an initiative aiming to exchange ideas and knowledge to solve the world's looming food crisis
  • Open-source gene expression platform could yield more efficient food, biofuel crops
    An open-source RNA analysis platform has been successfully used on plant cells for the first time — a breakthrough that could herald a new era of fundamental research and bolster efforts to engineer more efficient food and biofuel crop plants. The technology, called Drop-seq, is a method for measuring the RNA present in individual cells, allowing scientists to see what genes are being expressed and how this relates to the specific functions of different cell types …. [T]he freely shared protocol had previously only been used in animal cells.

Open Hardware: Adafruit Feather and Stanford Doggo

  • Feather Plus Blackberry Equals Open Source Fauxberry
    The keyboard is a superior means of input, but to date no one has really figured out how to make a keyboard for small, handheld electronics. You could use tact switches, but that’s annoying, or you could use a touch screen. The best option we’ve seen is actually a Blackberry keyboard, and [arturo182] has the best example yet. It’s a small handheld device with a screen, keyboard, and WiFi that’s ready to do anything imaginable. Think of it as an Open Source Fauxberry. In any case, we want it. This project is actually a breakout board of sorts for the Adafruit Feather system, and therefore has support for WiFi, cellular, or pretty much any other networking of connectivity. To this blank canvas, [arturo] added an accelerator/magnetometer sensor, a single Neopixel, and of course the beautiful Blackberry keyboard. This keyboard is attached to an ATSAMD20G, a microcontroller with a whole bunch of I/O that translates key presses into I2C for the Feather.
  • Students from Stanford's Robotics Club Releases Open-Source Robo-Dog Online
    Robotics isn't cheap by any means, and no one knows this better than the students of the Extreme Mobility Team of Standford University's Robotics Club (SEMT). The materials used by university robotics clubs can cost upwards of tens of thousands of dollars, making it that much harder for many high schools and less well-funded colleges and universities to invest heavily in this important field of research.
  • Watch this open-source dog robot do backflips [Ed: This is more likely to be used in military rather than in aeronautics and astronautics (luxury of the rich)]
    “We’re hoping to provide a baseline system that anyone could build,” says Patrick Slade, graduate student in aeronautics and astronautics and mentor for Extreme Mobility.
  • Meet Doggo: Stanford’s cute open-source four-legged robot
    Doggo follows similar designs to other small quadrupedal robots, but what makes it unique is its low cost and accessibility. While comparable bots can cost tens of thousands of dollars, the creators of Doggo — Stanford’s Extreme Mobility lab — estimate its total cost to be less than $3,000. What’s more, the design is completely open source, meaning anyone can print off the plans and assemble a Doggo of their very own.
  • Stanford Students Built This Adorable, Bouncy, Open-Source Robot Dog
    Nearly all of the parts used to create Doggo were bought intact through the internet, while the rest can be easily 3D-printed. The total costs involved in building Doggo—including shipping and handling—amounted to less than $3,000, Kau and his team claim. Via the website Github, the team has also released all of the relevant information you would need to create your Doggo, including software coding, supply list, and manual instructions. From there, any enterprising roboticist could tweak the design to create an even more capable Doggo.

Programming: JavaScript, Perl, Python and C++

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Knockout
    This week’s open-source project is Knockout (KO) and it works purely on JavaScript. KO is a JavaScript MVVM (a modern variant of MVC) library that enables developers to create rich, desktop-like user interfaces with JavaScript and HTML. KO uses “observers” that help the UI stay in sync with an underlying data model and declarative bindings to enable productive development, according to Knockout’s page on GitHub.
  • Why I love Perl 6

    love Perl 6 because, if that solution seems too scary to you (too infinite, too lazy, too concurrent, too pipelined, too Unicoded, too declarative, too functional, too much like something that an Erlang guru would code), then Perl 6 will equally allow you to write a plain and simple version: one that's imperative, iterative, block structured, variable-driven, pure ASCII, and more-or-less exactly what you'd write in Perl 5, or even in C: [...]

  • Python's creator thinks it has a diversity problem [Ed: Python has Microsoft entryism problems (far more urgent than this)]
  • Evennia: Creating Evscaperoom, part 1
  • Evennia: Creating Evscaperoom, part 2
  • Dissecting boost::astar_search
    Right now, I am having a hard time understanding BGL’s (the Boost Graph Library) template spaghetti, so decided to write a blogpost while I decipher it, one at a time, documenting the whole thing along the way.
  • KTextEditor/Kate Bugs – Scratch Your Own Itch