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Sunday, 26 May 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Motorola smartwatch does Android Wear in the round Rianne Schestowitz 19/03/2014 - 5:18pm
Story Qualcomm's Liat Ben-Zur: Open Source Collaboration Works Roy Schestowitz 19/03/2014 - 5:18pm
Story Recapping The Top Changes Of The Linux 3.14 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 19/03/2014 - 4:21pm
Story Ministry of Communication adopts open source software strategy Rianne Schestowitz 19/03/2014 - 4:14pm
Story KDE Works On Input Redirection, Wayland Cursor Themes Rianne Schestowitz 19/03/2014 - 12:15pm
Story SDN, NFV, and open source: the operator’s view Rianne Schestowitz 19/03/2014 - 12:09pm
Story ownCloud @ Chemnitzer Linuxtage 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 19/03/2014 - 12:05pm
Story Tux Takeover: GOG.com Adding Linux Games Roy Schestowitz 19/03/2014 - 9:53am
Story Ubuntu Gnome gets LTS status Roy Schestowitz 19/03/2014 - 8:50am
Story Enlightenment Foundation Libraries Application Round Up Roy Schestowitz 19/03/2014 - 8:38am

Gentoo 2005.0 All About Security

Filed under
Gentoo
Reviews

Sean Michael Kerner has written up a nice article on internetnews.com about Gentoo 2005.0 with quotes from Chris Gianelloni including future plans for embedded devices and such. A nice read.

Cingular, AT&T Wireless ring up most complaints

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Cingular Wireless and Redmond-based AT&T Wireless, which merged late last year to form the nation's largest cellular carrier, together had the worst complaint record in 2004, according to information obtained by Consumers Union and released yesterday.

Spam King bankrupted by Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
Legal

A Colorado company sued by Microsoft Corp. under anti-spam laws has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

At a Glance: MGM v. Grokster

Filed under
Web
Legal

On March 29, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. v. Grokster Ltd., a landmark case that specifically addresses the legality of peer-to-peer Internet file-sharing services, but has broad implications for any technology that could potentially be used to infringe on copyrighted materials.

Opteron Memory Timings Tested

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

When building any modern computer, the choice of which memory to use is a major consideration. After all, why spend a mint on the latest CPU and motherboard, only to slow it down a bit with anything but the best memory available?

Nvidia working on 90 series of drivers

Filed under
Software

WE LEARNED that Nvidia is working on a fresh set of drivers codenamed series 90. The company just released its 70 series of drivers that brought features such as Pure Video and better SLI compatibility.

Safety Cheat Sheet

Filed under
Security
Web

If people didn't fall for online scams, online scammers would take up another line of work. And really, it isn't terribly hard to protect yourself. If you do one thing today, print out the following list and tape it to your computer.

This Week's Movies: Hostage and Cursed

Filed under
Movies
Reviews
-s

When siblings discover they are now werewolves, they must look deep inside and to each other to save themselves from the returning monster and being "Cursed".

"Hostage" negotiator Jeff Talley must once again try and talk young criminals into releasing a family before anyone get hurts. Only this time there's more at stake than just strangers.

First Details on Next-Gen UT

Filed under
Gaming

The May 2005 issue of Computer Gaming World magazine contains the first screenshots and information on the next, Unreal Engine 3 powered Unreal Tournament game, including incredible revelations about the massive new Conquest gametype.

Game Rush hosts Doom 3 midnight sale

Filed under
Gaming

Members of Texas-based id software, Doom3's developer, will be on hand at the Game Rush store, Blockbuster's gaming branch, on 6437 Hillcrest Avenue in Dallas to meet fans, sign autographs, and give away Doom 3-related merchandise.

Stolen laptop exposes data of 100,000

Filed under
Security

A thief recently walked into a University of California, Berkeley office and swiped a computer laptop containing personal information about nearly 100,000 alumni, graduate students and past applicants, highlighting a continued lack of security that has increased society's vulnerability to identity theft.

n/a

Firm beats Intel to 10Gbit CMOS photonics chip

Filed under
Hardware

A CALIFORNIA FIRM claimed that it has put a fibre optic interface directly onto a silicon chip. That means, according to Luxtera, that one day we'll have CPUs with optical buses shuffling huge amounts of data in and out of the heap.

Legal row over iTunes domain name

Filed under
Web
Legal

An internet entrepreneur is taking legal action against computer giant Apple over the iTunes domain name.

ISPs join to 'fingerprint' Internet attacks

Filed under
Security
Web

Leading global telecommunications companies, Internet service providers and network operators will begin sharing information on Internet attacks as members of a new group called the Fingerprint Sharing Alliance, according to a published statement from the new group.

howto: put linux on a zipit handheld

Filed under
Linux

aibohack of all places has come up with quite an interesting hack. turns out someone actually can make good use of the $100 zipit instant messaging device. Installing Linux.

IRS may consider eBay sales taxable income

Filed under
Web

In tax law, there is no clear, bright line that separates fun from profit, or a hobby from a business. But IRS instructions make it clear that all income - a category that includes bribes, gambling winnings, kickbacks and money made in illegal activities - can be taxed.

You Get What You Pay For

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Security

Purely objective information about security issues is becoming one of the scarcest commodities in the tech industry.

Teen Builds Linux Workaround For iTunes

Filed under
Linux

Cody Brocious is a 17-year old 11th grader from Chamberburg, Pa. likes using the Linux operating system more than he does Microsoft's Windows or Apple Computer's Mac OS. But Apple doesn't make software that would let Linux users like Brocious buy songs from the iTunes store, so he did what any 21st-century teen raised in the digital age would do--he and his friends wrote a program to do so themselves.

Linux consortium gets valley boost

Filed under
Linux

Silicon Graphics Inc. of Mountain View, which makes computers for the likes of scientists and graphic artists, is becoming an industry sponsor for the federation, an international research consortium with the mission of advancing open source software in the form of the Linux OS Intel Itanium 2 platform.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

  • The Power Of Open Source AI
    he open source software movement produced iconic innovations like the Firefox web browser, Apache server software and the Linux operating system—the genesis of the Android OS that currently powers 86% of the world’s smartphones. It also fostered a mindset around continuous improvement of tools that can be collaboratively shared, improved upon and distributed.
  • Apache Dubbo, the Java-based open source RPC framework becomes a Top-Level Project
    The Apache Software Foundation announced that the Java-based open source RPC framework used by giants like Alibaba, Apache Dubbo, is now a Top-Level Project. Let’s have a look at what this framework is all about. Apache Dubbo is a high-performance, Java-based Remote Procedure Call framework that has been in use at more than 150 companies, including giants like Alibaba Group or the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China. The Dubbo project was originally developed at Alibaba and open-sourced in 2011. It entered the Apache Incubator in February 2018 and the Apache Software Foundation announced that Dubbo is now a Top-Level Project!
  • Bridging divides with open source
    Application delivery is changing. At the risk of using buzzwords, it is being transformed – digitally. Continuous delivery has become the norm for DevOps (71 per cent plan on implementing, according to a study conducted by F5 and RedHat – NetOps Meets DevOps: The State of Network Automation), and continuous deployment must follow if business is to succeed in the era of Application Capital. While 73 per cent of organisations plan on pursuing continuous deployment, nearly half of them have yet to begin. A staggering 42 per cent have yet to automate a single component of the continuous deployment pipeline (according to a study conducted by F5 and RedHat – NetOps Meets DevOps: The State of Network Automation). [...] Applications themselves are mainly developed today from third-party components, a majority of them open source. Application infrastructure is increasingly built from open source components. From web servers to app servers, databases to ingress control, messaging to container runtimes and orchestration. IT operations are driven by open source tools like Puppet, Chef, Terraform, Helm, Kubernetes, and Ansible. These technologies are adopted because they answer multiple challenges: fast, frequent delivery and deployment along with a frictionless business model. They also encourage collaboration and innovation when entire organisations move to standardise on open source-based operations. None of that is possible without the passionate communities of developers who work tirelessly to improve their open source solutions. At F5, we appreciate the value of such communities. In a comparable example, our DevCentral community is based on collaborative innovation, guided by many of the same principles that drive open source projects. Code sharing and knowledge transfers across the community help the hundreds of thousands of members innovate and create new capabilities for our BIG-IP platform. With those solutions come new extensions, plug-ins, and libraries for open source projects like Puppet and Chef and node.js.
  • Open Source Analytics Platform Grafana Gets Update
    This week Grafana Labs announced the 6.2 release of its Grafana open source analytics platform...
  • Mozilla Revamps WebThings, its Open Source IoT
    Mozilla recently released its open source IoT platform, formerly called Project Things, as WebThings. Mozilla WebThings brings a series of logging, alarm, and networking features. Mozilla WebThings is an open source implementation of emerging Web of Things standards at the W3C. W3C Web of Things is an initiative that aims to reduce the IoT fragmentation, through the recently launched Web of Things Working Group. W3C started to develop the initial standards for the Web of Things, aiming to reduce the costs of development, lessen the risks to both investors and customers, and encourage exponential growth in the market for IoT devices and services.
  • WELL Health Acquires Ontario Open Source EMR OSCARprn for $876k
    WELL Health Technologies Corp. (“WELL”), a Vancouver, Canada-based company focused on consolidating and modernizing clinical and digital assets within the primary healthcare sector has acquired Ontario-based EMR provider OSCARprn – Treatments Solutions Ltd. OSCARprn is a trusted provider of EMR software, support and other services that work with OSCAR, an open source EMR platform developed by McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario.
  • Carnegie Mellon’s Massive Open Source Initiative – Interview With the Leader Behind It
    In March, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) announced an unprecedented initiative. Over the course of the year, they plan to release dozens of digital learning tools they have developed over the past decade on an open-source license. These include the learning analytics platform LearnSphere and their pioneering adaptive learning project the Open Learning Initiative (OLI). In all, CMU estimates $100 million in grants and university funding went into these efforts. The effort was spearheaded by the Simon Initiative, which continues the legacy of Nobel Laureate, Turing Award recipient, and CMU professor Herbert Simon.
  • iXsystems TrueNAS brings Open Source Economics to VMware vSphere [Ed: A BSD company is hooking up with a majot GPL violator]
  • André Laperrière: Executive Director at Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition
    Andre Laperrière is executive director at the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN) an initiative aiming to exchange ideas and knowledge to solve the world's looming food crisis
  • Open-source gene expression platform could yield more efficient food, biofuel crops
    An open-source RNA analysis platform has been successfully used on plant cells for the first time — a breakthrough that could herald a new era of fundamental research and bolster efforts to engineer more efficient food and biofuel crop plants. The technology, called Drop-seq, is a method for measuring the RNA present in individual cells, allowing scientists to see what genes are being expressed and how this relates to the specific functions of different cell types …. [T]he freely shared protocol had previously only been used in animal cells.

Open Hardware: Adafruit Feather and Stanford Doggo

  • Feather Plus Blackberry Equals Open Source Fauxberry
    The keyboard is a superior means of input, but to date no one has really figured out how to make a keyboard for small, handheld electronics. You could use tact switches, but that’s annoying, or you could use a touch screen. The best option we’ve seen is actually a Blackberry keyboard, and [arturo182] has the best example yet. It’s a small handheld device with a screen, keyboard, and WiFi that’s ready to do anything imaginable. Think of it as an Open Source Fauxberry. In any case, we want it. This project is actually a breakout board of sorts for the Adafruit Feather system, and therefore has support for WiFi, cellular, or pretty much any other networking of connectivity. To this blank canvas, [arturo] added an accelerator/magnetometer sensor, a single Neopixel, and of course the beautiful Blackberry keyboard. This keyboard is attached to an ATSAMD20G, a microcontroller with a whole bunch of I/O that translates key presses into I2C for the Feather.
  • Students from Stanford's Robotics Club Releases Open-Source Robo-Dog Online
    Robotics isn't cheap by any means, and no one knows this better than the students of the Extreme Mobility Team of Standford University's Robotics Club (SEMT). The materials used by university robotics clubs can cost upwards of tens of thousands of dollars, making it that much harder for many high schools and less well-funded colleges and universities to invest heavily in this important field of research.
  • Watch this open-source dog robot do backflips [Ed: This is more likely to be used in military rather than in aeronautics and astronautics (luxury of the rich)]
    “We’re hoping to provide a baseline system that anyone could build,” says Patrick Slade, graduate student in aeronautics and astronautics and mentor for Extreme Mobility.
  • Meet Doggo: Stanford’s cute open-source four-legged robot
    Doggo follows similar designs to other small quadrupedal robots, but what makes it unique is its low cost and accessibility. While comparable bots can cost tens of thousands of dollars, the creators of Doggo — Stanford’s Extreme Mobility lab — estimate its total cost to be less than $3,000. What’s more, the design is completely open source, meaning anyone can print off the plans and assemble a Doggo of their very own.
  • Stanford Students Built This Adorable, Bouncy, Open-Source Robot Dog
    Nearly all of the parts used to create Doggo were bought intact through the internet, while the rest can be easily 3D-printed. The total costs involved in building Doggo—including shipping and handling—amounted to less than $3,000, Kau and his team claim. Via the website Github, the team has also released all of the relevant information you would need to create your Doggo, including software coding, supply list, and manual instructions. From there, any enterprising roboticist could tweak the design to create an even more capable Doggo.

Programming: JavaScript, Perl, Python and C++

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Knockout
    This week’s open-source project is Knockout (KO) and it works purely on JavaScript. KO is a JavaScript MVVM (a modern variant of MVC) library that enables developers to create rich, desktop-like user interfaces with JavaScript and HTML. KO uses “observers” that help the UI stay in sync with an underlying data model and declarative bindings to enable productive development, according to Knockout’s page on GitHub.
  • Why I love Perl 6

    love Perl 6 because, if that solution seems too scary to you (too infinite, too lazy, too concurrent, too pipelined, too Unicoded, too declarative, too functional, too much like something that an Erlang guru would code), then Perl 6 will equally allow you to write a plain and simple version: one that's imperative, iterative, block structured, variable-driven, pure ASCII, and more-or-less exactly what you'd write in Perl 5, or even in C: [...]

  • Python's creator thinks it has a diversity problem [Ed: Python has Microsoft entryism problems (far more urgent than this)]
  • Evennia: Creating Evscaperoom, part 1
  • Evennia: Creating Evscaperoom, part 2
  • Dissecting boost::astar_search
    Right now, I am having a hard time understanding BGL’s (the Boost Graph Library) template spaghetti, so decided to write a blogpost while I decipher it, one at a time, documenting the whole thing along the way.
  • KTextEditor/Kate Bugs – Scratch Your Own Itch