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Thursday, 19 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Queue Up Linux Printing

Filed under
Hardware

If I had to give a general summation of printing in Linux I would have to say "better than dismal, but not much." Hardware vendors barely produce tolerable drivers for Windows, let alone us weirdo hippie Linux users.

Microsoft's FAT patents threaten Linux, say critics

Filed under
Linux

The US Patent Office has upheld Microsoft patents for a system that helps an operating system locate and retrieve files from a storage device. Some believe this will cause problems for Linux vendors and users, because Linux uses the same system. Microsoft surely intended to use its patents to fight the competitive threat posed by free software.

2006 phish tales, part 1: Worse on Linux or Windows?

Filed under
Security

Phisher phobia has gripped IT users and administrators, thanks to some highly publicized phishing successes -- and some users and admins should be more worried than others. But phishers can be beaten, says Lance James, author of the new book, Phishing Exposed.

Patch this! Musings on Microsoft's Windows patching

Filed under
Microsoft

Everyone has security problems, everyone has patches. But claiming, as Hilf does, that Microsoft's patching is somehow better than that of the major Linux distributions is complete nonsense.

Why Not Python?, Part 2

Filed under
HowTos

This time out, the old C hacker drags himself into the 1990s to solve Sudoku puzzles. Have you ever see a puzzle that made you want to write a program to solve it? I had that feeling a few months ago, when I noticed Sudoku in our local paper.

Mandriva Linux 2006.1-0.3 (Beta): a Bad Joke?!

Filed under
MDV

The public beta of Mandriva Linux 2006.1 (0.3) for x86 (32-bit), released on Dec. 26, looked appalling to me. It's supposed to come with a lot of improvements. I was very interested on the progress Mandriva's having on the GNOME part, albeit it's primarily a KDE distro.

An introduction to services, runlevels, and rc.d scripts

Filed under
HowTos

What's the first thing that you do once you've logged onto Linux? Is it to manually start up a processes such as Apache or MySQL, or even start your network connection? Or do you have to stop applications that have started up without your telling them to, and which are overloading your machine? If you have unwanted processes starting at boot time, or find yourself starting necessary services manually, let's make your life a little bit easier by introducing you the world of Linux services.

January '06 Processors: Everyone's Going Dual-Core

Filed under
Hardware

It's been about 6 months since our last big desktop processor review (July '05: Battle of the High-End CPUs), but here we are at another big release from both Intel and AMD. In this review we'll be taking a look at the new big dogs from both companies. This time they're laying it all down and going for the highest clocked dual-core processors they can pump out.

ColdFusion 7.x Installation on Debian Sarge

Filed under
HowTos

As you know Debian Linux is not supported officialy by Adobe. But Debian is one of the mosts used and well known Linux distribition for specially server usage and I think there would be some other people who wants to use Debian and ColdFusion together.

Xfce 4.2 - A light weight window manager heavy in features.

Filed under
Reviews

The first time I used Xfce was when I tried out the Belenix Live CD. Xfce was the only window manager bundled with it so I had no choice but to use it though my personal preference was Fluxbox. But after playing around in it for some time, I just couldn't stop admiring the usability and design of Xfce as well as the responsiveness of the applications when run in it.

USPTO upholds Microsoft FAT patents

Filed under
Microsoft

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has upheld two Microsoft patents for technology that controls how files are stored in the Windows OS, according to a Microsoft spokeswoman.

March of the penguins

Filed under
Linux

Although having an open-source strategy is becoming common in many enterprises, users and analysts say 2006 is the year the penguin flippers will hit the water in terms of Linux's evolution into an enterprise application server platform.

25 Reasons to Convert to Linux

Filed under
Linux

Businesses, educational institutions, governmental agencies and other organizations around the world are converting1 their computer operating systems from Microsoft Windows to Linux at an increasing pace. There are at least 25 reasons for this.

Homeland Security helps secure open-source code

Filed under
Misc

Through its Science and Technology Directorate, the department has given $1.24 million in funding to Stanford University, Coverity and Symantec to hunt for security bugs in open-source software and to improve Coverity's commercial tool for source code analysis.

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Stx Linux 1.0 Final Look

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Stx Linux is a small lightweight operating system for the x86 arch. It is based on Slackware and slackware derivatives. One of the key features of Stx is it's ability to perform admirably on older hardware, and it's minimum requirements are a pentium 1 with 32 mb ram. Tuxmachines has covered some of the developmental releases, RC2 and RC3, but since final was released today, we felt it deserved yet another look. Today we'll look at an upgrade as well as a fresh install.

PostgreSQL issues 'critical' security fix

Filed under
Security

The developers of the open-source PostgreSQL database have issued a "critical" update, urging users of the software to modify their installations immediately to protect themselves from possible exploits.

Mono to Be Included in Fedora Core 5

Filed under
Software

The Mono open-source development platform based on .Net will be in the next version of the Fedora core Linux distribution. Fedora Core is a Linux distribution derived from Red Hat Linux and developed by the Fedora Project, which is sponsored by Red Hat.

Linux Certs Gaining Popularity Among IT Pros

Filed under
Linux

The value and popularity of IT certifications are tied to supply and demand, said John Challenger, CEO of IT outsourcing and jobs analysis firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. There is no question that after Microsoft and Cisco certifications, the next most important certs are for Linux.

Novell to shield Linux users

Filed under
Linux

A new security offering could help users of the open source OS keep their applications from misbehaving.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian: CUPS, LTS and Archival

  • Praise Be CUPS Driverless Printing

    Last Tuesday, I finally got to start updating $work's many desktop computers to Debian Buster. I use Puppet to manage them remotely, so major upgrades basically mean reinstalling machines from scratch and running Puppet. Over the years, the main upgrade hurdle has always been making our very large and very complicated printers work on Debian. Unsurprisingly, the blog posts I have written on that topic are very popular and get me a few 'thank you' emails per month. I'm very happy to say, thanks to CUPS Driverless Printing (CUPS 2.2.2+), all those trials and tribulations are finally over. Printing on Buster just works. Yes yes, even color booklets printed on 11x17 paper folded in 3 stapled in the middle.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: Archiving 20 years of online content

    mailman2 is pretty great. You can get a dump of an email list pretty easily and mailman3's web frontend, the lovely hyperkitty, is well, lovely. Importing a legacy mailman2 mbox went without a hitch thanks to the awesome hyperkitty_import importer. Kudos to the Debian Mailman Team for packaging this in Debian for us. But what about cramming a Yahoo! Group mailing list in hyperkitty? I wouldn't recommend it. After way too many hours spent battling character encoding errors I just decided people that wanted to read obscure emails from 2003 would have to deal with broken accents and shit. But hey, it kinda works! Oh, and yes, archiving a Yahoo! Group with an old borken Perl script wasn't an easy task. Hell, I kept getting blacklisted by Yahoo! for scraping too much data to their liking. I ended up patching together the results of multiple runs over a few weeks to get the full mbox and attachments. By the way, if anyone knows how to tell hyperkitty to stop at a certain year (i.e. not display links for 2019 when the list stopped in 2006), please ping me.

Running The AMD "ABBA" Ryzen 3000 Boost Fix Under Linux With 140 Tests

Last week AMD's AGESA "ABBA" update began shipping with a fix to how the boost clock frequencies are handled in hopes of better achieving the rated boost frequencies for Ryzen 3000 series processors. I've been running some tests of an updated ASUS BIOS with this adjusted boost clock behavior to see how it performs under Linux with a Ryzen 9 3900X processor. The AGESA 1.0.0.3 ABBA update has an improved boost clock frequency algorithm along with changes to the idle state handling. This AGESA update should better position AMD Ryzen 3000 processors with the boost clock behavior expected by users with better hitting the maximum boost frequency and doing so more aggressively. Read more

Stable kernels 5.2.16, 4.19.74, and 4.14.145

  • Linux 5.2.16
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.2.16 kernel. All users of the 5.2 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.2.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.2.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
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Linux Container Technology Explained (Contributed)

State and local governments’ IT departments increasingly rely on DevOps practices and agile development methodologies to improve service delivery and to help maintain a culture of constant collaboration, iteration, and flexibility among all stakeholders and teams. However, when an IT department adopts agile and DevOps practices and methodologies, traditional IT problems still need to be solved. One long-standing problem is “environmental drift,” when the code and configurations for applications and their underlying infrastructure can vary between different environments. State and local IT teams often lack the tools necessary to mitigate the effects of environmental drift, which can hamper collaboration and agility efforts. Read more