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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 16 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ARM moves to open-source compiler Roy Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 9:39pm
Story Fedora Linux Plans Changes for Open Source OS Roy Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 9:29pm
Story Is cloud computing about to get cheaper because of Linux? Roy Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 9:26pm
Story OSI Board Changes 2014 Roy Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 9:24pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 7:41pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.12.17 LTS Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 7:20pm
Story Forget About Windows XP, Tranform Your Linux Mint in Windows 7 Rianne Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 7:09pm
Story Upcoming Btrfs Features for Linux Containers Rianne Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 7:05pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 6:57pm
Story Ultimate Edition 3.9 Linux Distro Is a Complete Mess Rianne Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 6:57pm

9/11 babies inherit stress

Filed under
Misc

Pregnant women traumatised by the World Trade Center attacks may have passed a susceptibility to stress on to their newborn babies, researchers say.

Microsoft is reacting to the market

Filed under
Microsoft

In 2002, Linux, the source code for which is freely available to anyone, became the key operating system for IBM servers. But what began as a move to rupture Microsoft's monopoly has become a passion of sorts for IBM.

Spyware industry worth billions

Filed under
Security

Despite reductions in the number of computers infected by spyware applications, the troublesome software has created a billion-dollar industry that continues to plague both consumers and businesses, researchers said on Tuesday.

eWeek Interviews Sa^H^HGates

Filed under
Microsoft

At last week's WinHEC (Windows Hardware Engineering Conference) in Seattle, Microsoft Chairman and Chief Software Architect Bill Gates sat down with eWEEK Senior Editor Peter Galli to talk about 64-bit computing and what's ahead for the Windows platform in the upcoming decade.

Online Cannabis Dealers Jailed

Filed under
Web
Legal

Three members of a drug dealing ring who used the internet to sell cannabis to addresses across the UK were sent to prison last week.

TV Limits Copies

Filed under
Misc

The FCC's new broadcast flag will restrict your ability to copy and share your favorite digital television shows and movies.

Time Warner Loses Employee Info

Filed under
Security

Media giant Time Warner said Monday that it lost a container of computer backup tapes with information on 600,000 current and former employees.

China's largest bank switches to Linux

Filed under
Linux

The deal marks the largest Linux deployment in China; ICBC has $640bn in total assets and over 20,000 branch offices across the country.

SANS Releases List Of Security Flaws

Filed under
Security

According to a SANS Institute report outlining more than 600 new Internet security vulnerabilities, some of the most commonly affected software include Microsoft Internet Explorer, Windows Media Player, Messenger, and MSN Messenger, Microsoft Windows XP SP1 and 2, Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 and 4 and Windows Server 2003. <Shock!>

Rampant piracy lands China on 'watch list'

Filed under
Misc

The Bush administration has placed China on a "priority watch list" for allegedly not doing enough to protect intellectual property rights.

Apple's Stock Not Roaring

Filed under
Mac

Apple Computer may have let its Tiger loose from its cage, but its stock price certainly isn't roaring.

Police chief battered by cyber attack

Filed under
Security

A UK police chief has been bombarded with thousands of threatening emails in a denial of service attack aimed at crippling his force's computer systems.

Kickin the Tires: Taking PC-BSD for a Spin

Filed under
Reviews
BSD
-s

PC-BSD 0.6 was released yesterday, May 01, and I decided to take it for a test drive. With no prior bsd or unix experience, I had PC-BSD booted and taking screenshots in less than an hour. I wish I could say it was because "I'm just that good!", but no, PC-BSD made it that easy.

GCC 4.0 A Review for AMD and Intel Processors

Filed under
Software
Reviews

If any one piece of software is the foundation of Free Software, it is the GNU Compiler Collection. The release of version 4.0 in mid-April brings many changes and new features. In this review, I compare the newly-released 4.0 with 3.4.3, using a few real world applications in C and C++.

Mandriva LE 2005 Uploaded

Filed under
MDV

A little birdie told me that the Mandriva isos are being uploaded to ftp mirrors.

More on this as it becomes available.

UPDATE: Tho not officially announced, the isos are fully loaded on several ftp mirrors. One of which is carroll.cac.psu.edu.

Linux Users Have Had Enough...Here We Come

Filed under
Linux

WE push a product or pull it. Sure, they advertise like hell and try to sway us this way or that...but the ultimate choice lies with US...you and I. The ball is in our court.

Hackers aren't just picking on Microsoft - study

Filed under
Security

While hackers continued to poke new holes in Microsoft Corp.'s popular Windows operating system, they increasingly exploited flaws in software made by other companies as well, the nonprofit SANS Institute found.

n/a

Apple's Tiger vs. Windows XP 64-Bit Edition vs. Linux

Filed under
OS

With servers, where there is a good economic model, Linux would clearly remain favored over Apple because of much deeper support from companies like HP and IBM. But on the desktop, for most users, Tiger is the clear winner. It has better desktop application bundles, better customer support, better hardware, good value and is easier to use.

First Look at a Distro Changed: Mandriva LE 2005

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

If there is indeed a desktop Linux market, Mandrake Linux was one of the founding fathers, and up until their recent purchase of Conectiva Linux (and subsequent name change to Mandriva), they've reigned right along side other big-name contenders such as Novell/SUSE, Red Hat, Linspire, and Xandros... and you know what? They've done damn well, even surviving near extinction at one point when they filed "declaration de cessation des paiements" which is the French equivalent of Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the USA. How does the future of their desktop look? Stick around. We're about to find out.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development Leftovers

Openwashing Leftovers/New Examples

Kernel and Linux Foundation in Pockets of Proprietary Software Vendors

  • AT&T, Nokia open up the radio’s edge to third party apps [Ed: Openwashing to dominate the standards and interfaces (with patents) through the "Linux" Foundation]
    AT&T and Nokia have developed a radio edge cloud (REC) appliance that the two companies plan to release into open source via the Linux Foundation. The REC will make it possible for third parties to develop apps and get access to the radio access network (RAN). [...] Murphy said that it is not easy to predict all the use cases for REC but added that having an open source edge cloud with open interfaces to the RAN control will allow operators to have more options.
  • Accord Project to develop open source framework for smart legal contracts [Ed: They're promoting and spreading proprietary software and proprietary formats of Microsoft]
    One of the main purposes of Accord Project is, therefore, to provide a vendor-neutral “.doc” format for smart legal agreements.
  • Apple joins the open-source Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Apple, in typical fashion, isn’t commenting on the announcement, but the CNCF notes that end-user memberships are meant for organizations that are “heavy users of open source cloud native technologies” and that are looking to give back to the community. By becoming a CNCF end-user member, companies also join the Linux Foundation .
  • Linux stable tree mirror at github [Ed: Greg Kroah-Hartman giving Microsoft more control over Linux]
    It differs from Linus’s tree at: https://github.com/torvalds/linux in that it contains all of the different stable tree branches and stable releases and tags, which many devices end up building on top of. So, mirror away! Also note, this is a read-only mirror, any pull requests created on it will be gleefully ignored, just like happens on Linus’s github mirror. If people think this is needed on any other git hosting site, just let me know and I will be glad to push to other places as well.

Security Leftovers

  • Industry Watch: Of open source, data breaches and speed [Ed: And proprietary software is a lot less suitable for security and privacy purposes because there are surveillance 'features' disguised and back doors too]
    Open-source software helps developers work faster and smarter, as they don’t have to ‘re-invent the wheel’ every time create an application. They just need to be sure the license attached to that software allows them to use the component the way they want. They also need to stay on top of that application, so if the component changes, or an API changes, their application isn’t affected and they are still in compliance. Data protection is also something organizations must get serious about. While the GDPR only affects users in the European Union, it’s only a matter of time before those or similar regulations are in place in the U.S. and elsewhere. Companies should get a jump on that by doing a thorough audit of their data, to know they are prepared to be compliant with whatever comes down from the statehouses or from Washington, D.C. On the speed side, the benefits of Agile and DevOps are clear. These methodologies enable companies to bring new software products to market faster, with the result of getting a jump on the competition, working more efficiently and ultimately serving your customers. Unfortunately, these efforts are usually done by different teams of developers, database administrators and security experts. If the Equifax and Facebook breaches have taught us anything, it’s that you can’t expect developers to be security experts, and you can’t expect DB admins to understand the ramifications on the business when data is misunderstood. It will take a coordinated approach to IT to achieve business goals while not leaving the company — and its IP and PII data — exposed.
  • VLC patches critical flaws through EU open source bug bounty program
    More than 30 security issues have been fixed in VLC, the popular open source media player, with developers praising an EU-funded bug bounty program for helping produce its most secure update yet. VLC media player, created by the software non-profit VideoLAN, was found to have 33 vulnerabilities within various versions, including two that were considered critical. An out-of-bounds write was one of the severe vulnerabilities found to affect all VLC versions, and a stack buffer overflow was also discovered in VLC 4.0. Less severe vulnerabilities consisted of out-of-band reads, heap overflows, NULL-dereference, and use-after-free bugs. An updated version, VLC 3.0.7, has since been released for users to download.
  • VLC Player Gets Patched for Two High Severity Bugs
  • Asigra FreeNAS plugin brings open source data protection [Ed: Some openwashing of proprietary software]
    Asigra is trying to capture FreeNAS users with a free-to-try plugin version of its backup software. The Asigra FreeNAS plugin released this week allows customers to turn their iXsystems FreeNAS storage systems into backup targets. It encrypts and deduplicates data before it is sent to the FreeNAS system. The plugin also detects and quarantines malware and ransomware so that it doesn't get backed up.
  • TrueCommand Brings Single Pane of Glass Management to TrueNAS and FreeNAS Fleets
  • WSO2 and Ping Identity Partner to Provide Comprehensive, AI-Powered Cyber-Attack Protection for APIs
  • The Open Source Cookbook: A Baker’s Guide to Modern Application Development
    Let’s begin our cookbook by selecting our recipe. I’ve had some phenomenal baked goods, and I’ve had some not-so-phenomenal baked goods (there is rarely a bad baked good). But I’ve been surprised before, by a croissant from a diner that didn’t taste like the one from the local French bakery, or by a buttercream frosting at a supermarket that just didn’t have the same delicate touch as the one I make at home. In each case, I expected the same as I had before – by title – yet encountered a much different experience. When selecting your recipes, it’s important to understand which type of a particular food you are expecting to make, or you may be met with a different taste when you finish than you were hoping for when you began. [...] As with cooking, when incorporating open source components into applications, it’s important to understand origin and evolution of what you’re baking into your software. Carefully review your open source component versions, and evaluate the community’s activity in order to have the greatest chance possible to predict the possible technical debt you may inherit.