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Wednesday, 21 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Nexuiz 1.2.1 released

Filed under
Gaming

A new version of Nexuiz was released yesterday. Old clients won't work properly with 1.2.1 servers - so make sure to update your copy. You won't regret! There is a full download and patches for Nexuiz 1.1 and 1.2 - each download supports Windows, Linux and MacOS X.

Review: aLinux 12.5

Filed under
Reviews

aLinux, formerly known as Peanut Linux, is a strange GNU/Linux distribution. It bills itself as a "Professional Linux Operating System" for advanced users, hobbyists, and new Linux users. However, the distribution has a number of problems that make it unsuitable for new users and unpleasant even for experienced users.

Oh well, I liked it.

Samsung Targets Intel

Filed under
Hardware

Samsung Electronics Monday hinted that its next target is Intel Corp., the world’s biggest semiconductor maker headquartered in the United States.

GLA protests against "product placement" for M$ on German TV

Filed under
Linux

The German Linux Association is calling on Germany's ARD, the public Channel One, to remove the Microsoft logo from its reports on the elections. The lobby group stated that it was considering taking legal action.

Novell Exec Says Linux Growing

Filed under
Linux

David Patrick, vice president and general manager of Novell's Linux, open-source platforms and services group, spoke with Computerworld about the company's prospects as it tries to shift its customer base from NetWare to the open-source Linux operating system.

Also: Novell: Vista will drive users to Linux

S.Korean Music Industry Sues 1,985

Filed under
Legal

South Korea's music industry filed a criminal lawsuit Monday against 1,985 Internet file-swapping program users, in a move to stem unauthorized song swapping on the Web.

Strengthening Open Source's Weakest Link

Filed under
OSS

The cornerstone of open source software is the free availability of its source code, which lets developers and users around the world contribute to it and improve it. The power of participation has been confined almost entirely to the development phase of the software life cycle. Testing remains open source's weakest link as it is difficult to reproduce all intended usages.

Your rPath to Conary

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Development Release: rPath Linux 0.51 (Alpha) was announced by DistroWatch yesterday, and I was a bit curious. After my first glance, I was a bit taken aback. rPath doesn't seem to be targetting desktop users. Although it ships with KDE and Gnome, they aren't the most up-to-date versions, nor are they dressed up or enhanced in any manner distinguishable. In my humble opinion, I think rPath is probably a developer's platform, ...a conary developer's platform.

The Linux Show Returns

Filed under
Linux

From high atop the lofty tower of their new (but still secret) location in Chicago, Kevin Hill and Jeff Gerhardt announced today the long awaited return of THE LINUX SHOW.

Linux Kernel Local Vulnerabilities

Filed under
Security

Linux Kernel versions prior to 2.6.13.1 contain two vulnerabilities which could be exploited by local attackers to obtain elevated privileges, cause a denial of service, or disclose sensitive information.

If you build it they will come

Filed under
Linux

A NZ training center hopes to raise $2 million from the Government and private sources to turn a suburb into a hotbed for open-source software development by late next year.

ARP's Linux Noob Guide

Filed under
Linux

There are many reasons why you should learn to use Linux. You might prefer the stability of Linux, and the fact that you don't have to keep rebooting your PC. But Linux, with its mighty command line, can seem pretty daunting to a new user. So, I've come up with a little guide to get you started on Linux!

TV Finds Its Niches on the Internet

Filed under
Web

I was watching the news anchors at WDSU-TV, a station based in New Orleans live, via streaming Internet TV, on a home computer. "It was much more intense, more frightening than watching CNN."

New distro: Ultima 4

Filed under
Reviews

Ultima can be described very simply: it is Slackware pre-configured into a very useable desktop. So, DO expect Slackware's stability, performance and simplicity, as well as low hardware requirements.

Is SUPER Superior?

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

SUPER is a project to optimize SuSE for speed and performance. In looking for an idea for my next article, I thought this project's lastest effort might make an interesting review. It's based on OpenSuSE's latest release, which is 10.0 RC1. Being concerned with speed and performance, this review could not help but compare SUPER's times with that of OpenSuSE's. However, there was another kink in the armor. I'd already compared OpenSuSE with Mandriva. I got to thinking, is SUPER really faster than other two contenders?

Confidence in Open Source

Filed under
OSS

During the introductions my friend mentioned to his client that I was "an expert" in Linux and Open Source. The IT manager made the comment, "We have a few boxes around but we really haven't gotten into Linux yet." I smiled and we continued to talk, but the question remained with me, "Why was it that they have a few Linux servers lying around but hadn't gotten into Linux?"

Linux Advances In Europe's Schools And Governments

Filed under
Linux

Hundreds of schools in Italy switch their Windows XP Computers to Linux. Over 16,000 students have joined the migration, known as the FUSS project. Many computers will be installed with the Gnome desktop environment.

The History Of Linux

Filed under
Linux

It was 1991, and the ruthless agonies of the cold war was gradually coming to an end. There was an air of peace and tranquility that prevailed in the horizon. In the field of computing, a great future seemed to be in the offing, as powerful hardware pushed the limits of the computers beyond what anyone expected. But still, something was missing.

Mozilla offers temporary fix for Firefox flaw

Filed under
Moz/FF

Responding to the disclosure of a serious Web browser flaw, the Mozilla Foundation offered on Friday a temporary fix to protect Firefox and Mozilla users.

Value of open-source software touted

Filed under
OSS

In a report to be presented at the World Bank yesterday, a group that includes senior government officials from 13 countries will urge nations to adopt open-information technology standards as a vital step to accelerate economic growth, efficiency and innovation.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: WebAssembly Interface Type, Bryce and Brady, FPR16

  • WebAssembly Interface Types: Interoperate with All the Things!

    People are excited about running WebAssembly outside the browser. That excitement isn’t just about WebAssembly running in its own standalone runtime. People are also excited about running WebAssembly from languages like Python, Ruby, and Rust.

  • Support.Mozilla.Org: Introducing Bryce and Brady

    I’m thrilled to share this update with you today. Bryce and Brady have joined us last week and will be able to help out on Support for some of the new efforts Mozilla are working on towards creating a connected and integrated Firefox experience. They are going to be involved with new products, but also they won’t forget to put extra effort in providing support on forums and as well as serving as an escalation point for hard to solve issues.

  • FPR16 delays

    FPR16 was supposed to reach you in beta sometime tomorrow but I found a reproducible crash in the optimized build, probably due to one of my vain attempts to fix JavaScript bugs. I'm still investigating exactly which change(s) were responsible. We should still make the deadline (September 3) to be concurrent with the 60.9/68.1 ESRs, but there will not be much of a beta testing period and I don't anticipate it being available until probably at least Friday or Saturday. More later.

Games: Loria, Dota Underlords and Steam in China

  • Classic inspired RTS Loria is now available DRM-free on GOG

    If you're like me and you enjoy a good real-time strategy game, Loria is actually pretty good. It added Linux support on Steam earlier this year and now it's also available on GOG. While it's inspired by titles like Warcraft II, it's not just a retro RTS. There's a few RPG-like elements including hero units, item collection, quests and more.

  • The Underlords are actually coming to Dota Underlords, plus a new Duos mode

    Valve continue to push out changes rapidly to their auto-battler Dota Underlords, with some of their upcoming plans now being detailed in a fresh update. One big new feature planned to be available in a few weeks is a new Duos game mode. Valve say it's a new way to play cooperatively with a friend. You party up and battle against other teams and it will support both Casual and Ranked play. The actual Underlords are going to be making an appearance soon too. This feature Valve said they're "excited" about, as they're a "core part of the game". They haven't said how they will work but they will "add a layer of fun and strategy to every match" so I'm very curious to see what happens.

  • Steam for China Is Called 'Zhengpi Pingtai'

    The digital games service will be run almost entirely independent of Steam and by Valve's Chinese partner company Perfect World.

Samsung Galaxy Note 10 now links up with Windows and Mac PCs via supercharged DeX app

And there’s a big bonus here in the form of being able to drag-and-drop files directly from your phone to your PC, and vice versa. So you could take a photo from your Note 10 and whip it onto the PC to tweak it up in a proper heavyweight image editor, for example. Furthermore, as XDA Developers observes, Linux on DeX is available via the DeX app, allowing you to create a container and run an Ubuntu Linux image, giving you even more flexibility and options here. It’s not clear what Samsung intends to do in terms of giving users with older Galaxy handsets backwards compatibility, but at the moment, this is strictly a Galaxy Note 10-only affair, as mentioned. Finally, it’s worth noting that the app does warn that your phone might get hot running the DeX application, although exactly how hot likely depends on what you’ve got the hardware doing, of course. Read more

Android Leftovers