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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 21 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Story Compilers News: GCC and LLVM Roy Schestowitz 29/10/2018 - 5:50am
Story Lubuntu 18.10 - now with LXQt Roy Schestowitz 29/10/2018 - 4:19am
Story Graphics: Freedreno Gallium3D and AMDGPU Roy Schestowitz 29/10/2018 - 4:08am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 29/10/2018 - 4:06am
Story POWER9 On Linux Will See Faster Context Switching, Other Optimizations Roy Schestowitz 29/10/2018 - 3:58am
Story Linux MD RAID 10 Improvements/Fixes Queued For Linux 4.20~5.0 Roy Schestowitz 28/10/2018 - 1:26am
Story Linus Torvalds Shows His New Polite Side While Pointing Out Bad Kernel Code Roy Schestowitz 1 06/11/2018 - 4:42pm
Story Programming Surveys and Ranks Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2018 - 4:06am
Story Kernel: Linux 4.20 (or 5.0) Changes and Graphics Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2018 - 4:04am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2018 - 3:02am

Rodents May Be Partly to Blame for Outage

Filed under
Sci/Tech

New Zealand's largest telecommunications provider was checking Tuesday whether rats gnawing a cable were partly to blame for an outage that disrupted mobile phone and Internet services and shut down the country's Stock Exchange on Monday.

ABIT Factory Tour

Filed under
Hardware

Join hardwaresecrets.com as they tour the Abit factory in SuZhou, China. From R&D, passed the assembly line, programming, and burn-in to rigorous testing, one can get some wonderful insight to the process of motherboard manufacturing.

Kicking Linux's Tires

Filed under
Linux

Tips for installing and road-testing Linux relevant to those who are still computing Bill Gates-style.

M$ Announces DRM-Oriented Programming Language

Filed under
Humor

No programming language is complete without its own set of paradigm-enriched buzzwords, and that's exactly what Microsoft has promised with its latest gift to the programming world, code-named Freedom Unencumbered (or FU for short).

Chess grandmaster to battle supercomputer

Filed under
Misc

The latest battle between man and machine will kick off at London's Wembley Centre on Tuesday afternoon, when UK's Michael Adams becomes the latest human chess player to take on a supercomputer.

Sun tries sharing Java again; still not open source

Filed under
OSS

Sun Microsystems is trying a new way to share its Java server software, launching a project called GlassFish that lets outsiders tinker with the project's source code but that stops well short of making it actual open-source software.

Japan cardholders 'hit' by theft

Filed under
Security

The hacker who was behind the biggest data theft seen in the US may also have compromised the data of Japanese cardholders, the government has said.

Korea brings open source to 10,000 schools

Filed under
Linux

No offence to Microsoft...

The South Korean government is rolling out a homegrown open source platform to 10,000 schools in the country.

Senator blasts Eidos' 25 to Life

Filed under
Gaming

Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-New York) is embarking on a crusade against Eidos, telling the New York Daily News that the British publisher is readying a game that makes "Grand Theft Auto look like Romper Room."

USPS & eBay team up

Filed under
Misc

The U.S. Postal Service and Internet auction site eBay have teamed up to offer a co-branded Priority Mail shipping service, in special boxes with a flat rate of $7.70.

Security tools face increased attack

Filed under
Security

As the pool of easily exploitable Windows security bugs dries up, hackers are looking for holes in security software to break into PCs, analysts said.

Black Market in Stolen Credit Cards

Filed under
Security
Web

"Want drive fast cars?" asks an advertisement, in broken English, atop the Web site iaaca.com. "Want live in premium hotels? Want own beautiful girls? It's possible with dumps from Zo0mer." A "dump," in the blunt vernacular of a relentlessly flourishing online black market, is a credit card number. And what Zo0mer is peddling is stolen account information - name, billing address, phone - for Gold Visa cards and MasterCards at $100 apiece.

Browser Comparison

Filed under
Software
IE6 verses Netscape 8 verses Opera 8 verses Firefox 1.0.4

While I was upgrading our Statistical hit counter, I was required to download the latest versions of Netscape 8.0.2 and Opera 8.0.1 in order to ensure I could correctly detect their browser strings in the counter. I already have IE6 SP2 and Firefox 1.0.4 installed so this looked like a good time to do a “first impressions” review of the four browsers. I’ll start with the browsers I am most familiar with and work my way down from there.

L4L interviews VP of Appgen Tech

Filed under
Software

Joanie Mann is a no-nonsense, “get it done and I don’t want to hear any excuses” type of executive. She not only believes that Appgen’s product, MyBooks is the best solution for the business world, she is highly capable of convincing you why it is as well. Lobby4Linux is sold. Will you be after reading the interview?

NVIDIA graphics drivers to go multithreaded

Filed under
Software

techreport.com recently spoke with Ben de Waal, NVIDIA's Vice President of GPU software, and he revealed that NVIDIA has plans to produce multithreaded ForceWare graphics drivers for its GeForce graphics products.

Sony spotlights films for Europe PSP launch

Filed under
Gaming

Sony will have 20 video games and 10 films on sale in September for the European launch of the PlayStation Portable, executives said on Monday, with 100,000 pre-recorded movies already sold around the world.

HP Ships More Than 1 Mil Linux Servers

Filed under
Hardware

HP has announced that it has set an industry-first milestone by shipping more than one million Linux servers to customers since 1998, 45% more than any other major hardware vendor.

Does the OS matter anymore?

Filed under
OS

Most of us have been conditioned for so long that the Microsoft "platform" is essential that we scarcely pause to think about alternatives. But as long as we can perform our essential tasks - print that report, send that email - does the operating system really matter?

MTV acquires virtual critter site NeoPets

Filed under
Web

MTV, which also owns runs Nickelodeon and Nick.com, said the addition of NeoPets.com to its portfolio will boost its presence in the online entertainment segment for children and young adults.

Perplexed consumers dial up tech 'geeks'

Filed under
Sci/Tech

"Help! Send a geek!"

That's the growing cry of technology shoppers across the USA as they grapple with increasingly complex computers and other consumer electronics.

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More in Tux Machines

First Release Candidate of Linux 5.3

  • Linux 5.3-rc1
    It's been two weeks, and the merge window is over, and Linux 5.3-rc1
    is tagged and pushed out.
    
    This is a pretty big release, judging by the commit count. Not the
    biggest ever (that honor still goes to 4.9-rc1, which was
    exceptionally big), and we've had a couple of comparable ones (4.12,
    4.15 and 4.19 were also big merge windows), but it's definitely up
    there.
    
    The merge window also started out pretty painfully, with me hitting a
    couple of bugs in the first couple of days. That's never a good sign,
    since I don't tend to do anything particularly odd, and if I hit bugs
    it means code wasn't tested well enough. In one case it was due to me
    using a simplified configuration that hadn't been tested, and caused
    an odd issue to show up - it happens. But in the other case, it really
    was code that was too recent and too rough and hadn't baked enough.
    The first got fixed, the second just got reverted.
    
    Anyway, despite the rocky start, and the big size, things mostly
    smoothed out towards the end of the merge window. And there's a lot to
    like in 5.3. Too much to do the shortlog with individual commits, of
    course, so appended is the usual "mergelog" of people I merged from
    and a one-liner very high-level "what got merged". For more detail,
    you should go check the git tree.
    
    As always: the people credited below are just the people I pull from,
    there's about 1600 individual developers (for 12500+ non-merge
    commits) in this merge window.
    
    Go test,
    
                Linus
    
  • Linux 5.3-rc1 Debuts As "A Pretty Big Release"

    Just as expected, Linus Torvalds this afternoon issued the first release candidate of the forthcoming Linux 5.3 kernel. It's just not us that have been quite eager for Linux 5.3 and its changes. Torvalds acknowledged in the 5.3-rc1 announcement that this kernel is indeed a big one: "This is a pretty big release, judging by the commit count. Not the biggest ever (that honor still goes to 4.9-rc1, which was exceptionally big), and we've had a couple of comparable ones (4.12, 4.15 and 4.19 were also big merge windows), but it's definitely up there."

  • The New Features & Improvements Of The Linux 5.3 Kernel

    The Linux 5.3 kernel merge window is expected to close today so here is our usual recap of all the changes that made it into the mainline tree over the past two weeks. There is a lot of changes to be excited about from Radeon RX 5700 Navi support to various CPU improvements and ongoing performance work to supporting newer Apple MacBook laptops and Intel Speed Select Technology enablement.

today's howtos and programming bits

  • How to fix Ubuntu live USB not booting
  • How to Create a User Account Without useradd Command in Linux?
  • Container use cases explained in depth
  • Containerization and orchestration concepts explained
  • Set_env.py

    A good practice when writing complicated software is to put in lots of debugging code. This might be extra logging, or special modes that tweak the behavior to be more understandable, or switches to turn off some aspect of your test suite so you can focus on the part you care about at the moment. But how do you control that debugging code? Where are the on/off switches? You don’t want to clutter your real UI with controls. A convenient option is environment variables: you can access them simply in the code, your shell has ways to turn them on and off at a variety of scopes, and they are invisible to your users. Though if they are invisible to your users, they are also invisible to you! How do you remember what exotic options you’ve coded into your program, and how do you easily see what is set, and change what is set?

  • RPushbullet 0.3.2

    A new release 0.3.2 of the RPushbullet package is now on CRAN. RPushbullet is interfacing the neat Pushbullet service for inter-device messaging, communication, and more. It lets you easily send alerts like the one to the left to your browser, phone, tablet, … – or all at once. This is the first new release in almost 2 1/2 years, and it once again benefits greatly from contributed pull requests by Colin (twice !) and Chan-Yub – see below for details.

  • A Makefile for your Go project (2019)

    My most loathed feature of Go was the mandatory use of GOPATH: I do not want to put my own code next to its dependencies. I was not alone and people devised tools or crafted their own Makefile to avoid organizing their code around GOPATH.

  • Writing sustainable Python scripts

    Python is a great language to write a standalone script. Getting to the result can be a matter of a dozen to a few hundred lines of code and, moments later, you can forget about it and focus on your next task. Six months later, a co-worker asks you why the script fails and you don’t have a clue: no documentation, hard-coded parameters, nothing logged during the execution and no sensible tests to figure out what may go wrong. Turning a “quick-and-dirty” Python script into a sustainable version, which will be easy to use, understand and support by your co-workers and your future self, only takes some moderate effort. 

  • Notes to self when using genRSS.py

The Status of Fractional Scaling (HiDPI) Between Windows & Linux

There’s a special type of displays commonly called “HiDPI“, which means that the number of pixels in the screen is doubled (vertically and horizontally), making everything drawn on the screen look sharper and better. One of the most common examples of HiDPI are Apple’s Retina displays, which do come with their desktops and laptops. However, one issue with HiDPI is that the default screen resolutions are too small to be displayed on them, so we need what’s called as “scaling”; Which is simply also doubling the drawn pixels from the OS side so that they can match that of the display. Otherwise, displaying a 400×400 program window on a 3840×2160 display will give a very horrible user experience, so the OS will need to scale that window (and everything) by a factor of 2x, to make it 800×800, which would make it better. Fractional scaling is the process of doing the previous work, but by using fractional scaling numbers (E.g 1.25, 1.4, 1.75.. etc), so that they can be customized better according to the user’s setup and needs. Now where’s the issue, you may ask? Windows operating system has been supporting such kind of displays natively for a very long time, but Linux distributions do lack a lot of things in this field. There are many drawbacks, issues and other things to consider. This article will take you in a tour about that. Read more Also: Vulkan 1.1.116 Published With Subgroup Size Control Extension

Android Leftovers