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About Tux Machines

Friday, 18 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The True Measure of a Successful Open Source Project Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2014 - 4:04pm
Story Google reveals the first ultra-cheap Android One smartphones Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2014 - 11:41am
Story Acquia to deliver government's cloud-hosted, open source CMS Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2014 - 11:00am
Story Speed or torque? Linux desktop vs. server distros Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2014 - 10:56am
Story How to lobby for open source and Linux in schools Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2014 - 10:54am
Story FreeBSD 10.1-BETA1 Now Available Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2014 - 7:17am
Story Samsung to host first open-source conference Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2014 - 7:10am
Story Linux 3.17-rc5 Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2014 - 7:06am
Story Torvalds says he has no strong opinions on systemd Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2014 - 7:04am
Story Hello World: Videos That Teach Linux To Kids Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2014 - 7:01am

Taking On the Database Giants

Filed under
OSS

Can open-source upstarts compete with Oracle, IBM, and Microsoft? It's an uphill battle, but customers are starting to look at the alternatives

First Look: BackTrack 3.0

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Among the distributions specialising in security and penetration testing, the SLAX-based WHAX (previously Whoppix) has always been one of the most in-demand live CDs. In recent months, however, its developers combined their knowledge and resources with those of Auditor Security Linux to produce a new live CD, called BackTrack. After a brief period of testing, the first beta of the new distribution was released last week. So what is BackTrack like?

Which tech trends will merit attention in 2006?

Filed under
Sci/Tech

What's ahead for tech this year? Connect offers this forecast from tech reporters who live and work in the heart of Silicon Valley.

Is Linux Next?

Filed under
Security

A report warns of security vulnerabilities, raising the question of whether the open-source model can provide bulletproof software.

Also: Linux Vulnerabilities Spur Enterprise Warning

Virtualization companies vie for advantage

Filed under
Software

Three companies selling software to let servers run software more efficiently will try to advance their respective fortunes Monday with new software, a new partnership and a new promotion.

An Introduction to Video Surveillance with 'Motion'

Filed under
HowTos

Videochatting and amateur pornography are all well and good, but have you ever wondered what else you can do with that webcam?

Well, thanks to the efforts of many dedicated open-source coders, any half-decent PC can be turned into a motion-detecting, snapshot-making, video-recording D.I.Y. security solution.

Making a Genius Scanner Work With SuSE

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

My Genius ColorPage Vivid4 USB scanner worked acceptably under Windows, so it was the time to get it working with SANE.

OOo Off the Wall: The Elephant in the Living Room -- OOo and MS Office

Filed under
OOo

For OpenOffice.org (OOo), MS Office (MSO) is the elephant in the living room. As much as the project might want to ignore MSO, it cannot. Many potential users never have used anything except MSO, and most have to share files with MSO users at some point.

First Look: Free SeaMonkey Internet Tool Suite Is Solid

Filed under
Moz/FF

Volunteers update the former Mozilla Application Suite to combine a browser with e-mail, chat, and Web design tools, just like old times.

Fixing Patents, Open-Source Style

Filed under
OSS

The U.S. Patent Office has a big problem with how it grants software patents. And open-source developers are ready to help it out.

Also: Patent Office takes second look at JPEG

Book Review: Linux Patch management - Keeping Linux systems up to date

Filed under
Linux

It is a waste of time and bandwidth to individually download all the patches and security fixes for each machine. This is where this book named "Linux Patch Management - Keeping Linux systems up to date" authored by Michael Jang gains significance.

Google, Skype in Startup to Link Hotspots

Filed under
Google

Google Inc. and eBay Inc.'s Skype are investing in a startup that plans to help hotspot owners charge for Wi-Fi access, a plan that could face significant opposition from Internet service providers.

Linux Australia addresses burnout syndrome

Filed under
Linux

The nation's peak Linux body will informally separate some of its governance and executive functions in a move to relieve some of the pressure on its voluntary leadership.

The Rise of Real-time Linux

Filed under
Linux

New real-time Linux enhancements open a whole new world of possibilities for Linux, ranging across the latest 3G technologies and as near as the mobile handset in your pocket. The purpose of modifying the Linux kernel with real-time functionality: to dramatically reduce interrupt and task preemption latency, thus enabling the 2.6 kernel for use in high-performance multimedia applications and those requiring extremely fast, task level reliable control functions. Real-time Linux has come a long way - where is it now and where is it heading?

Tuxmachines: 4th quarter Report

Filed under
Site News

February 4th was Tuxmachines official one year anniversary. Although I put a site up and added content 6 months prior, it was static and unknown. A year ago I began putting a little content in this little cms called Drupal and we've been growing every since. Tuxmachines continued to showed some growth early part of the quarter, but perhaps has now leveled off some.

Claudio Matsuoka: Frankensystem

Filed under
OS

Another post about the Lone Gunmen. Watching carefully the computer screen depicted in the last episode, it seemed to be a bit more ellaborated than your average HollywoodOS (which usually has a green 1200/75 terminal that beeps at each received character along with a spinning wireframe 3D model and a progress bar). The Gunmen OS (which I suspect is in fact MacOS 9 with Kaleidoscope) is a bit different:

Mini Review: Opera 8.5

Filed under
Software

I'm a two browser man. Or rather: I used to be. For a long time I have been using Konqueror and Opera 7 more or less concurrently, depending on the task at hand. I've always liked Opera for its polished, intuitive GUI, and the good rendering engine. However, something always made me go back to Konq, it just felt better for some tasks.

Pentoo Mini LiveCD v2006.0

Filed under
Linux

Pentoo, a Network Security Consortium distribution based off of Gentoo, has released their Mini-Pentoo v2006.0 build. Not only is this a great LiveCD security distribution, but it comes without many of the hassles beginning Linux users have faced when attempting to run Gentoo, and of course Emerge is included. We have the Screenshots!

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More in Tux Machines

Security: WireGuard, Birds and Updates

  • WireGuard Restored In Android's Google Play Store After Brief But Controversial Removal

    After Google dropped the open-source WireGuard app from their Play Store since it contained a donation link, the app has now been restored within Google's software store for Android users but without the donation option. The WireGuard app for Android makes it easy to setup the secure VPN tunnel software on mobile devices, similar to its port to iOS and other platforms. The WireGuard apps are free but have included a donation link to the WireGuard website should anyone wish to optionally make a donation to support the development of this very promising network tech.

  • Letting Birds scooters fly free

    At that point I had everything I need to write a simple app to unlock the scooters, and it worked! For about 2 minutes, at which point the network would notice that the scooter was unlocked when it should be locked and sent a lock command to force disable the scooter again. Ah well. So, what else could I do? The next thing I tried was just modifying some STM firmware and flashing it onto a board. It still booted, indicating that there was no sort of verified boot process. Remember what I mentioned about the throttle being hooked through the STM32's analogue to digital converters[3]? A bit of hacking later and I had a board that would appear to work normally, but about a minute after starting the ride would cut the throttle. Alternative options are left as an exercise for the reader. Finally, there was the component I hadn't really looked at yet. The Quectel modem actually contains its own application processor that runs Linux, making it significantly more powerful than any of the chips actually running the scooter application[4]. The STM communicates with the modem over serial, sending it an AT command asking it to make an SSL connection to a remote endpoint. It then uses further AT commands to send data over this SSL connection, allowing it to talk to the internet without having any sort of IP stack. Figuring out just what was going over this connection was made slightly difficult by virtue of all the debug functionality having been ripped out of the STM's firmware, so in the end I took a more brute force approach - I identified the address of the function that sends data to the modem, hooked up OpenOCD to the SWD pins on the STM, ran OpenOCD's gdb stub, attached gdb, set a breakpoint for that function and then dumped the arguments being passed to that function. A couple of minutes later and I had a full transaction between the scooter and the remote. The scooter authenticates against the remote endpoint by sending its serial number and IMEI. You need to send both, but the IMEI didn't seem to need to be associated with the serial number at all. New connections seemed to take precedence over existing connections, so it would be simple to just pretend to be every scooter and hijack all the connections, resulting in scooter unlock commands being sent to you rather than to the scooter or allowing someone to send fake GPS data and make it impossible for users to find scooters.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (poppler, sudo, and wordpress), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, and kernel), and SUSE (kernel and postgresql10).

Android Leftovers

Xfce4-Panel Adds Dark Mode Preference

Landing this week in xfce4-panel was this commit providing a dark mode preference for Xfce4, similar to the growing trend with other desktops/UIs for those wanting a "dark mode" interface. Enabling this option will request the GTK dark theme variant of capable themes. For a long time now GTK has exposed a property (gtk-application-prefer-dark-theme) for preferring dark themes while now is being tapped by xfce4-panel. Read more

Cascade Lake vs. Rome With MrBayes, dav1d 0.5, OSPray, SVT-VP9, OIDn + Other Benchmarks

While swapping around CPUs for the AMD EPYC vs. Intel Xeon Cascade Lake testing of Facebook's RocksDB enterprise workload testing, I also took the opportunity for running some other recently updated test profiles on these EPYC/Xeon parts under test. These newest results shouldn't be particularly surprising but are primarily just benchmark results for some updated versions of existing tests. With recently a number of updated test profiles on OpenBenchmarking.org against the upstream programs under test, here are simply those latest performance numbers when running on the dual Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 and the AMD EPYC 7601 Naples and EPYC 7502 / 7642 / 7742 Rome processors all in 2P configurations. The setups were the same as from the RocksDB testing with running the newly-minted Ubuntu 19.10. Read more