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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 21 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Hands-on with PCLinuxOS 2014.05 KDE and LXDE: The Linux with something for everyone Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 11:50am
Story App.net's open source failure Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 11:43am
Story PyPy 2.3 - Terrestrial Arthropod Trap Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 11:40am
Story Kim Komando: Buy a computer for less than $100 Roy Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 7:33am
Story Linux Community Dev Ports Unreal Editor Before Epic Games Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 7:21am
Story Open source everywhere at Plovdiv military prosecution Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 7:18am
Story OpenVPN Import Broken in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 6:27am
Story Oracle continue to circumvent EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL() Roy Schestowitz 11/05/2014 - 8:51pm
Story Interview with Ciaran Gultnieks of F-Droid Roy Schestowitz 11/05/2014 - 8:39pm
Story Siduction Is the First OS to Adopt the New LXQt Desktop Environement Rianne Schestowitz 11/05/2014 - 8:37pm

Judge dismisses most of Novell's lawsuit against M$

Filed under
Microsoft

A U.S. district court judge has thrown out four counts in Novell's antitrust lawsuit against Microsoft, but let stand two other counts accusing the software giant of damaging Novell's business through monopolistic behavior.

Electronic Arts up on merger rumor

Filed under
Gaming

Shares of Electronic Arts Inc. rose 8.4 percent in heavy trading Monday as the stock caught up to the gains of other video-game makers, and rumors spread that it might be close to acquiring Ubisoft Entertainment SA of France.

Two more Resident Evil movies planned

Filed under
Movies
Gaming

German production company planning fourth film before third even begins production; Milla Jovovich to reprise role.

Red Hat Releases Fedora Core 4

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat has just announced the new version of Fedora Core, a week after the company said it was creating the Fedora Foundation to run the project. Fedora Core 4 (FC4) promises the latest and greatest of the free and open source world, including GNOME 2.10 and KDE 3.4.

You Want A WAR? I'll Give You A War!

Filed under
Linux

You need to look to Europe where the bloodiest battle of the war is currently being fought. Linux and Open Source have engaged the enemy there on the battlefield of patents and monopolies.

n/a

'Smart' graphics framework for KDE nears release

Filed under
KDE

Norwegian software company Trolltech has unveiled a release candidate of Qt 4, the graphical framework on which the next major version of Linux desktop KDE will be based. The final version of Qt 4 will be released later this month.

M$ joins Y!, gg in censoring China's web

Filed under
Microsoft

Users of Microsoft's new China-based Internet portal were blocked from using the words "democracy", "freedom" and "human rights" in an apparent move by the US software giant to appease Beijing.

Man Charged for Trying to Steal User Data

Filed under
Security

A man was arrested Monday for allegedly setting up a phony Internet portal site to lure victims into giving personal data, an official said. Police said it was Japan's first arrest linked to a form of identity theft called phishing.

War of the Worlds premiere in Tokyo

Filed under
Movies

The cast and director were on hand for the premiere of War Of The Worlds in Tokyo, Japan June 13, 2005. A new film version of HG Wells classic 1898 novel directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Cruise and Dakota Fanning. Pix available.

Nokia develops new browser using oss

Filed under
KDE
OSS

Nokia announced today that it is using best-of-breed open source software as the basis of a new mobile browser for its world leading smartphone software, the Series 60 Platform.

Second Blue Gene system rises up the ranks

Filed under
Hardware

A second Blue Gene/L supercomputer has posted speed results that lift it to the high ranks of supercomputing, second only to IBM's original Blue Gene/L system.

An Interview with Icculus

Filed under
Gaming

Ryan C. Gordon, also known as Icculus, is the one responsible for creating native Linux and Macintosh ports for a number of different popular games on the market, such as the Unreal 200X series. Ryan is also the system administrator for over 100 open source developers that work on a countless number of open source projects. Icculus also maintains icculus.org, which is the home to a number of open source projects. Read on as we speak with this very intriguing Linux developer.

Intel Chip Prices Remain the Same

Filed under
Hardware

Intel published its latest chip price list on Sunday, without lowering the cost of a single chip, indicating the personal computer industry is humming along this year.

Firefox Still Chipping Away at IE

Filed under
Moz/FF

The Mozilla Foundation's Firefox managed to slightly increase its usage share in the Web browser market in May, as it continues to compete against the market's Goliath: Microsoft's Internet Explorer. More mainstream users are discovering the alternative browser.

Xbox cable danger resurfaces

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft must be kicking themselves or those manufacturing their Xbox console this morning, after it was discovered the cable issue from earlier this year has resurfaced.

Security chip to limit OS X to Macs

Filed under
Mac

Apple could use the Trusted Platform Module chip to ensure that only Mac computers can run its OS X operating system.

Linux Lure

Filed under
Linux

It was nearly a disaster when Cedar Chang installed a Linux operating system in his notebook two years ago, eventually reinstalling the Windows XP bundled with his IBM notebook. But when the 27-year-old technology buff downloaded Linux-based Firefox, the experience was considerably different. So Chang rethought his decision to switch back to Windows XP.

Forbidden fruit

Filed under
Mac

Apple seeks more federal business, but along with Bigfoot and the Bermuda Triangle, its strategy remains a mystery.

Gamers turn cities into a battleground

Filed under
Gaming

Matt has been abandoned on Tower Bridge, London, with nothing except his clothes and a mobile phone. A woman dressed in black walks past, and Matt receives a text message to follow her. He doesn't know who she is, or where she is going. All he knows is that he must follow her if he is to find Uncle Roy.

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More in Tux Machines

First Release Candidate of Linux 5.3

  • Linux 5.3-rc1
    It's been two weeks, and the merge window is over, and Linux 5.3-rc1
    is tagged and pushed out.
    
    This is a pretty big release, judging by the commit count. Not the
    biggest ever (that honor still goes to 4.9-rc1, which was
    exceptionally big), and we've had a couple of comparable ones (4.12,
    4.15 and 4.19 were also big merge windows), but it's definitely up
    there.
    
    The merge window also started out pretty painfully, with me hitting a
    couple of bugs in the first couple of days. That's never a good sign,
    since I don't tend to do anything particularly odd, and if I hit bugs
    it means code wasn't tested well enough. In one case it was due to me
    using a simplified configuration that hadn't been tested, and caused
    an odd issue to show up - it happens. But in the other case, it really
    was code that was too recent and too rough and hadn't baked enough.
    The first got fixed, the second just got reverted.
    
    Anyway, despite the rocky start, and the big size, things mostly
    smoothed out towards the end of the merge window. And there's a lot to
    like in 5.3. Too much to do the shortlog with individual commits, of
    course, so appended is the usual "mergelog" of people I merged from
    and a one-liner very high-level "what got merged". For more detail,
    you should go check the git tree.
    
    As always: the people credited below are just the people I pull from,
    there's about 1600 individual developers (for 12500+ non-merge
    commits) in this merge window.
    
    Go test,
    
                Linus
    
  • Linux 5.3-rc1 Debuts As "A Pretty Big Release"

    Just as expected, Linus Torvalds this afternoon issued the first release candidate of the forthcoming Linux 5.3 kernel. It's just not us that have been quite eager for Linux 5.3 and its changes. Torvalds acknowledged in the 5.3-rc1 announcement that this kernel is indeed a big one: "This is a pretty big release, judging by the commit count. Not the biggest ever (that honor still goes to 4.9-rc1, which was exceptionally big), and we've had a couple of comparable ones (4.12, 4.15 and 4.19 were also big merge windows), but it's definitely up there."

  • The New Features & Improvements Of The Linux 5.3 Kernel

    The Linux 5.3 kernel merge window is expected to close today so here is our usual recap of all the changes that made it into the mainline tree over the past two weeks. There is a lot of changes to be excited about from Radeon RX 5700 Navi support to various CPU improvements and ongoing performance work to supporting newer Apple MacBook laptops and Intel Speed Select Technology enablement.

today's howtos and programming bits

  • How to fix Ubuntu live USB not booting
  • How to Create a User Account Without useradd Command in Linux?
  • Container use cases explained in depth
  • Containerization and orchestration concepts explained
  • Set_env.py

    A good practice when writing complicated software is to put in lots of debugging code. This might be extra logging, or special modes that tweak the behavior to be more understandable, or switches to turn off some aspect of your test suite so you can focus on the part you care about at the moment. But how do you control that debugging code? Where are the on/off switches? You don’t want to clutter your real UI with controls. A convenient option is environment variables: you can access them simply in the code, your shell has ways to turn them on and off at a variety of scopes, and they are invisible to your users. Though if they are invisible to your users, they are also invisible to you! How do you remember what exotic options you’ve coded into your program, and how do you easily see what is set, and change what is set?

  • RPushbullet 0.3.2

    A new release 0.3.2 of the RPushbullet package is now on CRAN. RPushbullet is interfacing the neat Pushbullet service for inter-device messaging, communication, and more. It lets you easily send alerts like the one to the left to your browser, phone, tablet, … – or all at once. This is the first new release in almost 2 1/2 years, and it once again benefits greatly from contributed pull requests by Colin (twice !) and Chan-Yub – see below for details.

  • A Makefile for your Go project (2019)

    My most loathed feature of Go was the mandatory use of GOPATH: I do not want to put my own code next to its dependencies. I was not alone and people devised tools or crafted their own Makefile to avoid organizing their code around GOPATH.

  • Writing sustainable Python scripts

    Python is a great language to write a standalone script. Getting to the result can be a matter of a dozen to a few hundred lines of code and, moments later, you can forget about it and focus on your next task. Six months later, a co-worker asks you why the script fails and you don’t have a clue: no documentation, hard-coded parameters, nothing logged during the execution and no sensible tests to figure out what may go wrong. Turning a “quick-and-dirty” Python script into a sustainable version, which will be easy to use, understand and support by your co-workers and your future self, only takes some moderate effort. 

  • Notes to self when using genRSS.py

The Status of Fractional Scaling (HiDPI) Between Windows & Linux

There’s a special type of displays commonly called “HiDPI“, which means that the number of pixels in the screen is doubled (vertically and horizontally), making everything drawn on the screen look sharper and better. One of the most common examples of HiDPI are Apple’s Retina displays, which do come with their desktops and laptops. However, one issue with HiDPI is that the default screen resolutions are too small to be displayed on them, so we need what’s called as “scaling”; Which is simply also doubling the drawn pixels from the OS side so that they can match that of the display. Otherwise, displaying a 400×400 program window on a 3840×2160 display will give a very horrible user experience, so the OS will need to scale that window (and everything) by a factor of 2x, to make it 800×800, which would make it better. Fractional scaling is the process of doing the previous work, but by using fractional scaling numbers (E.g 1.25, 1.4, 1.75.. etc), so that they can be customized better according to the user’s setup and needs. Now where’s the issue, you may ask? Windows operating system has been supporting such kind of displays natively for a very long time, but Linux distributions do lack a lot of things in this field. There are many drawbacks, issues and other things to consider. This article will take you in a tour about that. Read more Also: Vulkan 1.1.116 Published With Subgroup Size Control Extension

Android Leftovers