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Sunday, 18 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Linux: Ready, willing and able srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Story Microsoft's IT security plans spark controversy srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Story Paris Hilton's sidekick hacked srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Blog entry Weird *ss Weather srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Greetings From the Most Connected Place on Earth srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Get Into the Flame War ...please! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Linux kernel to include IPv6 firewall srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:25am
Story Linux For The Future srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:25am
Story M$ Not Ready to Settle Yet srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:24am
Story security breach affects every state srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:24am

Linux Foundation: Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe and Cloud Native Computing Foundation Milestone

Filed under
OSS
  • Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe 2019 Schedule – October 28-30

    I may have just written about Linaro Connect San Diego 2019 schedule, but there's another interesting event that will also take place this fall...

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Reaches 100 End User Community Members

    "The End User Community is a crucial pillar of CNCF, providing feedback on projects, suggesting new projects, and ensuring the community remains vendor neutral," said Cheryl Hung, Director of Ecosystem at Cloud Native Computing Foundation. "We are hugely grateful for these member organizations and their commitment to the cloud native community, and look forward to continued growth in both the development and use of cloud native technologies."

Devices: Commell SBC, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Teensy and Linaro

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Report From LibreOffice Asia Conference and More Reasons to Move to LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO
Microsoft
OSS
  • LibreOffice Asia Conference Report: Part 2

    Foreword: the LibreOffice Asia Conference was successfully held in May 2019 in Tokyo. Kuan-Ting Lin, a university student and civic tech reporter also attended this conference and gives his observations here. In Part II, Kuan-Ting starts with the Open Document Format, and expounds on how to form an open government and better autonomy of Taiwan.

    The “Taiwanese Language channel” (tâi-gí-tâi) of the Public Television Service (PTS) in Taiwan started its broadcasting service in July 2019. This channel became possible only because the National Languages Act was approved in parliament. This policy was rooted by many in the decision to improve expression, alleviation of limits on speeches, and the consolidation of autonomy following the new law.

    After a long-time struggle, the state also sees a silver lining regarding another autonomy issue: document liberation.

  • Let's see what the sweet, kind, new Microsoft that everyone loves is up to. Ah yes, forcing more Office home users into annual subscriptions

    Microsoft is continuing its campaign to drive Office users onto a subscription plan by killing off its discounted Home Use program.

    The program covers individuals whose employer already has an Office subscription and allowed them to download standalone software on a separate home machine for a greatly reduced price of just $15. But no more.

    Eligible users will still get a discount – but only on an Office subscription package. No more standalone software. Microsoft is keen that everyone recognizes this change for the wonderful opportunity it is.

    "Microsoft is updating the Home Use Program to offer discounts on the latest and most up to date products such as Office 365, which is always up to date with premium versions of Office apps across all your devices," it chirpily announced in a new FAQ question this week, before noting that "Office Professional Plus 2019 and Office Home and Business 2019 are no longer available as Home Use Program offers."

    Why the change? You won't believe this but it seems money is at the root of it. Rather than pay $15 for a piece of software that you can then use for years, Microsoft's "update" will require home users (whose employers already have a subscription with Microsoft) to pay either $49 or $70 for the Personal and Home Office 365 services respectively. Every year.

AMD and Intel: RdRand and Clear Linux Documentation

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • AMD Bulldozer/Jaguar CPUs Will No Longer Advertise RdRand Support Under Linux

    Not directly related to the recent AMD Zen 2 BIOS update needed to fix an RdRand problem (though somewhat related in that the original systemd bug report for faulty AMD RdRand stems from these earlier CPUs), but AMD has now decided to no longer advertise RdRand support for Family 15h (Bulldozer) and Family 16h (Jaguar) processors under Linux.

    The RdRand instruction will still work on capable CPUs, but the CPU ID bit is being cleared so that it won't be advertised for software explicitly checking for the support. Tom Lendacky of AMD reesorted to clearing the RDRAND CPU ID bit for 15h/16h processors (no impact for Zen, etc) due to RdRand issues cropping up after suspend/resume. Those issues have affected some users for a while and originate with the original AMD RdRand systemd bug report over problems following that cycle.

  • Clear Linux Project has a new documentation site

    The Clear Linux OS Docs team is happy to announce that our documentation site for the Clear Linux Project has moved to a Sphinx/reST site with the ubiquitous Read-The-Docs theme, consistent with many open source documentation projects.

  • Clear Linux Rolls Out Revamped Documentation

    While Arch Linux remains the gold standard for quality Linux documentation, Intel's Clear Linux has rolled out a new documentation web-site to assist new/existing users in making use of this performance-optimized and security-oriented Linux operating system.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

12 extensions for your GNOME desktop

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME desktop is the default graphical user interface for most of the popular Linux distributions and some of the BSD and Solaris operating systems. Currently at version 3, GNOME provides a sleek user experience, and extensions are available for additional functionality.

We've covered GNOME extensions at Opensource.com before, but to celebrate GNOME's 22nd anniversary, I decided to revisit the topic. Some of these extensions may already be installed, depending on your Linux distribution; if not, check your package manager.

Read more

Also: Happy anniversary GNOME: What's your favorite version?

How to record screencasts in GNOME 3

Oracle Is Working To Upstream More Of DTrace To The Linux Kernel & eBPF Implementation

Filed under
Linux

While DTrace prospects for the Linux kernel are no longer viewed as magical or groundbreaking as they once were more than a decade ago, Oracle continues to work on its DTrace port to Linux and extending its reach beyond just their "Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel" for their RHEL-cloned Oracle Linux. Oracle now says they are working towards upstreaming more work as well as getting an eBPF-based implementation for the kernel.

On Wednesday, Oracle published a blog post outlining DTrace on Fedora. Getting DTrace working on Fedora isn't trivial: currently it requires building a patched version of the Linux kernel and also building the DTrace user-space utilities. That's how it currently is for most or all Linux distributions besides Oracle Linux with UEK.

Read more

OpenBSD and FreeBSD Updates

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD -stable binary packages

    The OpenBSD base system has received binary updates for security and some other important problems in the base OS through syspatch(8) for the last few releases.

    We are pleased to announce that we now also provide selected binary packages for the most recent release. These are built from the -stable ports tree which receives security and a few other important fixes: [...]

  • FreeBSD Around the World

    One of our major goals this year is to increase FreeBSD awareness around the world. I’m excited about upcoming events, like the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit, where we are giving a talk on FreeBSD. But first, I wanted to highlight some of the events we’ve attended over the past few months. I have been pretty bad about writing event reports, so I’m summarizing some of them here. It’s a good thing our Marketing Director isn’t local, otherwise she would be camping in our office forcing me to write the reports.

New Finnish government to promote open source

Filed under
OSS

The new government of Finland, formally appointed on 6 June, will promote the use of open source software for public services’ IT systems. The preference for open source, open (programming) interfaces and open data is part of the Government Programme that was published on 3 June. A machine translation from the Government Programme entitled: “A participatory and knowledgeable Finland - a socially, economically and ecologically sustainable society”: [...]

Read more

Also: >Why Los Angeles decided to open source its future

Programming: LWN on Python, LLVM 9.0 RC2

Filed under
Development
  • Escape sequences in Python strings

    The three-quote version allows for simpler multi-line strings and can use three double quotes instead if the programmer wants. But strings can also contain escape sequences, such as '\n' for newlines, '\t' for tabs, and so on. That means the backslash has a special meaning, so it needs to be escaped (i.e. '\\') if it is to be used literally, as well. A few other characters, notably a real newline or an embedded quote of the type used to delimit the string, also need to be backslash escaped.
    But what to do about string literals with invalid escape sequences in them? A programmer who has put '\latex' as part of a string literal (to pick a not entirely random example) presumably actually wants '\\latex', which is what Python currently translates it to. Python does emit a DeprecationWarning in that case, but the warning was invisible by default until Python 3.7. However, that same programmer probably does not want '\tan(x)' to turn into a tab plus 'an(x)', but that is exactly what happens.

    The change for Python 3.8 is to further elevate the warning to a SyntaxWarning, with plans to turn that into a SyntaxError in Python 3.9. A bug report filed in February 2018 shows the path of the change. But shortly after the Python 3.8 beta releases were made, Raymond Hettinger reported that he was seeing the warnings "pop up from time to time" from various third-party packages. Aaron Meurer concurred with Hettinger and pointed out a number of other problems he had encountered.

  • LLVM 9.0-RC2 Released While LLVM 10 Switches To C++14

    LLVM 9.0 Release Candidate 2 is now available for testing while LLVM 10.0 has switched its code-base over to supporting C++14.

    Hans Wennborg announced the second and expected final release candidate for the LLVM 9.0 release and associated sub-projects like Clang 9.0. LLVM 9.0 is running about one week behind schedule at this point but there's still time to get it to ship on-time in two weeks, otherwise it's looking like it should land just slightly belated in early September.

  • [llvm-dev] [9.0.0 Release] Release Candidate 2 is here
    Hello everyone,
    
    9.0.0-rc2 was tagged yesterday from the release_90 branch at r368683.
    In the Git monorepo it's available as the llvmorg-9.0.0-rc2 tag.
    
    Source code and docs are available at https://prereleases.llvm.org/9.0.0/#rc2
    
    Binaries will be added as they become available.
    
    The tag went in roughly one week behind schedule (see "Upcoming
    Releases" at https://llvm.org), but there are still two weeks left to
    the planned release date.
    
    Please file bug reports for any issues you find and mark them blocking
    https://llvm.org/PR42474 Please also look at the blockers and see if
    there's anything you can help with -- there are several bugs which
    lack traction at the moment.
    
    Release testers: please start your engines, run the script, share your
    results, and upload binaries.
    
    Many thanks,
    Hans
    

Kernel: AMD Graphics and LWN Articles Outside Paywall

Filed under
Linux
  • AMD Renoir Lands In Mesa's RadeonSI - Further Pointing To Vega, Not Navi

    Last week AMD sent out their initial Linux graphics driver support for next-gen Renoir APUs. Those Linux kernel bits will land with AMDGPU in the upcoming Linux 5.4 cycle while the RadeonSI changes were merged today marking that OpenGL support as a new feature for the upcoming Mesa 19.2.

    Renoir leaks up to this point indicated it would be a 7nm APU based on Zen 2 with Navi graphics. The Zen 2 cores still could be accurate, but the graphics driver patches from last week and the RadeonSI OpenGL driver support today all point to it being Vega.

  • An end to implicit fall-throughs in the kernel

    The C switch statement has, since the beginning of the language, required the use of explicit break statements to prevent execution from falling through from one case to the next. This behavior can be a useful feature, allowing for more compact code, but it can also lead to bugs. The effort to rid the kernel of implicit fall-through coding patterns came to a conclusion with the 5.3-rc2 release, where the last cases were fixed. There is a good chance that these fixes will have to be redone in the future, though.

    The problem with C's fall-through behavior is that it is implicit, with no indication of whether the behavior is intended or not. Developers learn (the hard way, sometimes) to end each case with a break statement as a matter of habit, but it's still an easy thing to forget, and the resulting code is seen by the compiler as being entirely valid. A forgotten break almost certainly introduces a bug, even if it might not manifest itself for years. Many developers have had reason to wish that the C language required an explicit indication by the programmer that fall-through behavior is desired.

  • vDSO, 32-bit time, and seccomp

    The seccomp() mechanism is notoriously difficult to use. It also turns out to be easy to break unintentionally, as the development community discovered when a timekeeping change meant to address the year-2038 problem created a regression for seccomp() users in the 5.3 kernel. Work is underway to mitigate the problem for now, but seccomp() users on 32-bit systems are likely to have to change their configurations at some point.

    The virtual dynamic shared object (vDSO) mechanism is an optimization provided by the kernel to reduce the cost of certain frequently used system calls. The vDSO is a small region of kernel-provided memory that is normally mapped into the address space of every user-space process; it contains implementations of system calls that can, in some circumstances at least, do their work in a user-space context. That allows the caller to avoid making a real system call and, thus, to avoid the cost of a context switch into kernel mode. System calls related to timekeeping, such as gettimeofday() are implemented in the vDSO, since they can often run quickly in user space and they tend to be called frequently.

    The vDSO has generally been implemented in an architecture-specific way, even though the functions it performs are mostly the same across architectures. In the 5.2 development cycle, Vincenzo Frascino added a generic vDSO implementation that factored out much of the architecture-specific code into a single implementation that could be used on all architectures. During the 5.3 merge window, the x86 architecture switched over to the generic version, and all was well — or so it seemed.

Programming: Lisp, CTF, and Python

Filed under
Development
  • Racket: Lisp for learning

    Lisp is one of the oldest programming languages still in use today—Fortran is older by a year, but the Lisp community (or communities) seems to be the more dynamic of the two. In any case, the Lisp landscape has a lot of nooks and crannies to explore; I recently ran into a dialect that I had not encountered before: Racket. That may simply reflect ignorance on my part, but, while I was introduced to Lisp (too) many moons ago, I had not really paid it much mind until I sat in on a talk about Lisp at linux.conf.au earlier this year. Something about Racket caught my eye, so I did some poking around to see what it is all about.

    The dynamism in the Lisp world also means that there are lots of projects, subprojects, dialects, descendants, and so on to keep straight. Lisp itself has split into three main dialects: Common Lisp, Scheme, and Clojure. Common Lisp and Scheme each have multiple implementations. Racket is based on Scheme; it was known as "PLT Scheme" (after the PLT organization behind the language) until version 5.0 was released in 2010.

  • The Compact C Type Format in the GNU toolchain

    The Compact C Type Format (CTF) is a way of representing information about a binary program; it can be seen as a simpler alternative to the widely used DWARF format. While CTF has been around for some years, it has not seen much use in the Linux world. According to Elena Zannoni, who talked about CTF at the 2019 Open Source Summit Japan, that situation may be about to change; work is underway to bring CTF support to the GNU tools shipped universally with Linux systems.
    Compiling a program into its binary form discards a lot of information found in the source code; that information can be needed when the time comes to track down a bug in the compiled program. To facilitate this work, compilers create debugging information that records the names and types of the variables used by a program, along with function names, the line numbers in the source program, and more; this information is then stored in one of many formats. DWARF is by far the most commonly used format on Unix-like systems, but it is not the only one.

  • Append Vs. Extend in Python List

    In this tutorial, you’ll explore the difference between append and extend methods of Python List. Both these methods are used to manipulate the lists in their specific way.

    The append method adds a single or a group of items (sequence) as one element at the tail of a list. On the other hand, the extend method appends the input elements to the end as part of the original list.

    After reading the above description about append() and extend(), it may seem a bit confusing to you. So, we’ll explain each of these methods with examples and show the difference between them.

  • Accessing Remote Data with a Generalized File System

    For context, we are talking about the low-level business of getting raw bytes from some location. We are used to doing that on a local disk, but communicating with other storage mechanisms can be tricky, and certainly different in every case. For example, consider the different ways you would go about reading files from Hadoop, a server for which you have SSH credentials, or for a cloud storage service like Amazon S3. Since these are important to answer when dealing with big data, we developed code to complement Dask just for the job, and released packages like s3fs and gcsfs.

    We found that those packages, which were built and released standalone, were popular even without Dask, partly because they were being used by other PyData libraries such as pandas and xarray. So we realised that the general idea of dealing with arbitrary file systems, as well as helpful code to map URLs to bytes, should not be buried in Dask, but should be made open and available to everyone, even if they are not interested in parallel/out-of-core computing.

Mozilla's WebThings Gateway now available for Turris Omnia router

Filed under
Moz/FF

The first step for adding devices is to put them in a mode that is receptive to a new pairing, one at a time, then to tell the Gateway web application to scan for them. Once they are recognized (and renamed to something that makes more sense to the user), there are a number of different options. The device state can be queried (e.g. is a door open or a light on) or changed, for example; some devices may require an add-on in order to access them. Users can also create a floor plan of their house to place icons of the devices in the right locations.

Beyond that, there is a rules engine where automated changes can be programmed. So if the user wants a certain light to go on or off at a specific time, for example, that can be done. The interface is icon oriented, which should make it easier for less technical users. There is also an experimental Smart Assistant feature that allows voice or typed commands like "turn on the kitchen light" to be handled. The voice data is sent to Google's voice assistant API; the text commands are handled locally on the Gateway device. It is not clear why the assistant is not using Mozilla's speech-processing engine.

New for version 0.9 is a Notifier add-on that will send an email or SMS text message based on rules that the user specifies, so motion sensor activity could trigger a text message, for example. Accompanying the Gateway release is the 0.12 release of the WebThings Framework. It has made some changes to the Web Thing API to more closely align it with the recent W3C WoT Thing Description draft.

Centralizing IoT handling on a system controlled by the user is an admirable goal. The IoT world has so far proven to be an insecure morass of competing lock-in plays, or so it seems to this cynical observer. Wresting control of the devices from the manufacturers and placing it in the hands of their owners seems like an excellent step forward. Hopefully Mozilla sticks with this project for the long haul and that it gets the community support that it surely deserves—and needs.

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A Collection Of The Ultimate Web Browsers For Ubuntu

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Web browsers are vital if you're going to have any sort of online experience on your computer. There are hundreds of choices out there, as well as the standard browser which will come pre-installed on your computer, but that's often not the best choice, and it can be quite an intimidating task to sift through every dodgy review site on the internet to try and find the right browser for you. Ending up with a Downloads folder filled with installers and a desktop littered with icons isn't what you want or need, so this collection of web browsers for Ubuntu should be able to help you decide on which one you want before you go and download every single browser available on the internet.

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Immutable Linux with Silverblue: My favorite superpower

Filed under
Red Hat

I’m a recent but dedicated convert to Silverblue, which I run on my main home laptop, and which I’ll be putting onto my work laptop when I’m due a hardware upgrade in a few months’ time. I wrote an article about Silverblue over at Enable Sysadmin, and over the weekend, I moved the laptop that one of my kids has over to it as well. In terms of usability, look, and feel, Silverblue is basically a version of Fedora. There’s one key difference, however, which is that the operating system is mounted read-only, meaning that it’s immutable.

What does "immutable" mean? It means that it can’t be changed. To be more accurate, in a software context, it generally means that something can’t be changed during run time.

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Guix Makes Bitcoin Core Development More Trustless

Filed under
GNU
Security

According to Dong, “Guix allows users to verify that the Bitcoin Core client they download corresponds exactly to the code that Bitcoin Core developers write. It mitigates attacks that target the way we turn our codebase into the client executables we release.”

In spite of the clear focus on the needs of developers, Guix is also something that users may need and want to use if they choose to be cautious about the software that they run.

At press time, Guix is only available for Ubuntu builds.

Read more

13MP MIPI-CSI2 cam plugs into Variscite i.MX8M board

Filed under
Linux

E-con has launched a 13-megapixel, 4-lane MIPI-CSI2 “e-CAM130_iMX8M” camera designed to work with Variscite’s DART-MX8M eval kit. Future models will support Variscite’s i.MX8M Mini, i.MX8X and i.MX8 QuadMax based boards.

E-con Systems announced a collaboration with embedded board vendor Variscite to provide cameras optimized for its Linux-driven, NXP i.MX8-powered compute modules. For starters, E-con has launched a $199 e-CAM130_iMX8M camera that connects to the evaluation kit for Variscite’s i.MX8M-equipped DART-MX8M module.

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today's howtos

KDE Frameworks 5.61, Applications 19.08 in FreeBSD

Recent releases were KDE Frameworks 5.61 and KDE Applications 19.08. These have both landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree, after Tobias did most of the work and I pushed the big red button. Your FreeBSD machine will need to be following current ports – not the quarterly release branches, since we don’t backport to those. All the modern bits have arrived, maintaining the KDE-FreeBSD team’s commitment to up-to-date software for the FreeBSD desktop. The one thing we’re currently lagging on is Qt 5.13. There’s a FreeBSD problem report tracking that update. Read more

Dev branch moving towards Qt 6

As you know, Qt 5.14 will be branched pretty soon. After that I would expect that most new development work would start to be aimed towards Qt 6. As it looks right now, 5.15 will be a smaller release where we polish what we have in 5.14, and prepare some things for Qt 6. To reflect that and help us all understand that the development focus is now towards Qt 6, I would like to propose that dev becomes the Qt 6 branch after we branched away 5.14 (and we merge wip/qt6 back into dev). We can then either create a 5.15 branch at the same time, or slightly later, once 5.14 has stabilised a bit more (e.g. after the beta or RC). Read more Also: Qt's Development Branch To Begin Forming Qt 6

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