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Friday, 18 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:48pm
Story [Pictures] Samsung Z (SM-Z910F) Tizen in Gold Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:27pm
Story Chromecast Now Lets Users Move Android Content to Their TVs Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:10pm
Story Faults in Linux 2.6 Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:07pm
Story KDecoration2 – The road ahead Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 8:57pm
Story Kerala Legislature moves to open source software; LibreOffice Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 8:09pm
Story Could we See a Linux Tablet Brought to Life with Ubuntu Touch? Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 7:47pm
Story Docker networking: How Linux containers will change your network Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 7:43pm
Story MicroXwin Creators Have A PC That Runs Debian & Android Together Rianne Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 6:27pm
Story GCC Code Gets Updated For Go 1.3 Language Rianne Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 6:19pm

Test May Measure Students' Web Wisdom

Filed under
Misc

Students apply to college online, e-mail their papers to their professors and, when they want to be cheeky, pass notes in class by text-messaging. But that doesn't necessarily mean they have a high Internet IQ.

Barbecue chain buys porn Web site for $6G

Filed under
Web

Surfers trying to find the barbecue chain Sticky Fingers on the Internet no longer face the possibility of ending up at a much saucier Web site.

Adult site sues Amazon over sexy images

Filed under
Legal

Adult magazine publisher Perfect 10 is suing Amazon.com, alleging that the e-tailer's search engine is violating copyright law by displaying thousands of images from its Web site without permission.

50% Windows PCs Owned in 12 Minutes

Filed under
Microsoft

An unprotected Windows PC (without either firewall or antivirus protection) stands a 50 per cent chance of infection by a worm after just 12 minutes online.

TUX Issue #4 Available

Filed under
Misc

The July issue of TUX is now available for you to download.

This issue features:

*From the Publisher: Easy Does It
*From the Editor: How to Make Linux Perfect for the Desktop
*Letters to the Editor
*Q&A with Mango Parfait
*HomePlate: Let a Tomboy Manage Your Notes
*Suited Up: Getting Started with OpenOffice.org Calc

Final Voting in 2005 Readers' Choice Awards

Filed under
Misc

The final round of voting in the 2005 Linux Journal Readers' Choice awards begins today (well, ...err, yesterday), June 30 . The final ballot is based on the results of two previous rounds of open voting.

Would M$ buy an adware firm?

Filed under
Microsoft

The latest M&A rumor to spill from the mill is that Microsoft Corp is thinking about splashing out $500m on Claria Corp, the pre-IPO adware firm better known under its old name, Gator.

Copycat lawsuits target Intel

Filed under
Legal

On the heels of Advanced Micro Devices' antitrust litigation against Intel, the chip giant was hit Thursday with two copycat lawsuits.

Now playing on Google: Matrix, Family Guy

Filed under
Web

Google's new video search tool is turning out to be a little more expansive than the company planned, with users uploading copyrighted content ranging from the last Matrix movie to the Family Guy cartoons.

Beijing clinic ministers to online addicts

Filed under
Misc

The 12 teenagers and young adults, some in ripped jeans and baggy T-shirts, sit in a circle, chewing gum and fidgeting as they shyly introduce themselves.

BitTorrent may be next target for copyright cops

Filed under
Legal

U.S. content companies are riding high this week after their courtroom victory over illicit file-sharing networks, and the popular BitTorrent software may be next in their crosshairs.

Judge Won't Throw Out SCO Slander Lawsuit

Filed under
Legal

A federal judge refused to throw out The SCO Group's slander-of-title lawsuit against another Utah technology company, Novell Inc.

M$ settles IBM antitrust claims

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft and IBM have settled outstanding legal claims stemming from the U.S. government's antitrust against the former in the mid-1990s.

M$ Confirms Code Execution Hole in IE

Filed under
Microsoft

M$ confirmed a security flaw in its dominant Internet Explorer browser could be potentially exploited by malicious hackers to take "take complete control of the affected system.

U.S. Won't Cede Control of Net Computers

Filed under
Web

The U.S. government will indefinitely retain oversight of the main computers that control traffic on the Internet, ignoring calls by some countries to turn the function over to an international body, a senior official said Thursday.

Adware companies not breaking law

Filed under
Web

Adware companies do not break trademark laws when they use a retailer's Web address to trigger coupons and other ads for rivals' products, a federal appeals court has found.

Feds Target Internet Piracy Organizations

Filed under
Web

The government announced an 11-nation crackdown yesterday on Internet piracy organizations responsible for stealing copies of the latest "Star Wars" film and other movies, games and software programs worth at least $50 million.

KDE Announces the 24 Google Projects

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Project and Google announce the 24 KDE projects selected for the "Summer of Code" project. The lucky students and the KDE e.V. will receive a total of $120,000 if they can complete their projects in the allotted two months.

XP Starter under the gun

Filed under
Microsoft

Even as Microsoft's low-cost version of Windows reaches more corners of the globe, some analysts are wondering whether it is hitting the mark.

IBM to Apple: Watt Me Worry?

Filed under
Mac

Apple said earlier this month that it will switch to Intel chips from PowerPC chips as IBM's future PowerPC processors' projected power consumption will make them too difficult to design into future Apple systems. But IBM begs to differ.

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More in Tux Machines

Apache Rya matures open source triple store database

The open source Apache Rya database effort is continuing to move forward as it reaches a new level of project maturity and acceptance. Rya (pronounced "ree-uh") is an RDF (resource description framework) triple store database. The project started at the U.S. government's Laboratory for Telecommunication Sciences with an initial research paper published in 2012. The project joined the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in 2015 as an incubated project, and in September 2019 achieved what is known as Top-Level Project status. The Top-Level status is an indication and validation of the project's maturity, code quality and community. The ASF is home to Hadoop, Spark and other widely used database and data management programs. Read more Also: Yahoo Groups is being prepared for shutdown, with all stored archives to be deleted on Dec 14

The Spectre Mitigation Impact For Intel Ice Lake With Core i7-1065G7

For those wondering if -- or how much -- of a performance impact mitigations still make regarding Spectre for Intel's long-awaited 10nm+ Ice Lake processors, here is the rundown on the mitigation state and the performance impact. One of the areas that Phoronix readers have requested testing on with the recent purchase of the Dell XPS 7390 with Core i7 1065G7 is regarding the mitigation state and performance. Ice Lake with its Sunny Cove microarchitecture -- similar to Cascade Lake -- is no longer affected by Meltdown, MDS, or L1TF / Foreshadow. Read more

Networking SBCs run Linux on quad -A53 and -A72 NXP LS chips

Forlinx’s sandwich-style OK1043A-C and OK1046A SBCs run Linux on NXP’s quad -A53 LS1043A and quad -A72 LS1046A SoCs, respectively, and offer a 10GbE port and up to 6x GbE ports with optional SFP. Forlinx has posted product pages for two similar COM Express modules and carrier boards that run Linux on NXP’s networking focused LS series processors. The FET1043A-C module taps the up to 1.6GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A53 LS1043A while the FET1046A-C uses the up to 1.8GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A72 LS1046A. All the processors are headless — without GPUs. Read more

Security: WireGuard, Birds and Updates

  • WireGuard Restored In Android's Google Play Store After Brief But Controversial Removal

    After Google dropped the open-source WireGuard app from their Play Store since it contained a donation link, the app has now been restored within Google's software store for Android users but without the donation option. The WireGuard app for Android makes it easy to setup the secure VPN tunnel software on mobile devices, similar to its port to iOS and other platforms. The WireGuard apps are free but have included a donation link to the WireGuard website should anyone wish to optionally make a donation to support the development of this very promising network tech.

  • Letting Birds scooters fly free

    At that point I had everything I need to write a simple app to unlock the scooters, and it worked! For about 2 minutes, at which point the network would notice that the scooter was unlocked when it should be locked and sent a lock command to force disable the scooter again. Ah well. So, what else could I do? The next thing I tried was just modifying some STM firmware and flashing it onto a board. It still booted, indicating that there was no sort of verified boot process. Remember what I mentioned about the throttle being hooked through the STM32's analogue to digital converters[3]? A bit of hacking later and I had a board that would appear to work normally, but about a minute after starting the ride would cut the throttle. Alternative options are left as an exercise for the reader. Finally, there was the component I hadn't really looked at yet. The Quectel modem actually contains its own application processor that runs Linux, making it significantly more powerful than any of the chips actually running the scooter application[4]. The STM communicates with the modem over serial, sending it an AT command asking it to make an SSL connection to a remote endpoint. It then uses further AT commands to send data over this SSL connection, allowing it to talk to the internet without having any sort of IP stack. Figuring out just what was going over this connection was made slightly difficult by virtue of all the debug functionality having been ripped out of the STM's firmware, so in the end I took a more brute force approach - I identified the address of the function that sends data to the modem, hooked up OpenOCD to the SWD pins on the STM, ran OpenOCD's gdb stub, attached gdb, set a breakpoint for that function and then dumped the arguments being passed to that function. A couple of minutes later and I had a full transaction between the scooter and the remote. The scooter authenticates against the remote endpoint by sending its serial number and IMEI. You need to send both, but the IMEI didn't seem to need to be associated with the serial number at all. New connections seemed to take precedence over existing connections, so it would be simple to just pretend to be every scooter and hijack all the connections, resulting in scooter unlock commands being sent to you rather than to the scooter or allowing someone to send fake GPS data and make it impossible for users to find scooters.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (poppler, sudo, and wordpress), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, and kernel), and SUSE (kernel and postgresql10).