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Tuesday, 28 Jan 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Chandler, an open-source personal information manager, hits its first public release

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Software

Chandler, an open-source personal information manager (PIM), has reached its first public release milestone, version 0.6, and is now available for download. Chandler aims to do for PIMs and calendaring applications what Firefox did for web browsers. Available for Windows, OSX and Linux, the application binary is a 60 MB download.

Time to explore Foxfire

Filed under
Software

For the most part I´m a Microsoft fan. But a while back I made a switch. And for me, that´s a big deal. I changed my "default browser" from Internet Explorer to Mozilla Firefox. So, why did I change?

Chinese lab to promote Linux standards

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Linux

A new Linux certification lab has been set up in China to ensure local Linux distributions observe common industry standards.

Bug Bounty Hunters Spot Flaw In Linux AV

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Security

3Com has identified a vulnerability in a popular Linux anti-virus program, the fourth time bug bounty hunters have cashed in on the reward the company's TippingPoint division pays for digging up software flaws.

Issues with Thunderbird 1.5

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Software

There are some issues with the new Thunderbird 1.5.

The most important: Uninstall your old versions of Thunderbird before running the installer for 1.5.

GPL 3: Pre-Release Buzz Centers on Patents, License Compatibility

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OSS

The first public draft of GNU General Public License 3.0 will be released at an event at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., on Monday, and open-source software advocates are hoping that effective provisions for software patents as well as GPL compatibility with other licenses will be prominent in the draft.

Formation of the KDE Technical Working Group in Progress

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KDE

The first Technical Working Group for KDE is now being formed, with elections due over the next few weeks. The Group will help the hundreds of KDE contributors come to technical decisions and smooth processes such as major releases. It will also provide technical guidance to KDE contributors.

Fire Up your own Linux Server

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HowTos

Installing a Linux distribution can be both exhilarating and frustrating. My first two attempts at Linux installs-the first in 1996, the second in 1997-were unsuccessful. Installation routines and hardware support in Linux at the time were much less advanced than they are today.

Ubuntu founder to speak at annual Debian conference

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Linux

Ubuntu Linux founder Mark Shuttleworth will give the annual report on his hot, Debian-based distro at the 2006 Debian Developers Conference (DebConf), set for May 14 through 22 in Oaxtepec, Mexico.

How to configure and use LIRC

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HowTos

LIRC is basically a small server which can decode or transmit infra-red signals. This is a tutorial about how to set up the LIRC server and how to use it in order to control your system or specific LIRC-enabled applications with a remote control. Examples of simple or more complicated setups are also provided.

Open Source for iTunes arrives

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OSS

ADHERENTS of the two new IT religions of the post modern age, Open Source and Apple, are set to clash over an idea being pushed forward by a bloke called Rob Lord.

Apache Releases Geronimo 1.0

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Software

The Apache Software Foundation's Geronimo project team has released the much-anticipated Geronimo 1.0 Java application server.

Linux Live CDs: All the Linux with None of the Commitment

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Linux

Nervous about installing Linux on your machine? Fear no more, because Live CD enables you to run the operating system without installing it. Bryan Hoff tells you what cool things you can do with Linux Live CD, and evaluates some great distributions such as SimplyMEPIS, SLAX, and Knoppix.

Previewing KDE 4

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KDE

Recently at a Linux show, John Littler saw a preview of a new version of KDE running on a KDE developer's laptop. The interface looked cleaner than before, and apparently there was a whole raft of new stuff under the hood. John recently interviewed KDE developer Aaron J. Seigo about the forthcoming KDE 4 (due in the fall) and also a little about the recent controversy surrounding the porting of KDE to operating systems other than Linux.

Study: 40 percent of Irish companies choose open source

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OSS

More than 40 percent of organizations in Ireland will use some form of open-source software in 2006, according to a study by iReach, a research company in Dublin.

Review: Grafpup Linux live CD for graphic designers

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Reviews

What would you get if you were to combine good graphic programs such as the GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP), Inkscape, and CinePaint with other open source biggies such as Scribus and Nvu? The answer: Grafpup Linux, a live CD heaven for all graphic designers.

Developer.com's Security Product of the Year Award

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Security

With the rising importance of implementing solid information security, one can imagine the proliferation of security products. Which one should you choose? What are your peers using, and why? Let me review the top five finalists for security products based on Developer.com's year-end product reviews. I'll end the discussion with 2005's winner. Here's what the industry is saying about five solid security products!

eThekwini municipality chooses open source

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OSS

The movement towards open-source software and standards in South Africa has received another boost from a government project, with the eThekwini (Durban) municipality basing its intranet and internet portal, Durban.gov.za, entirely on open-source tools.

CES 2006 Picks and Pans

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Sci/Tech

Last week I attended the 2006 Consumer Electronic Show (CES), which since the demise of Comdex has become the largest and most important trade show in the nation - not only for electronics, but for all technology. This year's show saw record attendance, which added to the energy and overall excitement of the event, but also jammed hotels, city streets and aisles on the show floor.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 RC is out

OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 is just around the corner. The team is publishing today the last milestone for current release cycle. OMLx 4.1 RC release is mostly bug fixing and update packages. Read more

Proprietary Software and Security Leftovers

  • FilelistCreator is a directory printer for Windows, macOS and Linux

    Many people organize their data into folders to quickly find what they want. The Windows operating system comes with default folders for images, videos, and downloads for example that many users of Windows use. Windows does not really provide good easily accessible options to compare the contents of two folders; this is especially the case if root folders contain hundreds of even thousands of files and folders.

  • Ragnarok Ransomware Targets Citrix ADC, Disables Windows Defender

    A new ransomware called Ragnarok has been detected being used in targeted attacks against unpatched Citrix ADC servers vulnerable to the CVE-2019-19781 exploit. Last week, FireEye released a report about new attacks exploiting the now patched Citrix ADC vulnerability to install the new Ragnarok Ransomware on vulnerable networks. When attackers can compromise a Citrix ADC device, various scripts would be downloaded and executed that scan for Windows computers vulnerable to the EternalBlue vulnerability. If detected, the scripts would attempt to exploit the Windows devices, and if successful, inject a DLL that downloads and installs the Ragnarok ransomware onto the exploited device.

  • The Risks and Potential Impacts Associated with Open Source [Ed: DevOps site gives a platform to Black Duck -- a Microsoft-connected FUD arm against FOSS]
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (iperf3, openjpeg2, and tomcat7), Mageia (ansible, c3p0, fontforge, glpi, gthumb, libbsd, libmediainfo, libmp4v2, libqb, libsass, mbedtls, opencontainers-runc, php, python-pip, python-reportlab, python3, samba, sysstat, tomcat, virtualbox, and webkit2), openSUSE (java-11-openjdk, libredwg, and sarg), Oracle (sqlite), Red Hat (libarchive, nss, and openjpeg2), Scientific Linux (sqlite), SUSE (nodejs6), and Ubuntu (cyrus-sasl2, linux, linux-aws, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-aws, linux-oem, mysql-5.7, mysql-8.0, tcpdump, and tomcat8).

  • Hacker Releases 500,000 IoT Credentials

    One of the biggest issues that IoT has is keeping everything secure. Putting devices online is a double-edged sword: it allows benevolent useful services to connect to it, but it can also allow malicious agents to harvest data from it. This was proven a few days ago when a list of 500,000 IoT credentials made their way onto the Internet. The list was posted on a hacker forum for anyone to see and use.

  • Apple is attending a meeting in Washington on Monday as a Board Member of the CARIN Alliance on Health Record Sharing

    The CARIN Alliance is meeting with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on Monday, January 27, 2020 at 3:00 pm ET in Washington, D.C., and representatives from Apple and Microsoft will be attending via phone. Apple is an official CARIN Alliance Board Member and what transpires on Monday could affect Apple's work positively regarding their Health Record-Sharing Platform beyond their current work with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

  • Big tech CEOs are learning the art of the filibuster

    But it’s clear that as prevailing sentiment about big tech companies has darkened, tech CEOs see increasingly little value in having meaningful public conversations. Instead, they grit their teeth through every question, treating every encounter as something in between a legal deposition and a hostage negotiation.

    We saw this in 2018, when the New Yorker profiled Mark Zuckerberg. We saw it again last year, when Jack Dorsey went on a podcast tour. At some point this year Tim Cook will probably give a zero-calorie interview to someone, and if it’s a slow-enough news day I’ll write this column for a fourth time.

Red Hat vs. SUSE vs. Canonical Contributions To The Mainline Linux Kernel Over The 2010s

After last week looking at the AMD/Intel/NVIDIA contributions to the mainline Linux kernel over the past number of years, there were reader requests for seeing how some of the top distributions compare namely Red Hat, SUSE, and Canonical. These graphs today are looking at the contributions by SUSE, Red Hat, and Canonical to the mainline Linux kernel. Keep in mind this is the Git commits made from using the respective corporate domains for each organization. Read more

Linux on AMD: Audio Issue Tackled and AMD Zen 3 CPU Support

  • AMD Prepares Fix To Address Clicking Issue With Audio Playback On Raven APUs

    Unfortunately it wasn't a trouble-free experience at launch but with time Raven Ridge APUs have been getting cleaned up on Linux for a pleasant experience, thanks in part to the Google Chromebook play that has also seen these newer AMD APUs seeing HDCP content protection support and PSP / TEE trusted execution functionality. The latest overdue improvement on the AMD Raven APU front is a fix for a pesky issue during audio playback. If playing audio streams immediately one after another, clicking noises can be heard. That is in the process of being resolved thanks to a new kernel patch.

  • AMD ZEN 3 CPU Added To Official Linux Kernel With ‘Family 19H’ Indicating Launch Of Next-Gen Processors With Higher IPC Gains?

    AMD’s ZEN 3 Architecture, the next-gen evolution of the company’s powerful CPUs, is now officially a part of the Linux Family. Spotted inside the Linux Kernel are direct references to the AMD’s Zen 3 CPU microcode. Given the recent developments about the as-yet-unannounced AMD Architecture that succeeds ZEN 2, it is quite likely the company could release the new CPUs based on ZEN 3 in the coming months. And, if the leaked benchmarks and test scores are to be believed, AMD has truly pushed its processors and managed to achieve a substantial leap in processor power with lesser power draw. After giving a tough competition to Intel last year, AMD appears to be readying a new lineup of CPUs that are based on the company’s latest Architecture, the ZEN 3. Based on the 7nm Fabrication Node, the Zen 3 is the 3rd iteration of the ZEN microarchitecture, which is built using the EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet) lithography process.

  • AMD Zen 3 CPU Support Added To Linux Kernel As We Get Closer To Official Announcement

    It looks like we are getting more closer to the launch of AMD's Zen 3 CPUs as microcode for the upcoming lineup has been added to the Linux Kernel, as spotted by Komachi. The AMD Zen 3 line of processors are aimed to hit in the coming quarters and it looks like they are going to be a bigger upgrade than we have anticipated as many leaks and official representatives have stated. [...] However, this means that in the upcoming months, AMD is definitely bringing us more news as also stated by AMD's CEO, Dr. Lisa Su, in the 'The Bring Up' interview where she states that Zen 3 architecture is doing really well, they are excited about it and that she looks forward to talking more about it later in 2020.