Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 17 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story RasPi magazine launches today – get your free downloads here Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2014 - 3:54pm
Story Flock Day One: Gijs Hillenius Keynote Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2014 - 3:42pm
Story Linux 3.17 Adds Support For Intel "Braswell" HD Audio Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2014 - 3:33pm
Story Input Drivers Get Renewed For Linux 3.17 Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2014 - 3:26pm
Story Zimbra CMO on being a great guardian of open source's three C's Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2014 - 2:49pm
Story Linux Foundation offers training scholarships Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2014 - 8:47am
Story Introducing Micah, summer intern for the Licensing Team Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2014 - 8:44am
Story Everyone's your partner in open source Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2014 - 8:31am
Story Docker comes to openSUSE Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2014 - 7:11am
Story The Connected Car, Part 1: The Future Starts Now - Will Linux Drive It? Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2014 - 6:57am

Java flaws open door to hackers

Filed under
Security

Sun Microsystems has fixed a pair of security bugs in Java that could be exploited by attackers to take over computers running Windows, Linux and Solaris.

The State Of Internet Security

Filed under
Web

While the scams that daily flood our e-mail in-boxes show no signs of abating, there is some good news for the users who have to sort through them all. So says VeriSign in its latest "State of Internet Security" address covering the first three months of 2005.

OpenSolaris Needs Time to Shine

Filed under
OS

Competitors and analysts are waiting to see whether possible Linux challenger OpenSolaris will build enough of a community to change Sun's business future.

M$ patches more holes

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft has released 10 security bulletins, three of them describing critical flaws that could let an attacker take complete control over a computer system

Yahoo! Buys Internet Phone Provider

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Yahoo Inc. said Tuesday it had acquired DialPad Communications Inc., a 6-year-old company whose software lets people to place calls over the Internet for a fraction of the cost of regular telephone service. New products from Yahoo that integrate DialPad technology could debut within a few months.

n/a

PCLinuxOS Preview-9

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews
-s

PCLinuxOS is a binary-based Linux distribution presented as a livecd that offers the user a beautiful fully functional complete desktop operating system. Unparalleled in beauty and functionality, PCLOS is perhaps the premier operating system of our time. To borrow a quote, "PCLinuxOS is one of the world’s up and coming providers of a Linux Desktop Solution. With a small but dedicated development team, PClinuxOS delivers Desktop Ready Software that harnesses the power of the Open Source Community."

PCLinuxOS Preview 9 Released

Filed under
PCLOS

According to distrowatch Preview 9 of PCLinuxOS has been released.

Infineon posts DDR 3 prototype to Intel

Filed under
Hardware

Infineon has become the latest memory maker to produce a working DDR 3 device. Its DDR 3 chips will shunt bits at 1600Mbps, double the top-end of the DDR 2 specification.

Online rush for Jackson news

Filed under
Web

Online news sites have been swamped by millions of people desperate to find out the verdict in the Michael Jackson trial. According to net measurement firm Hitwise, UK searches related to Michael Jackson soared in the last week to more than one in every 9,000 requests.

HP's U-turn

Filed under
Hardware

Hewlett-Packard on Monday separated its personal computer and printer group into stand-alone businesses, a move by new Chief Executive Mark Hurd to reverse one of Carly Fiorina's last acts as CEO.

A new answer to Internet pornography proliferation

Filed under
Web

A red-light district tentatively cleared for construction on the Internet — the ".xxx" domain — is being billed by backers as giving the $12 billion online porn industry a great opportunity to clean up its act. Anti-porn activist Donna Rice Hughes, however, remains unconvinced. "They are not going to give up their '.com' addresses," she said of porn sites. "It doesn't take a brain surgeon to figure that one out."

How a Corrupted USB Drive Was Saved by GNU/Linux

Filed under
Linux

My friend's brother had a 512MB Lexar Media Jumpdrive Pro USB drive that became corrupted after using it with Windows 2000. His IT department was able to get back some but not all of the file contents, but without any file names. On his own, he tried some recovery utilities, but all failed. Using a typical Linux distro--in this case SuSE 8.0--however, it wasn't hard to recover almost all of the data from the drive along with the filenames and to burn a CD-ROM of the contents.

No Threat to Linux with Apple and Intel Deal

Filed under
Linux
Mac

It shouldn't even threaten Linux by any means. Linux has more than a few things that go in its favor, at least for the time being. The idea of open-source software is an amazing one. The idea of running a system that costs absolutely nothing on the software side is a powerful one, and Windows and Mac OS X would have a difficult time competing against that.

linux on microsoft mn-700 router

Filed under
Sci/Tech

gather round folks and watch as reader liam beats a microsoft mn-700 router into submission. the router normally runs a windows ce based operating system and is considered problematic on its good days.

A deal made in Washington?

Filed under
Sci/Tech
Legal

Congressman Rick Boucher: If the MPAA expects Congress to ratify a rule that would limit the ability of ordinary consumers to share lawfully acquired digital broadcast television programs with one another, then it shouldn't be surprised if Congress insists that the MPAA accept in return a restoration of the fair use rights taken from consumers through the enactment of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

Data 'smuggling' opens websites to attack

Filed under
Security

Thousands of websites may be at risk from a new form of network attack that involves burying harmful packets of data within seemingly legitimate ones.

Rumoured Revolution specs hit the net

Filed under
Gaming

High definition won't be a part of the Revolution, says Nintendo, as specs "leak".

Sun begins open-source Solaris era

Filed under
OSS

Sun Microsystems is expected to release Solaris as open-source software Tuesday, a centerpiece of the company's plan to regain lost relevance and fend of rivals Red Hat, IBM and Microsoft.

Judge dismisses most of Novell's lawsuit against M$

Filed under
Microsoft

A U.S. district court judge has thrown out four counts in Novell's antitrust lawsuit against Microsoft, but let stand two other counts accusing the software giant of damaging Novell's business through monopolistic behavior.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

PCLinuxOS Gets November 2019 ISO with Refreshed Themes, Latest Updates

The PCLinuxOS community released their monthly ISO snapshots for November 2019, a release that contains all the latest bug and security updates, as well as various improvements. PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is out now as the latest and most up to date installation medium for this independently developed and user-friendly GNU/Linux distribution, including a fully updated system with all the updates released as of November 12th, 2019, with refreshed themes for GRUB, bootsplash, and the desktop. PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is available in there different edition, with the KDE Plasma 5, Xfce, and MATE desktop environments. The PCLinuxOS 2019.11 KDE edition ships with the latest KDE Plasma 5.17.3 desktop environment, as well as the KDE Applications 19.08.3 and KDE Frameworks 5.64.0 open-source software suites. Read more

Programming: GCC, RcppEigen and Python

  • Introduce a new GCC option, --record-gcc-command-line
    I would like to propose the following patches which introduce a compile option --record-gcc-command-line. When passed to gcc, it saves the command line option into the produced object file. The option makes it trivial to trace back how a file was compiled and by which version of the gcc. It helps with debugging, reproducing bugs and repeating the build process.
    
    This option is similar to -frecord-gcc-switches. However, they have three fundamental differences: Firstly, -frecord-gcc-switches saves the internal state after the argv is processed and passed by the driver. As opposed to that, --record-gcc-command-line saves the command-line as received by the driver. Secondly, -frecord-gcc-switches saves the switches as separate entries into a mergeable string section. Therefore, the entries belonging to different object files get mixed up after being linked. The new --record-gcc-command-line, on the other hand, creates one entry per invocation. By doing so, it makes it clear which options were used together in a single gcc invocation. Lastly, --record-gcc-command-line also adds the version of the gcc into this single entry to make it clear which version of gcc was called with any given command line. This is useful in cases where .comment section reports multiple versions.
    
    While there are also similarities between the implementations of these two options, they are completely independent. These commands can be used separately or together without issues. I used the same section that -frecord-gcc-switches uses on purpose. I could not use the name -frecord-gcc-command-line for this option; because of a {f*} in the specs, which forwards all options starting with -f to cc1/cc1plus as is. This is not we want for this option. We would like to append it a filename as well to pass the argv of the driver to child processes.
    
    This functionality operates as the following: It saves gcc's argv into a temporary file, and passes --record-gcc-command-line <tempfilename> to cc1 or cc1plus. The functionality of the backend is implemented via a hook. This patch includes an example implementation of the hook for elf targets: elf_record_gcc_command_line function. This function reads the given file and writes gcc's version and the command line into a mergeable string section, .GCC.command.line.
    
    
  • GCC Developers Discuss New Option For Recording Compiler Flags / Details In Binaries

    GCC developers recently have been discussing a new proposal over an option for preserving the command-line flags/options used when building a binary as well as the associated compiler version. The proposal sent out last week was over a --record-gcc-command-line option to save the compiler options into the produced object file. The proposal is in the name of helping debugging, reproducing bugs, and repeating build process. There is already a -frecord-gcc-switches option that is somewhat similar in behavior but with key differences as explained in the proposal.

  • RcppEigen 0.3.3.7.0

    A new minor release 0.3.3.7.0 of RcppEigen arrived on CRAN today (and just went to Debian too) bringing support for Eigen 3.3.7 to R. This release comes almost a year after the previous minor release 0.3.3.5.0. Besides the upgrade to the new upstream version, it brings a few accumulated polishes to the some helper and setup functions, and switches to the very nice tinytest package for unit tests; see below for the full list. As before, we carry a few required changes to Eigen in a diff.

  • “Higher Performance Python” at PyDataCambridge 2019

    I’ve had the pleasure of speaking at the first PyDataCambridge conference (2019), this is the second PyData conference in the UK after PyDataLondon (which colleagues and I co-founded 6 years back). I’m super proud to see PyData spread to 6 regional meetups and now 2 UK conferences.

today's howtos

Games: Baba, Dicey Dungeons, Factorio and Enabling GameMode

  • Excellent rule-changing puzzle game Baba Is You is getting an official level editor

    Baba Is You, the truly excellent puzzle game where you have to break the rules of each level to beat them is getting a big update soon. See Also: previous thoughts on it here. How do you break these rules? Well, on each level there's logic blocks you can push around to change everything. Turn yourself into a rock, a jellyfish, make it so touching a wall wins instead of a flag you can't access and all kinds of really crazy things it becomes quite hilarious.

  • Dicey Dungeons outsold Terry Cavanagh's last two Steam games in the first month

    Terry Cavanagh, the indie developer behind VVVVVV, Super Hexagon and the latest Dicey Dungeons has a new blog post out talking about how well Dicey Dungeons has done and what's to come next. Leading up to the release, Cavanagh was doing a blog post each day for seven days. This latest post from yesterday then, is long overdue considering Dicey Dungeons launched in August.

  • Factorio is leaving Early Access in September next year

    As a result of the team behind Factorio feeling like it's going on for too long, they've now set a proper release date. In their latest Friday Facts update, they mentioned how their "when it's done" approach has served them well to create a high-quality game "but if we continued this way, we would be doing it basically forever". Part of the issue is that they want to work on new features and add content, instead of constant polishing. So they're setting a date publicly now "so we have to stick with it". With that in mind, it's going to leave Early Access on September 25, 2020. Development is not ending once they hit the big 1.0, they also don't want to say it's 100% finished either. Like a lot of games, as long as the money keeps coming in they will likely keep adding to it.

  • Enabling GameMode on Linux for best gaming performance