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Wednesday, 20 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Security breach could affect 40 million

Filed under
Security

A security breach of customer information at a credit card-processing company could expose to fraud up to 40 million cardholders of multiple brands, MasterCard International Inc. said Friday.

Top PC games can end up in bargain bin

Filed under
Gaming

Sometimes good computer games fall through the cracks because of weak marketing, too many other titles coming out at the same time or lack of consumer interest because the games aren't from a hot genre.

Mdv Aims to Become Linux-Desktop Player

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva, with the recent purchase of Lycoris, a U.S. Linux desktop distributor, is expanding rapidly, but analysts ask whether it's growing fast enough to compete with the major Linux vendors: Red Hat and Novell/SuSE.

Secret life of the OpenSolaris code

Filed under
OS

Although incidences of profanity and swearing are rare in the ten million lines of the newly-released OpenSolaris code, the ones that do exist reveal programmers' frustration with their art.

Sony's PSP to get first pornos

Filed under
Misc

The PlayStation Portable (PSP), the hand-held version of Sony's popular home game machine, will soon be opened up to a new and potentially lucrative market -- porn.

Will computing flow like electricity?

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Business writer Nicholas G. Carr raised many hackles in the information technology industry when he published a piece titled "IT Doesn't Matter" in 2003. His latest piece with a similarly extreme headline, "The End of Corporate Computing," reopens the discussion of utility computing.

Crime, but no punishment for M$

Filed under
Microsoft

Who's in charge of a system where the guilty set their own sentence?

You've been swindled. The conman is caught and brought to trial. Guilty, says the jury. "Guilty, by Jove!" says the judge. "As this is by no means your first offence, I sentence you to... well, what would you like?"

Open Source - Opens Doors

Filed under
OSS

Early in my GIS career, I wanted to produce digital maps at home. Of course, I couldn't use tools I had access to at work due to licensing and cost restrictions. This led me to investigate open source GIS and mapping alternatives. I dove in and never looked back.

1/5 of Web Users Prefer Online News

Filed under
Web

Nearly one-fifth of Web users who read newspapers now prefer online to offline editions, according to a new study from Internet audience measurement company Nielsen//NetRatings.

Congress urged to boost identity theft safeguards

Filed under
Security

It takes only a few seconds for your financial identity to be stolen, but months to get it back and clean up the credit mess. Aware of consumers' frustration and fear, the government wants Congress to consider more protections.

Nvidia cuts gpu prices

Filed under
Hardware

Nvidia recently lowered the price of its GeForce 6200 with TurboCache by US$15, according to sources at Taiwan graphics-card makers. In addition, the company cut the price on its GeForce 6600 series US$5 and the prices for all parts from its GeForce 6200, GeForce FX5200 and GeForce MX4000 series were reduced US$1-2, indicated the sources.

Activist Faces Charges Over Web Posts

Filed under
Web

A Chinese political activist goes on trial next week on subversion charges after posting essays and lyrics to a punk song on the Internet, a human rights group said Thursday.

Revoltec 512MB USB 2.0 File Carrier

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

Revoltec has recently released a distinct USB flash drive, the File Carrier, which was given attention on aesthetics, since it comes in 3 colors and features a nice design. I was lucky enough to be sent a 512MB File Carrier drive, a red version, so let us see if it can perform as well as it looks!

UK infrastructure under Trojan attack

Filed under
Security

The UK's key computer systems are being targeted by Trojan software apparently originating from the Far East, firewalls and antivirus software useless, warns UK security agency.

M$ meets hackers, asks for help

Filed under
Microsoft

In the name of education, the software giant invites security researchers to infiltrate its systems.

Gentoo founder to 'educate' M$

Filed under
Gentoo
Microsoft

Microsoft has hired one of the key figures behind a popular distribution of Linux in order to educate its in-house developers about open source.

Building a New Computer System for Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos
by Gary Frankenbery, Computer Science Teacher, Grants Pass High School

Going to build a new computer soon, and outfit it with Linux? Here's the story of one such recent foray into purchasing components and assembling a new system.

n/a

An Interview with Linus Torvalds

Filed under
Linux

We wanted to interview Linus Torvalds because all the computers at our school run Linux. Mr. Torvalds lives in our neighborhood so we sent him an email and asked for an interview.

So what happens when Linus Torvalds sits down with a high school freshman for an interview? You get to hear what every 15 year-old wants to know about our favorite open source software developer.

Joseph Cheek speaks about Mandriva's acquisition of Lycoris

Filed under
MDV

Desktop Linux distributor Lycoris has been acquired by Mandriva, the company resulting from the April merger of Mandrake and Conectiva. We asked Lycoris founder Joseph Cheek what the deal means for current and future Lycoris and Mandriva users and developers.

Here's what DesktopLinux.com learned . . .

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux Kernel Security in a Nutshell: How to Secure Your Linux System

The Linux kernel is the core component of the Linux operating system, maintaining complete control over everything in the system. It is the interface between applications and data processing at the hardware level, connecting the system hardware to the application software. The kernel manages input/output requests from software, memory, processes, peripherals and security, among other hefty responsibilities. Needless to say, the Linux kernel is pretty important. However, with power comes great responsibility, and the Linux kernel is no exception to this rule. Kernel security is critical: it determines the security of the Linux operating system as a whole, as well as the security of every individual system that runs on Linux. Vulnerabilities in the kernel can have serious implications for Linux users, and it is extremely important that users stay up-to-date on news and advisories pertaining to kernel security. Read more

Mozilla: Webcompat, Firefox 71, Privacy Advice and Rust

  • Karl Dubost: Saving Webcompat images as a microservice

    Thinking out loud on separating our images into a separate service. The initial goal was to push the images to the cloud, but I think we could probably have a first step. We could keep the images on our server, but instead of the current save, we could send them to another service, let say upload.webcompat.com with a HTTP PUT. And this service would save them locally.

  • Multiple-column Layout and column-span in Firefox 71

    Firefox 71 is an exciting release for anyone who cares about CSS Layout. While I am very excited to have subgrid available in Firefox, there is another property that I’ve been keeping an eye on. Firefox 71 implements column-span from Multiple-column Layout. In this post I’ll explain what it is and a little about the progress of the Multiple-column Layout specification. Multiple-column Layout, usually referred to as multicol, is a layout method that does something quite different to layout methods such as flexbox and grid. If you have some content marked up and displaying in Normal Flow, and turn that into a multicol container using the column-width or column-count properties, it will display as a set of columns. Unlike Flexbox or Grid however, the content inside the columns flows just as it did in Normal Flow. The difference is that it now flows into a number of anonymous column boxes, much like content in a newspaper.

  • The Mozilla Blog: Can Your Holiday Gift Spy on You?

    Mozilla today launches the third-annual *Privacy Not Included, a report and shopping guide identifying which connected gadgets and toys are secure and trustworthy — and which aren’t. The goal is two-fold: arm shoppers with the information they need to choose gifts that protect the privacy of their friends and family. And, spur the tech industry to do more to safeguard consumers. Mozilla researchers reviewed 76 popular connected gifts available for purchase in the United States across six categories: Toys & Games; Smart Home; Entertainment; Wearables; Health & Exercise; and Pets. Researchers combed through privacy policies, sifted through product and app specifications, reached out to companies about their encryption and bug bounty programs, and more. As a result, we can answer questions like: How accessible is the privacy policy, if there is one? Does the product require strong passwords? Does it collect biometric data? And, Are there automatic security updates?

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 313

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

Graphics and GPUS: NVIDIA, Intel and Vulkan

  • CUDA 10.2 Released With VMM APIs, libcu++ As Parallel Standard C++ Library For GPUs

    NVIDIA has released CUDA 10.2 for SuperComputing 19 week. CUDA 10.2 comes with some interesting changes, including to be the last release that will support Apple's macOS and the introduction of a standard C++ library for GPUs.

  • Intel Iris Plus Ice Lake Graphics Run Great With Mesa 19.3's Gallium3D Driver

    While Mesa 19.3 was the original target for switching to the Intel Gallium3D driver by default for Broadwell and newer, they shifted that goal to Mesa 20.0 to allow more time for testing and ensuring a bug-free experience as users transition from the classic "i965" driver over to "Iris" Gallium3D. But even so if running with Mesa 19.3 today it means better performance for Ice Lake as well as Gen8 and Gen9 hardware too.

  • Vulkan post-processing layer vkBasalt has a new release up with SMAA support

    Continuing to boost the feature set of the post-processing layer for vkBasalt, a new release is up and it appears we missed a few smaller in-between releases too. Version 0.2.0 was released yesterday, adding in support for SMAA which is a higher-quality form of anti-aliasing which can be enabled in the config file. With that in vkBasalt now supports: Contrast Adaptive Sharpening, Fast Approximate Anti-Aliasing and Enhanced Subpixel Morphological Anti-Aliasing so it's advancing quite quickly.