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Thursday, 21 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OnePlus coming to India! Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 8:23pm
Story Ripe Linux Nits To Pick Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 8:06pm
Story GCC Receives ACM’s 2014 Programming Languages Software Award Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 5:32pm
Story Six Clicks: The best Linux desktop environments Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 5:28pm
Story Cauldron 2014: GCC & LLVM Will Look To Collaborate More Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 5:21pm
Story Linus Torvalds On GCC 4.9: Pure & Utter Crap Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 5:11pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 4:38pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 1:23pm
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 1:23pm
Story GOG's Mistaken Giveaway, Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS, and Wayland in KDE Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 6:03am

Open Source Unwrapped

Filed under
OSS

One of the most important aspects of open source is its power and potential. Whenever the best minds in an industry join forces to create value, the potential is enormous. This has happened with space, cancer research, and the initial Internet itself. There are also political ramifications behind the open source movement. One can draw parallels between the open source movement and the open systems movement of the late 1980s. The open systems movement was intended to loosen IBM's stranglehold on computing. Likewise, the open source movement may well have its roots in loosening Microsoft's grip on power.

Bionic suit offers wearers super-strength

Filed under
Sci/Tech

We can rebuild them, we have the technology... for less than $20000US.

Training a new breed of hacker

Filed under
Software

The traditional approach to fight hacking is to ban it. In Barcelona however, the war against the hackers has taken a new turn.

Tamil Nadu student bags IBM Linux prize

Filed under
Linux

Chennai, A Tamil Nadu student from India has been declared winner of IBM's Linux Scholar Challenge for 2004.

Gamers may get better explosions through science

Filed under
Gaming

To a physics fan like Manju Hegde, even today's best video games look fake. That's because game creators haven't taken the time to calculate the physics that govern the behavior of objects such as falling bricks.

"We think a game should be like the 'Star Trek' holodeck."

Microsoft warms up for patch Tuesday

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

Microsoft is to release a slew of new patches on 12 April as part of its monthly upgrade cycle, the company said in a posting on its website.

INTEL to launch dual-core Pentium 'next week'

Filed under
Hardware

Ha! /Now/ intel is suddenly gonna release their dual core chip much earlier than originally planned. I don't know what's funnier, the M$ vs Linux or the Intel vs. AMD.

"Intel may launch its upcoming dual-core Pentium processors and their supporting chipsets sooner than anticipated, with the products now set to debut this month, possibly as early as next week."

Who should maintain open source projects?

Filed under
OSS

Two different approaches to managing open source projects are emerging: one is community supported and developed, the other is commercial. Which will be around for the long haul?

theinquirer covers Mandrake Change

Filed under
MDV

theinquirer says, "Male duck to Italian car you know it makes sense." lol... anyway, here's their blurb.

AU Government to use open source to break lock-ins

Filed under
OSS

IT vendors pushing costly proprietary software lock-ins have been warned that feeding at the $4.2 billion IT trough of the Australian taxpayer is over and a strict and a new procurement diet for vendors will be personally enforced by the Special Minister of State, Senator Eric Abetz.

VCs Back Open-Source Upstarts

Filed under
OSS

Kim Polese has a history of spotting a hot tech market and getting venture capitalists to pony up the money to back her ideas. After making a tech-boom splash in the 1990s with Marimba Inc., Polese now has her sights set on an emerging area of the open-source software market that has investors dusting off their checkbooks.

Mills: Microsoft Is Just "Saber-Rattling"

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

The IBM exec says Big Blue's collaboration software is the real deal, whereas Redmond's efforts don't even come close.

Eight new patches from Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

Microsoft will release eight Patches For Windows, Office, Exchange, and MSN Messenger, at least half of which will be marked "critical."

Stolen computers contain data on 185,000 patients

Filed under
Security

A San Jose-based medical practice has notified about 185,000 current and former patients about the theft of their personal information contained on two computers stolen from its offices during a burglary March 28. The computers contained names, addresses, confidential medical information and Social Security numbers.

Maine man sentenced to 6 years for eBay scam

Filed under
Security

A 21-year-old man was sentenced to more than six years in prison and assessed $118,000 in restitution for perpetrating an extensive Internet fraud scheme, according to the U.S. attorney's office in Maine.

"We're glad he's going to jail," an Ebay spokesman said.

Taking the Plunge into Linux

Filed under
Linux

Matt Leppard of the Bangkok Post describes his journey to using Linux as an alternative to Windows or Mac. He says, "You're probably wondering why in the world I've chosen to use Linux. Well, first it was out of curiosity. Having seen it in action, I really wanted to try it. And now that I have, I'll stick with it."

MIT & Quanta to Team Up

Filed under
Hardware

Mark Jewell writes, "Quanta Computer Inc. and the Massachussets Institute of Technology said Friday they are teaming up on a $20 million, five-year project to get PCs, laptops, cell phones, and handhelds to work together seamlessly, intuitively and in sync."

First cell phone was a true 'brick'

Filed under
Sci/Tech

On this slow news day, Dave Carpenter looks back to 1983 when the ground breaking Motorola DynaTAC, $3,995 2-pound brick hit the market.

Krolopp, now 74 and retired, still gets a "warm fuzzy feeling" thinking about the DynaTAC and knowing that "a handful of us did something that was really significant."

Performance Tweaks & Tips

Filed under
Howtos

Has your system seemed to have slowed down lately or perhaps it never performed the way you thought it should. Do you ever exclaim, seems my friend's computer is much faster than mine... or the dreaded, my XP is faster than linux? Bite your tongue and check out a few things on your gentoo install.

I don my asbestos house robe and share a few things I've learned from my time with gentoo. Actually these principals can be applied to any linux installation, but I had gentoo in mind when writing them.

Earth's oldest object on display

Filed under
Sci/Tech

A tiny grain of crystal thought to the oldest object on Earth has gone on public display for one day only in the US state of Wisconsin. The zircon, found in Australia in 2001, led to a reappraisal of early Earth. It suggests the early Earth was much cooler than previously thought, meaning life-forming elements such as oceans were formed earlier too.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Games: Parkitect, Warlords I + II, FPS Counter in GNU/Linux Games

  • Parkitect - Taste of Adventure is out expanding your theme park building possibilities

    Possibly one of the most relaxing and engrossing games release last year, Parkitect just expanded with a free update and a big Parkitect - Taste of Adventure DLC.

  • Warlords I + II given the DOSBox and DRM-free treatment over on GOG

    Sometimes a lot of newer strategy games can be a bit much, perhaps a little retro flavour is in order? Warlords I + II, two strategy titles from the 90's are now on GOG. Both of them have been nicely packaged up for Linux gamers so you can just buy them both together, install and then it will run with a pre-configured DOSBox with no hassle. That's the way I like my retro gaming to be, a solid bit of nostalgia without some headaches.

  • How to Show FPS Counter in Linux Games

    Linux gaming got a major push when Valve announced Linux support for Steam client and their games in 2012. Since then, many AAA and indie games have made their way to Linux and the number of users who game on Linux have increased considerably. With the growth of Linux gaming, many users started to look for proper ways to display “frames per second” (FPS) counter as an overlay on running Linux games. An FPS counter helps in tweaking performance of running games as well as in benchmarking a PC’s overall ability to play games at different resolutions. Unfortunately there is no single unified way to display FPS counter in all Linux games that is independent of underlying technologies a game is running upon. Different renderers and APIs have different ways to display FPS counter. This guide will explain various methods that can be used to display an FPS counter in Linux games.

today's leftovers

  • NVIDIA DP MST Audio To Begin Working With The Linux 5.5 Kernel

    While the official NVIDIA Linux driver has worked well with DisplayPort Multi-Stream Transport (DP MST) setups for years now for driving large displays, audio hasn't worked under Linux for NVIDIA's driver in this combination. But with the upcoming Linux 5.5 cycle that will be addressed.

  • Fedora Update Weeks 39–45

    Somehow, my semi-weekly updates turned into monthly things. Mostly, updates per week have been rather light and stable, so it always seemed that there was no need to write an update. Of course, that ends up meaning one really large update after a long time. This past week was pretty busy, so I thought it best to finally write up a post. One small changeset was removing automated Suggests from R packages when they do not exist in Fedora yet. This is due to legal concerns on the F31 Change for automated R dependencies. So far, I’ve fixed mine, and intend to fix others’ soon. On the Python 2 front, aside from dropping unused subpackages from Fedora 32, I’ve also ported git-cinnabar’s test running from nose to unittest. This makes it easier to get the Python 2 exception. Since upstream is working on Python 3 support, I expect that this exception won’t need to be in place for long.

  • Zekr Quran (1.1.0 Final) on linux (Fedora 30)

    It work fine on Java 6 era but not anymore. You need to tweak, hack, compile you self or find package alternative. I want to build this software as RPM package so it will be available for others but maybe it will take lot of effort.. plus there is issue about licensing, humm.. maybe next time? Anyway, If you are looking for solution how to install Zekr on Fedora, just let me know. I will help.

  • Magicsee N5 Plus Amlogic S905X3 TV Box Comes with a 2.5″ SATA HDD/SSD Bay

    Amlogic S905X3 TV boxes have been announced since June. S905X3 is Amlogic’s first Arm Cortex-A55 processor and targets 4K UHD HDR TV boxes The box runs Android 9.0, and ships with an IR remote control, a power supply, an HDMI cable, and a user manual in English. There’s CLOSE/OPEN switch to open the lid and install the drive, so no tools appear to be needed to install a hard drive.

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: November Edition

    As anticipated in previous reports, the release cycles are getting progressively shorter, in order to reach a consistent 4 weeks length in the first half of 2020. Firefox 71 will be released next week, on December 3rd. At that point Firefox 72 will move to beta, and the deadline to ship updates for that version will be on December 24th. Firefox 71 will ship with 3 new languages: Catalan (Valencian) (ca-valencia), Tagalog (tl), and Triqui (trs).

  • Better math import from PPTX into Impress

    Impress now has a much improved math handling in its importer from PPTX, eliminating annoying duplicated objects you had to delete after import, manually. First, thanks TU Dresden who made this work by Collabora possible.

Programming Leftovers

  • Faster Winter 4: Export lists

    Without an export, the compiler has to assume that every top-level function can possibly called from the outside, even functions that you think of as “internal”. If you have a function that you do not export, like instr, step_work and step after my change, the compiler can see all the places the function is called. If the function is only called in one place, it may inline it (copy its definition into where it is called), and simplify the code around the edges. And even if it does not inline the function, it might learn something about how the functions are used, and optimize them based on that (e.g. based on Demand Analysis).

  • Ondřej Holý: How to call asynchronous function synchronously

    GLib provides a lot of asynchronous functions, especially to deal with I/O. Unfortunately, some functions don’t have synchronous equivalents and the code has to be split into several callbacks. This is not handy in some cases. My this year’s GSoC student recently asked me whether it is possible to create synchronous function from asynchronous. He is currently working on test suite and don’t want to split test cases into several callbacks. So I decided to write a blog spot about as it might be handy for more people.

  • Sort list alphabetically with python

    You will be given a vector of string(s). You must sort it alphabetically (case-sensitive!!) and then return the first value. The returned value must be a string and have “***” between each of its letters. You should not remove or add elements from/to the array. Above is another problem in codewars, besides asking us to sort the array list and returning the first value in that list, we also need to insert stars within the characters.

  • Abolishing SyntaxError: invalid syntax ...

    Do you remember when you first started programming (possibly with Python) and encountered an error message that completely baffled you? For some reason, perhaps because you were required to complete a formal course or because you were naturally persistent, you didn't let such messages discourage you entirely and you persevered. And now, whenever you see such cryptic error messages, you can almost immediately decipher them and figure out what causes them and fix the problem. Congratulations, you are part of an elite group! Even a large number of people who claim that they can program are almost certainly less capable than you are. Given your good fortune, would you mind donating 5 to 10 minutes of your time to help countless beginners that are struggling in trying to understand Python error messages?

  • Is it too late to integrate GitOps?

    The idiom “missed the boat” can be used to describe the loss of an opportunity or a chance to do something. With OpenShift, the excitement to use this new and cool product immediately may create your own “missed the boat” moment in regards to managing and maintaining deployments, routes, and other OpenShift objects but what if the opportunity isn’t completely gone? Continuing with our series on GitOps (LINK), the following article will walk through the process of migrating an application and its resources that were created manually to a process in which a GitOps tool manages the assets. To help us understand the process we will manually deploy a httpd application. Using the steps below we will create a namespace, deployment, and service and expose the service which will create a route.