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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 11 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Story Graphics: AMD, Vulkan and NVIDIA Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2019 - 5:12pm
Story Rav1e Rust AV1 Encoder Adds SSSE3 Support, AArch64 NEON - But It's Still Slow Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2019 - 4:56pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2019 - 4:28pm
Story Games: Backbone, Game Shaders and Steam Play Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2019 - 4:26pm
Story A Look At The Per-Clock Performance / Peak Frequencies With The Intel Core i7-1065G7 Ice Lake Rianne Schestowitz 26/10/2019 - 4:14pm
Story Ubuntu 19.10 Makes it Easier to Share Media to Your TV, Games Consoles, Etc Rianne Schestowitz 26/10/2019 - 4:12pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2019 - 4:11pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/10/2019 - 1:35pm
Story The Best DVD Players for Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2019 - 11:38am
Story Linux Foundation's Open Mainframe Project, John Mertic Rianne Schestowitz 26/10/2019 - 6:54pm

'Real ID' Act Could Help ID Thieves

Filed under
Security

Security experts have expressed dismay about new legislation that will usher in the nation's first national ID system-citing a lack of confidence in the government's ability to employ the technology in such a way as to prevent citizens from being preyed upon by identity thieves.

FCC's Broadcast Flag Overturned

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Federal court strikes down regs that would limit viewers' ability to record and copy over-the-air hi-def TV programs.

Experts work to aid compiler behind open source

Filed under
Software

Programmers are working to debug and speed performance of the newly released GCC 4.0, the compiler at the foundation of the open-source and free-software movements.

Y2038 bug may hit Unix, Linux machines

Filed under
Linux

After the Millennium bug for which several billions of dollars were committed for research and updations in computer systems the world over, there is yet another bug on the horizon. It is the Year 2038 bug that is slated to hit computer users in that year.

Google Web Accelerator sparks privacy fears

Filed under
Security
Web

A software tool launched by Google on Wednesday that speeds up the process of downloading Web sites has caused some users to worry about their privacy.

Protect passwords? Not if latte is free

Filed under
Security

Would you give up your computer passwords for a Starbucks latte? ``imasexyguy'' did. So did ``raiderfan.'' The football fanatic even gave it to a radio reporter -- to put on the air. And then he told the interviewer he still wasn't going to change it.

Alien Vs. Predator II Is A Go

Filed under
Movies
SciFi

The sequel to Alien vs. Predator is happening and will most likely center on a battle in our world, 20th Century Fox Film Co-Chairman Tom Rothman told SCI FI Wire at the Saturn Awards in Los Angeles.

Martian 'divining rod' deploys its first boom

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The first of three radar booms that will search for underground water on Mars has apparently deployed successfully aboard Europe's Mars Express spacecraft, despite fears that the boom would whip back and strike the craft. But the radar will not be functional until its twin deploys, an event currently scheduled for Sunday.

Sun celebrates the 10th birthday Java

Filed under
Software

It has been 10 years this month since Sun Microsystems unveiled its Java technology to the world and, in the process, changed the computer industry forever.

Results from the 2004 Desktop Linux Market survey

Filed under
Linux

DesktopLinux.com had questions, and 3,841 readers chimed in with their answers. We've gathered the data on distributions, window managers, email clients, web browsers, and more in the 2004 Desktop Linux Market survey -- and some of the results are surprising!

ATI R520 to Hit Retail Shelves in Q3

Filed under
Hardware

As we reported recently, ATI and NVIDIA may very well introduce their next generation of GPUs at Computex this year. Along with that, ATI may also unveil their Multi-VPU or "SLI" technology at the world's largest hardware tradeshow as well.

Tiger Caged by SMB, Active Directory Problems

Filed under
Mac

A number of sites running Apple's new "Tiger" operating system are experiencing problems with SMB file sharing and authentication with Microsoft's Active Directory.

Quake 4 confirmed for Q4

Filed under
Gaming

As part of Activision's earnings call today, CEO and president Ronald Doornink answered the customary questions from game industry analysts. And in so doing so, he revealed Activison's lineup for the 2005 holiday season, a roster that will make the company a formidable adversary to its rival publishers.

M$ proposals open a window

Filed under
Microsoft

THE Free Software Foundation, the keeper of the sacred flame of open-source software untainted by commercial restrictions, evoked a nice image of Microsoft the other day. It compared its nemesis to an unruly child who throws himself to the floor in a tantrum and has to be dragged to his feet by his parents.

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People Telecom gets piracy warning

Filed under
Web

Anti-piracy agencies are targeting a select number of Internet service providers with e-mails warning of illegal movie and software downloads by their users.

Calif. violent video game bill passes committee

Filed under
Gaming

California lawmakers reconsidered and approved a bill in committee on Thursday that would ban the sale of violent video games to minors.

Pope's old car sells on Internet for nearly quarter million dollars

Filed under
Web

Pope Benedict XVI's former car has sold for nearly a quarter of a million dollars after an Internet auction that saw bids rocket in the space of a few hours, organisers said.

OpenOffice a Strong Competitor

Filed under
Reviews

It's weird how things can come back to bite you. Microsoft Corp. killed off the competition for office software suites and became a de facto monopoly in the area, with what result? The competition is back and, this time, it's free!

Gartner Discovers Potential IT Biggies

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Gartner, Inc. has highlighted seven technology providers it calls "cool vendors" that are developing emerging technologies to address increasing challenges. "XenSource's technology threatens to loosen Microsoft's grip on the PC market, and open up the PC for non-MS software that runs in conjunction with Windows. It's like an operating system for operating systems."

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel: LWN Articles and Radeon Linux 5.6 Changes

  • Fixing SCHED_IDLE

    The scheduler implements many "scheduling classes", an extensible hierarchy of modules, and each class may further encapsulate "scheduling policies" that are handled by the scheduler core in a policy-independent way. The scheduling classes are described below in descending priority order; the Stop class has the highest priority, and Idle class has the lowest. The Stop scheduling class is a special class that is used internally by the kernel. It doesn't implement any scheduling policy and no user task ever gets scheduled with it. The Stop class is, instead, a mechanism to force a CPU to stop running everything else and perform a specific task. As this is the highest-priority class, it can preempt everything else and nothing ever preempts it. It is used by one CPU to stop another in order to run a specific function, so it is only available on SMP systems. The Stop class creates a single, per-CPU kernel thread (or kthread) named migration/N, where N is the CPU number. This class is used by the kernel for task migration, CPU hotplug, RCU, ftrace, clock events, and more. The Deadline scheduling class implements a single scheduling policy, SCHED_DEADLINE, and it handles the highest-priority user tasks in the system. It is used for tasks with hard deadlines, like video encoding and decoding. The task with the earliest deadline is served first under this policy. The policy of a task can be set to SCHED_DEADLINE using the sched_setattr() system call by passing three parameters: the run time, deadline, and period. To ensure deadline-scheduling guarantees, the kernel must prevent situations where the current set of SCHED_DEADLINE threads is not schedulable within the given constraints. The kernel thus performs an admittance test when setting or changing SCHED_DEADLINE policy and attributes. This admission test calculates whether the change can be successfully scheduled; if not, sched_setattr() fails with the error EBUSY. The POSIX realtime (or RT) scheduling class comes after the deadline class and is used for short, latency-sensitive tasks, like IRQ threads. This is a fixed-priority class that schedules higher-priority tasks before lower-priority tasks. It implements two scheduling policies: SCHED_FIFO and SCHED_RR. In SCHED_FIFO, a task runs until it relinquishes the CPU, either because it blocks for a resource or it has completed its execution. In SCHED_RR (round-robin), a task will run for the maximum time slice; if the task doesn't block before the end of its time slice, the scheduler will put it at the end of the round-robin queue of tasks with the same priority and select the next task to run. The priority of the tasks under the realtime policies range from 1 (low) to 99 (high).

  • Virtio without the "virt"

    One might ask why it makes sense to implement virtio devices in hardware. After all, they were originally designed for hypervisors and have been optimized for software rather than hardware implementation. Now that virtio support is widespread, the network effects allow hardware implementations to reuse the guest drivers and infrastructure. The virtio 1.1 specification defines ten device types, among them a network interface, SCSI host bus adapter, and console. Implementing a standards-compliant device interface lets hardware implementers focus on delivering the best device instead of designing a new device interface and writing guest drivers from scratch. Moreover, existing guests will work with the device out of the box, and applications utilizing user-space drivers, such as the DPDK packet processing toolkit, do not need to be relinked with new drivers — this is especially helpful when static linking is utilized. Implementing virtio in hardware also makes it easy to switch between hardware and software implementations. A software device can be substituted without changing guest drivers if the hardware device is acting up. Similarly, if the driver is acting up, it is possible to substitute a software device to make debugging the driver easier. It is possible to assign hardware devices to performance-critical guests while assigning software devices to the other guests; this decision can be changed in the future to balance resource needs. Finally, implementing virtio in hardware makes it possible to live-migrate virtual machines more easily. The destination host can have either software or hardware virtio devices.

  • 5.5 Merge window, part 1

    The 5.5 merge window got underway immediately after the release of the 5.4 kernel on November 24. The first week has been quite busy despite the US Thanksgiving holiday landing in the middle of it. Read on for a summary of what the first 6,300 changesets brought for the next major kernel release.

  • Radeon Linux 5.6 Changes Begin Queuing - Better Power Management, Adds DMCUB Controller

    While the Linux 5.5 merge window has just been over for less than one week, AMD has already submitted their first batch of feature updates to DRM-Next of new graphics driver material aiming for Linux 5.6 early next year.

Screencasts and Shows: Pisi Linux 2.1.2 Run Through, Linux Headlines, Going Linux, FLOSS Weekly and Selling Keynotes/Tweets at the Linux Foundation

GNOME at the Back End and GNOME Shell 3.35.2

  • Molly de Blanc: Keeping the (server) lights on

    Building and maintaining infrastructure for the GNOME project is one of the many activities of the GNOME Foundation, and it’s one of the most important. Building software like the GNOME desktop environment requires a lot of technical support, including managing servers and providing collaboration tools. Since GNOME is focused on being a self-sustaining community, we look as much as possible to managing our own services and software, and making sure it is free and open source. The GNOME Infrastructure Team currently supports a total of 34 virtual machines hosted on a total of eight bare metal nodes. These virtual machines allow us to run services like the Openshift Container Platform (OSCP), which provides self-service access to the community to run any of their workflows on an automated and containarized fashion. GNOME is build using self-hosted FOSS. We collaboratively build GNOME using a GitLab instance, which has a total of 15k accounts. We do shared storage using NextCloud. Community discussion is handled over Mailman, Discourse, and MoinMoin. We are currently using Indico and Connfa for our event planning and management.

  • GNOME Shell 3.35.2 Begins Launching Spawned Processes Within Systemd Scopes

    Out today is a new development release of GNOME Shell on the road to GNOME 3.36 in March. Among the changes in this new GNOME Shell snapshot include: - Spawned processes are now placed within systemd scopes in order to improve out-of-memory behavior for applications, an easy means of being able to kill other processes when the shell is restarted, and other use-cases. Systemd scopes allow managing of processes for organization and resource management purposes.

Security: Proprietary Software Holes and More

  • It's the end of the 20-teens, and your Windows PC can still be pwned by nothing more than a simple bad font

    With the year winding to a close and the holiday parties set to kick off, admins will want to check out the December Patch Tuesday load from Microsoft, Adobe, Intel, and SAP and get them installed before downing the first of many egg nogs. [...] Also of note is CVE-2019-1471, a critical hypervisor escape bug that would allow an attacker running on a guest VM to execute code on the host box. The bulk of this month's critical fixes were for a series of five remote code execution flaws in Git for Visual Studio. In each of the flaws, said to be caused by improper handling of command-line input, an attacker would launch the exploit by convincing the target to clone a malicious repo. The remaining critical patch is for CVE-2019-1468, a play on the tried-and-true font-parsing vulnerability. In the wild, an attacker would embed the poisoned font file in a webpage and attack any system that visits.

  • Exploring Legacy Unix Security Issues

    The operating system SGI IRIX 6.5.22 was declared end of life in 2003, so it has limited use as a production system. I decided I could relive the good old days by looking for new vulnerabilities on an old system in my spare time. It was also an excuse to write some C code, and refresh my memory. One of my favorite vulnerabilities is the Insecure Temporary File (CWE-377). This involves manipulating files created in /tmp in an insecure manner. A file is created in /tmp by a piece of software that doesn’t check if the file exists before creating it. Allowing a malicious local user to symlink that file to a critical system file and overwriting it with the contents of what is written to the file in /tmp. So I started looking under the /usr/sbin directory for binaries to target. I did a quick examination of binaries and scripts in using the find command to give myself a starting point.

  • Private Internet Access updates Linux desktop client to prevent against [CVE-2019-14899]

    The Breakpointing Bad team at the University of New Mexico recently reported a VPN vulnerability that affects Linux, MacOS, iOS, Android, and more. The vulnerability allows malicious actors to not only see your VPN IP address, but also identify sites you are visiting and inject data into connections. The team consists of William J. Tolley, Beau Kujath, and Jedidiah R. Crandall and the public was notified on December 4th, 2019. Designated [CVE-2019-14899], the vulnerability shook the VPN industry due to the breadth of affected systems. [CVE-2019-14899] affects many different types of VPN protocols including OpenVPN, WireGuard, and IKEv2/IPSec. Private Internet Access has released an update to its Linux client that mitigates [CVE-2019-14899] from being used to infer any information about our users’ VPN connections. To our knowledge, Private Internet Access is the first commercial VPN to release a new client that prevents this ongoing security vulnerability.

  • Chrome now warns you when your password has been stolen

    Google is rolling out Chrome version 79 today, and it includes a number of password protection improvements. The biggest addition is that Chrome will now warn you when your password has been stolen as part of a data breach. Google has been warning about reused passwords in a separate browser extension or in its password checkup tool, but the company is now baking this directly into Chrome to provide warnings as you log in to sites on the web.