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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 24 Oct 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 4:25pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 4:24pm
Story Leftovers: FSF/GNU Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 4:20pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 4:17pm
Story The Bitcoin Schism Shows the Genius of Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 4:16pm
Story Calls for city that ditched Microsoft for Linux to switch laptops to Windows Roy Schestowitz 1 19/08/2015 - 4:16pm
Story Teaching DevOps and open source to a new generation Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 4:11pm
Story Canonical's IP Policy Is Deliberately Vague, Says Matthew Garrett Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 3:55pm
Story GTK+ 3.18 to Receive Support for Touchpad Gesture Events for Wayland Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 3:53pm
Story Intel Israel engineers Android phone 3D camera coup Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 3:49pm

US full of Internet addicts: study

Filed under
Web

The United States could be rife with Internet addicts as clinically ill as alcoholics, a study suggested. Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford, California, said their telephone survey indicated more than one in eight US residents showed at least one sign of "problematic Internet use."

Three Reasons to Use GNOME

Filed under
Software

Recently KDE turned ten years old, a milestone by any measure. Over the past ten years this desktop environment has undergone tremendous improvements and introduced a number of advances into desktop Linux. KDE is popular, highly customizable, and, no matter what your tastes are, you will probably agree that it can look good. If all this was not enough, KDE has developed a celebrity status by appearing on a few popular television shows. Despite all this, GNOME is still the best desktop environment for Linux.

Linux-Understand the meaning of Firewall

Filed under
HowTos

A firewall is a secure and trusted machine that sits between a private network and a public network (the term firewall comes from a device used to protect people from fire. The firewall is a shield of material esistant to fire that is placed between a potential fire and the people it is protecting).

Study: open source needs official support; Lobbyist disagrees with "flawed" conclusions

Filed under
OSS

Late last month, a research team led by University of Maastricht computer scientists and economists presented the results of what they had been working on for the past two years: a "Study on the Economic Impact of Open Source Software on Innovation and the Competitiveness of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) Sectors in the EU."

Debian Fights Mozilla's Fire, Thunder With 'Ice'

Filed under
Moz/FF

Neither Mozilla Firefox nor Mozilla Thunderbird are likely to be in the next Debian GNU/Linux release. Ubuntu Linux users will also be affected by the move since Ubuntu is derived from Debian and uses Debian's Mozilla packages.

Linux powers small plane "glass cockpit"

Filed under
Linux

FSMLabs reports that its real-time Linux distribution was used by Blue Mountain Avionics to build an electronic flight information system (EFIS) or "glass cockpit" for experimental aircraft. The EFIS/One offers dozens of solid-state instruments, digital autopilot, an air data computer, and a built-in flight recorder.

How to install SLED 10 on the ThinkPad T60p

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

The Lenovo ThinkPad T60p is the first ThinkPad to officially support GNU/Linux. Unfortunately that support is not quite as broad as some would like -- you're more or less forced to install and use SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 (SLED 10). The good news is, SLED 10 is a highly usable, stable, and configurable operating system.

Free Standards Group launches LSB Developer Network

Filed under
OSS

The Free Standards Group (FSG) is scheduled to announce today its answer to the Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) -- the Linux Standard Base (LSB) Developer Network. The LSB Developer Network (LDN) will combine community content with original content in one convenient location to provide developers with information on writing portable Linux applications.

Review: Frugalware 0.5 (Siwenna)

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Frugalware is an independent GNU/Linux distribution similar to Slackware, aiming at simplicity, speed and multimedia support. It features a wide software repository, managed by Pacman from Archlinux, which resolves dependencies and makes system updates easy.

There is no Oracle Linux

Filed under
Linux

Repeat after me: "There is no Oracle Linux." I don't care how many times you hear stock analysts say that Oracle is about to launch its own Linux. It's just not going to happen.

How to Run Firefox 1.5 And Firefox 2.0 RC3 Side by Side

Filed under
HowTos

Mozilla has recently announced Release Candidate 3(RC3) of the next version of Firefox - Firefox 2.0. Those who can’t wait for the final version to be released before having a peek at the new features(not too many actually) that will be part of Firefox 2.0 can grab the RC3 version and install it on their systems.

Novell's ongoing Linux makeover

Filed under
SUSE

Novell Inc. is three years into its transformation from a NetWare-centric software vendor to first and foremost a member in good standing of the Linux community. Along the way there has been great debate about the fate of the company's legacy products, including NetWare, and a complete overhaul of upper management.

Akademy 2007 Will be Held in Glasgow

Filed under
KDE

The annual KDE World Summit, Akademy, has found a home for 2007 in the vibrant city of Glasgow. The week-long event for contributors to the leading Free Desktop project will be held from 30th June to 7th July 2007 in Scotland's largest city.

A Question of Choice

Filed under
OSS

Choice: it's one of the key ideas at the heart of free software. The right to choose how to use your software, the right to choose who you share it with. Who could be against choice?

Gentoo install tips for quick and easy install

Filed under
HowTos

Gentoo installation supports 3 types of installation methods called stages. The method I personally used and was content with was the Networkless installation method. This means that the installer will install packages precompiled from the Live CD.

Widgets: Opera Browser's Bag of Free Goodies

Filed under
Software

Opera widgets come in all shapes and sizes. Widgets are clocks, calculators, games, and some of the handiest tools you can imagine. If you have Opera, you can download them in seconds from the widgets.opera.com page. When the widget appears, try it, and then click to keep it or not.

Interview with Jon “Maddog” Hall about the upcoming LinuxWorld UK

Filed under
Interviews

I was lucky enough to interview Jon “Maddog” Hall, one of the speakers of the upcoming LinuxWorld Conference & Expo in London.

Kexi, Krita the stars of new KOffice 1.6

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Project yesterday released KOffice version 1.6, the long awaited version of the open source office suite.

Oracle Linux rumor puts pressure on Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Egbert said she thinks Oracle could introduce a dedicated hardware appliance running Ubuntu and its own software. The relationship between Oracle and Ubuntu seems to have come together rather quickly, and is perhaps the fallout from an attempt by Red Hat and Oracle to work more closely together.

Novell Gearing up a NAC Solution?

Filed under
SUSE

Novell today officially rolled out its Novell Access Manager 3 solution claiming that it is the first such solution to integrate all aspects of access Management.

Yet it isn't a full NAC (network access control) solution yet, or is it?

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More in Tux Machines

'This was bigger than GNOME and bigger than just this case.' GNOME Foundation exec director talks patent trolls and much, much more

Patent assertion entities: do not pick a fight with open source. It won't end well for you. This is the message from GNOME Foundation executive director Neil McGovern, who will speak on the subject at the Open Source Summit Europe next week. McGovern talked to The Register ahead of the event on patents, Microsoft, and more. The open-source outfit develops the default desktop environment on major Linux distributions including Ubuntu and Red Hat. In late August 2019, Rothschild Patent Imaging filed a lawsuit against the GNOME foundation claiming that GNOME Shotwell, a photo manager, infringed one of its patents. “We didn't receive a letter before the court documents were filed or any sort of warning, it was just filed and then within a week there was a settlement request for $75,000,” McGovern told us. Read more

Debian Janitor: Hosters used by Debian packages

The Debian Janitor is an automated system that commits fixes for (minor) issues in Debian packages that can be fixed by software. It gradually started proposing merges in early December. The first set of changes sent out ran lintian-brush on sid packages maintained in Git. This post is part of a series about the progress of the Janitor. The Janitor knows how to talk to different hosting platforms. For each hosting platform, it needs to support the platform- specific API for creating and managing merge proposals. For each hoster it also needs to have credentials. At the moment, it supports the GitHub API, Launchpad API and GitLab API. Both GitHub and Launchpad have only a single instance; the GitLab instances it supports are gitlab.com and salsa.debian.org. This provides coverage for the vast majority of Debian packages that can be accessed using Git. More than 75% of all packages are available on salsa - although in some cases, the Vcs-Git header has not yet been updated. Of the other 25%, the majority either does not declare where it is hosted using a Vcs-* header (10.5%), or have not yet migrated from alioth to another hosting platform (9.7%). A further 2.3% are hosted somewhere on GitHub (2%), Launchpad (0.18%) or GitLab.com (0.15%), in many cases in the same repository as the upstream code. Read more Also: Multiple git configurations depending on the repository path

Benchmarks and Graphics Leftovers: x86, Zink, and Navi

  • Intel Core i7 1165G7 Tiger Lake vs. AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U Linux Performance

    For the Intel Tiger Lake Linux benchmarking thus far with the Core i7 1165G7 on the Dell XPS 13 9310 it's primarily been compared against the Ryzen 5 4500U and Ryzen 7 4700U on the AMD side since those are the only Renoir units within my possession. But a Phoronix reader recently provided me with remote access to his Lenovo ThinkPad X13 with Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U (8 cores / 16 threads) for seeing how the Tiger Lake performance compares against that higher-end SKU. Phoronix reader Tomas kindly provided SSH access to his ThinkPad X13 with Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U and 16GB of RAM. The Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U is quite close to the Ryzen 7 4800U with 8 cores / 16 threads but graphics capabilities in line with the 4700U. He's been quite happy with the ThinkPad X13 as a replacement to the Dell XPS 13 for business usage and has been running it with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on the Linux 5.8 kernel.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Catching Up

    A rare Saturday post because I spent so much time this week intending to blog and then somehow not getting around to it. Let’s get to the status updates, and then I’m going to dive into the more interesting of the things I worked on over the past few days. Zink has just hit another big milestone that I’ve just invented: as of now, my branch is passing 97% of piglit tests up through GL 4.6 and ES 3.2, and it’s a huge improvement from earlier in the week when I was only at around 92%. That’s just over 1000 failure cases remaining out of ~41,000 tests. For perspective, a table.

  • AMD 'Big Navi' 3DMark Firestrike results shared by HW testing firm

    The Linux specialists over at Phoronix have noticed that the AMD Linux driver has been tweaked to add support for a new graphics card dubbed the "navi10 blockchain SKU". It comments that the only visible difference in support for this card vs existing Navi 1X support, from the driver perspective, is that the patches disable the Display Core Next (DCN) and Video Core Next (VCN) support - basically creating a 'headless' Navi 1X graphics card. Cryprocurrency is showing signs of a resurgence in popularity and values, and some are worried that the latest and greatest GPUs from both Nvidia and AMD will be plucked from retailers even faster if they are viable mining platforms. It has been reported that AMD is trying to make sure retailers follow certain distribution practices with its upcoming Radeon RX 6000 series products, to make sure they are distributed to gamers and enthusiasts rather than scalpers and such like. An initiative like creating appealing crypto-specific Navi 1X products might help everyday consumers get their hands on a new Navi 2X graphics card too.

Does the Snap Store Use Too Much Memory?

This week I noticed that the Snap Store app on my Ubuntu 20.10 laptop uses a tonne of memory, even when it’s not running — we’re talking more memory than the main GNOME Shell process uses, and that is always running! Naturally I assumed something in my config was to blame. I do make heavy use of Snap apps — don’t worry I use plenty of Flatpak and PPAs too. I’m pretty polyamorous when it comes to packaging formats and I did install using an Ubuntu 20.10 daily build. Therein lay bugs. I know the caveats. All good. Don’t mind. Whatever. Read more