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Friday, 29 May 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 11:09pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 11:08pm
Story INTERVIEW: LENNART POETTERING Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 11:04pm
Story Top 4 Raspberry Pi OS Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 10:56pm
Story Parted Magic Now Has a Tool to Check the RAM Memory Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 10:39pm
Story Sweden to boost open source through procurement Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 10:34pm
Story VIDEO: Interview with ESET about Windigo & Advanced Linux Server-Side Threats Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 10:31pm
Story Linus Torvalds responds to Ars about diversity, niceness in open source Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 10:30pm
Story Fedora 21 review: Linux’s sprawliest distro finds a new focus Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 10:25pm
Story Why some Apple customers run Linux on Macbooks instead of OS X Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 10:24pm

Games watchdog warns over content

Filed under
Gaming

Games publishers in the US have been told by the industry's watchdog that they must declare any hidden content in games released since September 2004.

First code release for Debian consortium

Filed under
Linux

A consortium of Linux vendors created to promote the commercial use of the Debian GNU/Linux distribution has released its first product, and plans more.

Getting serious about the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Novell's Jack Messman thinks Microsoft Vista is going to be so expensive that it's going to make users think hard about switching to Linux instead.

You know something? He's right.

MDV 2006 RC2 - In the Homestretch?

Filed under
MDV
Reviews
-s

As we continue our coverage of the Mandriva 2006 development cycle, this time we test the upgrade procedure. In addition we also test the newer "isos on the disk" install method. Introduced last release (10.2/2005) this newest install feature is quite exciting. It didn't function in one of the first betas, but does it work this time? And how did the upgrade go? Did all my data get lost? Am I plagued with crashes and lost configurations? And was anything new to behold?

OSCSL gives Ubuntu to combat piracy

Filed under
Linux

More people are now considering open source technology as an option to proprietary software, according to a consultant of the Open Source Computer Security Laboratory (OSCSL).

How To Configure E 16.7.x

Filed under
Software

This file documents Enlightenment 16.7.x configuration file information. How To edit the config files used by Enlightenment, such as Menu files, configuration and layout of menus, how to configure applications Group...

First Look: VIA's C7 Platform

Filed under
Hardware

VIA is beginning to ramp up production on the successors to their C3 part, the C7 and C7-M CPU's. Keith Kowal, marketing manager for VIA's chipset platform group, took some time on his promotional tour to talk with us about the new platform.

Samba's Terpstra shoots down open source misinformation

Filed under
OSS

In this interview, Terpstra shoots down some pernicious misunderstandings about Linux and open source and explains how IT organizations often end up shunning their IT planning duties.

Also: Poor planning slow Windows-to-Linux desktop migrations.

HP slams brakes on Formula 1 sponsorship

Filed under
Hardware

In the midst of further financial difficulties, HP announced today that it is ending its sponsorship of the BMW Williams F1 team at the end of the 2005 racing season.

Should Open Source Applications Run On Windows?

Filed under
OSS

I was interested in posing questions on this topic to various people that work with, contribute to, or provide customer support and consulting for Open Source applications that run on Windows and Linux.

Open Source Software Moving Onto Corporate Desktops

Filed under
OSS

Open-source software, once primarily associated with computer operating systems, is now being used by companies for critical functions and software applications such as storing data, managing customers and analyzing business information.

Revaluing Deployment Of Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

Under the masterplan, the government hoped to make all its chief information officers and IT personnel OSS-literate at the awareness level by the end of this year.

Intel chips cost $40 to make

Filed under
Hardware

It's not hard to see how Intel makes its money. According to market watcher In-Stat, the chip giant's average cost per die is a mere $40 - significantly less than it the prices it attaches to its processors.

Microsoft's midlife crisis

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft, at 30, is in advanced middle age. The company relies on Windows and a suite of desktop applications--products released a decade ago--for 80% of sales and 140% of profits.

New lawsuit looming over Google's use of 'Gmail'?

Filed under
Legal

A British company is considering filing a lawsuit against Google over its use of the Gmail name.

Also: Google unveils blog search site

Programmer Implements Linux As ActiveX Applet

Filed under
Humor

In what could be the greatest programming achievement since the invention of curly braces, James Hacker has successfully shoehorned a bare-bones Linux distribution into an ActiveX applet running under Internet Explorer and Windows XP.

KDE Quickies: KDE 3.5 Review, Kontact Introduction

Filed under
KDE

This KDE 3.5 Alpha review shows us some new features coming soon. *** Alternative KDE file manager Krusader found themselves new web hosting. *** Linux.com introduces us to Kontact.

M$ seeks settlement in Google lawsuit

Filed under
Legal

Microsoft proposed on Tuesday settling its lawsuit with Google over the hiring of a former executive in China by asking Google to agree to limit the exec's duties until July 2006 when the noncompete agreement he signed with Microsoft expires.

Judge rules former M$ exec can recruit for Google

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Ruling in a case that exposed the behind-the-scenes animosity between two high-tech titans, a state judge cleared the way Tuesday for a former Microsoft Corp. executive to perform some of the tasks rival Google Inc. had hired him to do.

An Interview with Alan Cox

Filed under
OSS

According to Alan Cox, we're just at the beginning of a long journey into getting security right. Eager for directions and a glimpse of the future, O'Reilly Network interviewed him about his upcoming keynote

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Python Programming

  • Add interactivity to your Python plots with Bokeh

    In this series of articles, I'm looking at the characteristics of different Python plotting libraries by making the same multi-bar plot in each one. This time I'm focusing on Bokeh (pronounced "BOE-kay"). Plotting in Bokeh is a little more complicated than in some of the other plotting libraries, but there's a payoff for the extra effort. Bokeh is designed both to allow you to create your own interactive plots on the web and to give you detailed control over how the interactivity works. I'll show this by adding a tooltip to the multi-bar plot I've been using in this series. It plots data from UK election results between 1966 and 2020.

  • Bruteforcing Emails Using a Simple Python Script

    Brute forcing is an essential part of hacking – it is the last resort, it offers hope and sometimes, it just works! Have you ever wanted to code a small script that would bruteforce email servers for you? It is imperative to remember that our brute forcing efforts are only as great as our password list, and as such, the list must be chosen with care. That said, first and foremost, we need to import the two modules we will need from Python.

  • Best Python Game Engines

    To write computer games (us oldies call them video games!), you may be wondering, “Where do I start?” To make a playable game in a decent timeframe while also learning how the program works, you will need a game framework. The framework creates many of the constructs that you will need for your games to function. You do not want to invent these yourself. These include how to draw anything to screen, how to detect a collision, and how to keep the score. Even making things move on the screen is complex without some underlying library. In this article, you will learn about which packages do what and how easy it is to get started on your game.

  • Week 1 Check-in

    During the community bonding period, i am working on the first step of my proposal. I have used shlex to split the shell script into tokens, and then find the seperator(&&|;) to concatenate the commands. After the review from my mentor, we find that we can improve the code. We do not need to split into tokens at first. Instead, we can directly find the seperator(&&|;) to seperate the commands. This will save a lot of time, since we are not going through every word in the shell script.

  • Backing up and restoring Zato Single Sign-On data

    This article presents a procedure for backing up all of Zato Single Sign-On (SSO) data and restoring it later on. A single Zato server with SQLite is used for simplicity reasons but the same principles hold regardless of the size of one's environment or the SQL database used.

  • Attrs, Dataclasses and Pydantic

    Attrs also adds a nice string representation, comparison methods, optional validation and lots of other stuff to your classes, if you want to. You can also opt out of everything; attrs is very flexible. Attrs became so popular, that since Python 3.7 we also have the dataclasses module in the standard library. It is predominantly inspired by attrs (the attrs team was involved in the design of data classes) but has a smaller feature set and will evolve a lot slower. But you can use it out-of-the box without adding a new requirement to your package.

Latest BlackArch Linux ISO Adds More Than 150 New Hacking Tools, Linux 5.6

Coming five months after the previous release, the BlackArch Linux 2020.06.01 ISOs are here packed with more than 150 new tools for all your penetration testing and ethical hacking needs. According to the team, this latest BlackArch Linux ISO a high-quality release, which means that all the included packages have been quality tested and numerous bugs were fixed, including missing dependencies. This is also the first BlackArch Linux release to ship with a newer kernel, namely Linux 5.6. The Linux kernel 5.6.14 is included in the ISO images for better hardware support. Read more

today's howtos