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Friday, 29 May 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story You'll get sick of that iPad. And guess who'll be waiting? Big daddy Linux... Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 10:20pm
Story Linux Investments Looking Up for 2015 Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 10:06pm
Story DigitalOcean Launches FreeBSD Cloud Servers, Answering Developers Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 9:58pm
Story Chapeau 21 released! Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 9:26pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.12.36 LTS Officially Released Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 9:20pm
Story Black Lab Linux KDE 6.0 Arrives with a Refreshing Desktop Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 9:17pm
Story Ubuntu Devs Are Talking Whether to Let Software Update Delete Old Kernels Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 9:13pm
Story Learning systemd Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 9:11pm
Story 6 Linux Apps to Watch For in 2015 Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 9:09pm
Story `Caffeine` App Gets Its Indicator Back With New 2.8 Release Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 9:02pm

Panasonic to invest in embedded-Linux start-ups

Filed under
Linux

The venture capital arm of Panasonic's North American operations has launched an effort to cultivate embedded-Linux start-ups.

Education through Edubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

To quote the site, "Edubuntu is a version of the Ubuntu operating system suitable for classroom use. As an educator you'll be able to set up a computer lab, or establish an online learning environment, in an hour or less -- then administer that environment without having to become a fully-fledged Linux geek." New version Development Release: Edubuntu 5.10 Preview was announced on September 12, and this gave me the opportunity to look at Ubuntu - with a twist. As an educator I could evaluate edubuntu not as an operating system, but as a classroom tool. How effectively does edubuntu fit that role?

ITV: Avidly watching Linux

Filed under
Linux

ITV's director of operations Nick Leake has taken the brave move of moving a lot of his company's core systems onto Linux. We ask him how the migration is working out.

Sun exec: Galaxy to shape Sun's future

Filed under
Hardware

Announced yesterday, Sun's new servers are powered by Advanced Micro Devices' Opteron processors and have dual-core capabilities. Graham Lovell provided additional details about the servers and discussed how Sun plans to improve the bottom line going forward. He also talked about exactly how Linux and open source play into that strategy.

Computer Associates' patent donation is slammed

Filed under
OSS

Greg Aharonian, a vehement campaigner for higher quality patents, slammed Computer Associates' patent donation last week to the open source community as a 'fraud to impress the naive'.

Interview: Hans Reiser

Filed under
Reiser
Interviews
OSS

In this interview, Hans looks back at Reiser3, describing the advantages it had over other filesystems when it was released and its current state. He then explores the many improvements currently in Reiser4.

Open Source Journalist Named Principal Analyst By OSDL

Filed under
OSS

In addition to hands-on technology and product marketing expertise, Dave brings important relationships across the technology industry," said Stuart Cohen (pictured), CEO of OSDL, as OSDL today announced the appointment of Dave Rosenberg to a newly-created position as Principal Analyst.

Sony Recalls 3.5 Mln Playstation Power Adaptors

Filed under
Gaming

ruh-ro, Sony Corp. is recalling 3.5 million faulty power adaptors for its popular PlayStation 2 video game console because they may overheat and cause injury.

A Brief History of Technology

Filed under
Misc

The thing that distinguishes intelligent life is its ability to solve problems. When we think of technology nowadays, we tend to think of computers, science and other such advancements. However, it is very interesting to see how these advancements were brought about in the first place.

Slashdot Offering 30 Minute Advance Look

Filed under
Web

By logging in and agreeing to view an interstitial ad, DayPass users gain access to stories before other readers, 30 minutes ahead of them.

Bill Cosby Wins Fight Over Domain Name

Filed under
Web

A U.N. panel awarded to comedian Bill Cosby on Monday an Internet domain name based on the Fat Albert cartoon character he created in the 1960s.

Interview: Linspire's Kevin Carmony

Filed under
Linux

OfB's Timothy R. Butler talked with Linspire's new CEO, Kevin Carmony, a few weeks ago about some of Linspire's choices and the future of GNU/Linux.

Comparing Linux with Windows and Solaris

Filed under
Linux

Over the past few years, Linux adoption rates in the enterprise have soared. Users have quoted a wide range of TCO and ROI benefits, and Linux has become a strategic platform for business applications at many companies.

Intel's Viiv specifications leaked

Filed under
Hardware

Intel recently briefed system builders on the requirements for devices to qualify for the firm's Hometrino brand "Viiv".

Sun extends olive branch to Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Sun Microsystems initiated a warmer stage in its relationship with Red Hat on Monday, making conspicuous room onstage for the rival at a major server product launch.

FEMA relents on Microsoft Windows-only policy

Filed under
Web

FEMA updated their online FAQ on "Monday, 09-Sep-2005" which, of course is impossible, unless you're part of the government. Maybe that's why some of these government agencies botched the hurricane relief efforts? The simple lack of a common calendar?

Nexuiz 1.2.1 released

Filed under
Gaming

A new version of Nexuiz was released yesterday. Old clients won't work properly with 1.2.1 servers - so make sure to update your copy. You won't regret! There is a full download and patches for Nexuiz 1.1 and 1.2 - each download supports Windows, Linux and MacOS X.

Review: aLinux 12.5

Filed under
Reviews

aLinux, formerly known as Peanut Linux, is a strange GNU/Linux distribution. It bills itself as a "Professional Linux Operating System" for advanced users, hobbyists, and new Linux users. However, the distribution has a number of problems that make it unsuitable for new users and unpleasant even for experienced users.

Oh well, I liked it.

Samsung Targets Intel

Filed under
Hardware

Samsung Electronics Monday hinted that its next target is Intel Corp., the world’s biggest semiconductor maker headquartered in the United States.

GLA protests against "product placement" for M$ on German TV

Filed under
Linux

The German Linux Association is calling on Germany's ARD, the public Channel One, to remove the Microsoft logo from its reports on the elections. The lobby group stated that it was considering taking legal action.

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