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Saturday, 17 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 9:28am
Story LiVES Video Editor 3.0 is Here With Significant Improvements itsfoss 16/08/2019 - 9:26am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 8:29am
Story Microsoft’s latest Surface updates are causing CPU and Wi-Fi issues Rianne Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 8:17am
Story CutiePi Open Source Tablet uses Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 8:01am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 7:57am
Story Violin – minimalistic desktop music player (and Avidemux 2.7.4 released) Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 7:56am
Story IBM/Red Hat: RHELvolution, Command Line Heroes, Eclipse and OpenShift Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 7:28am
Story Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise 19.Q3 for Linux Released Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 7:15am
Story APT Patterns Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2019 - 7:11am

today's leftovers

Filed under
Development
Misc
  • Teaching People to Share Technology: Adafruit Founder Limor Fried

    When Adafruit founder Limor Fried was studying electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, she realized she was less interested in the electrical engineering part.

    “What I really liked to do was build stuff,” she said.

    Instead of working on her homework or thesis, Fried spent her time designing hardware projects in her dorm. She built an MP3 player way before Apple made iPods popular.

    “With electronics, you could build anything from an MP3 player to a GPS tracker,” she said.

    [...]

    “Open source hardware is a perfect middle ground. It’s inexpensive and allows you to customize the way you need it,” Fried said. “The code is there. Instructions are there. Anyone can do it. Since it’s open source, people can iterate, tweak, fine-tune to their needs. We are seeing a lot of interest in open source hardware for assistive technologies.”

    Adafruit’s hardware is working for everyone from creative hobbyists to people interested in building things for their smartphones to developers inventing products for the next industrial revolution. Adafruit also worked with computer game company Nvidia to help build its Jetson Nano Developer Kit, which lets users run multiple neural networks for artificial intelligence, machine learning and edge computing.

  • Gcc 4.2.1 to be removed before FreeBSD 13, a firm timeline
    Greetings,
    
    
    
    
    As promised for almost the past decade or so, gcc 4.2.1 will be removed
    from the tree before FreeBSD 13 is branched.
    
    
    
    
    I propose the following timeline for its removal:
    
    
    
    
    2019-08-31: disconnect gcc 4.2.1 from CI build
    
    
    
    
    Turn off -Werror on gcc 4.2.1 platforms
    
    
    
    
    Turn off all gcc 4.2.1 from universe by default (can be turned on)
    
    
    
    
    2019-12-31: Turn off gcc 4.2.1 build by default (can be turned on)
    
    
    
    
    2020-03-31: svn rm gcc 4.2.1 and friends
    
    
    
    
    2020-05-31: svn rm all non-clang platforms not supported by in-tree LLVM or
    converted to ext toolchain.
    
    
    
    
    2020-07-31: svn rm all ext toolchain platforms not supported by re@ release
    scripts
    
    
    
    
    The basic notion is that it’s long past time to have a firm plan for EOL
    gcc 4.2.1 in the tree. There is ample external toolchain support today for
    platforms that need it to build images, though that integration with
    buildworld could use some more polish. It’s now completely sufficient to
    move to the next phase of removing gcc 4.2.1 from the tree.
    
    
    
    
    We already have gcc 6.4 as an xtoolchain on amd64 in CI. This should
    somewhat mitigate the risk for cross-compiler portability. This is a
    long-established part of our CI. We want to retain gcc support for modern
    versions of gcc since its debuggability is higher. Notifications for this
    are currently turned off, but will be enabled soon. It’s expected that this
    always will be working later in the year. We’ll work to update the
    committers guide to reflect this, as well as give a recipe for testing.
    
    
    
    
    The first phase will be at the end of the month. We’ll turn off -Werror on
    gcc 4.2.1 (and MFC it to stable/11 and stable/12). We’ll then stop building
    all platforms that require it as part of CI. New warnings will come up, but
    will no longer waste developer time in trying to fix. Gcc 4.2.1 platforms
    will no longer be built as part of universe, unless you add
    -DMAKE_OBSOLETE_GCC is added to the command line. We plan on implementing
    this by 2019-08-31.
    
    
    
    
    An experimental branch will be created that will remove gcc related bits to
    expose gaps in planning and to come up with a list of action items needed
    to ensure Tier 1 platforms are unaffected by the gcc removal. The timeline
    for this is by the end of September.
    
    
    
    
    Next, we’ll turn off building gcc by default. This will effectively break
    all gcc platforms with in-tree compilers. The external toolchain support we
    have will suffice here, and patches will be accepted for whatever
    integration are needed for these platforms with our current ports /
    packages. The onus for these changes will be squarely on people that want
    the platforms to continue. However, as a stop-gap gcc building can be
    turned on for those people transitioning gcc-only platforms until gcc 4.2.1
    is removed. This will happen on or about 2019-12-31.
    
    
    
    
    After a 3 month transition period, gcc 4.2.1 will be removed from the tree.
    This will be done on or about 2020-03-31.
    
    
    
    
    After an additional 2 month transition period, all those platforms that
    have not integrated with the FreeBSD CI system, work in a make universe
    with the proper packages installed, and are shown to boot on real hardware
    will be removed from the tree. This will happen on or about 2020-05-31.
    
    
    
    
    After an additional 2 month grace period, those platforms that require
    external toolchain integration that aren’t supported by the release
    engineer’s release scripts will be removed. This  will happen on or about
    2020-07-31.
    
    
    
    
    The timeline gives powerpc, mips, mips64, and sparc64 9 months to integrate
    either into an in-tree compiler, or to have a proven external toolchain
    solution. This is on top of the many-years-long warnings about this being
    the end game of the clang integration.
    
    
    
    
    This is the proposed timeline, but should there be a significant issue
    that’s discovered, the timeline can be amended.
    
    
    
    
    Also note: the all toolchains in tree discussions are specifically out of
    bounds here. Let’s remove one compiler and get the infrastructure needed to
    make external toolchains robust before embarking on that discussion.
    
    
    
    
    Comments?
    
    
    
    
    Warner
    
  • FreeBSD 13 Is Preparing To Finally Retire GCC 4.2

    A firm timeline has been established for removing GCC 4.2.1 before next year's FreeBSD 13 release. This timeline includes dropping GCC 4.2.1 from continuous integration builds at the end of the month and turning off GCC 4.2.1 from universe by default. At the end of the calendar year they will turn off GCC 4.2.1 by default and at the end of March is when they will remove the compiler code entirely from their SVN. Next May they also intend to drop non-Clang platforms that are not supported by the in-tree LLVM or converted to an external toolchain. 

  • Designing Continuous Build Systems: Handling Webhooks with Sanic

    After covering how to design a build pipeline and define build directives in the continuous builds series, it’s time to look at handling events from a code repository.

    As internet standards evolved over the years, the HTTP protocol has become more prevalent. It’s easier to route, simpler to implement and even more reliable. This ubiquity makes it easier for applications that traverse or live on the public internet to communicate with each other. As a result of this, the idea of webhooks came to be as an “event-over-http” mechanism.

  • No, Zwift Racing Wasn’t Hacked. Yet. Sorta. Let Me Explain.

    One of the most well-known conferences from a lore standpoint is Def Con, but there are also many other huge ones such as BlackHat, SANS, and RSA, and other vendor-specific ones like BlueHat (run by Microsoft for Microsoft technologies) or government-specific ones. Again, in general the goal of these summits is to learn about security and improve security practices.

    This past Sunday at Def Con (considered one of the more rambunctious events on the circuit) a presentation was given around Zwift and ‘hacking’ it – titled “Cheating in eSports: How to Cheat at Virtual Cycling Using USB Hacks”. Now one has to understand that while in the ‘mainstream’ the term ‘hacking’ is usually akin to ‘breaking’, in the computer world, the term ‘hacking’ is often a bit more nebulous. Sometimes used interchangeably with ‘tweaking’ or ‘optimizing’, and sometimes used in the less ideal variant such as ‘credit cards were hacked’. So one has to take any usage of that term with a bit of sanity check to see what’s going on.

  • Protecting your organization against privileged identity theft

    What do the top data breaches of the 21st century have in common? Privileged identity abuse. In these breach instances, well-resourced, external actors were able to gain the credentials of users with access to privileged accounts – such as administrative, service or operational accounts – giving them the ability to collect and exfiltrate industrial-scale amounts of data.

Server Side: IBM, Apache and CNCF

Filed under
Server
  • Take Your Time With IBM Stock as it Digests its Behemoth Linux Maker Deal

    Prior to the Red Heat deal, IBM was treading water. The company released earnings on July 17. For the second quarter of 2019, revenue was down year-over-year. Sales were $19.1 billion, down from $20 billion in the prior year’s quarter. The company’s Cloud and Business Services unit saw slight growth (5% and 3% YoY, respectively), but declines in the Global Technology Services and Systems units countered this improvement. Despite this slight revenue slip, IBM managed to keep quarterly operating income steady at ~$2.8 billion.

    The Red Hat deal adds a variety of growth catalysts to the International Business Machines story. For one thing, the acquisition makes IBM a bigger player in the $1 trillion cloud computing space. The deal is expected to accelerate revenue growth and improve gross margins. The deal is also very synergistic. IBM can now sell Red Hat’s suite of solutions to their existing customer base. With IBM’s global reach, the company could expand Red Hat’s business better than Red Hat would have done as an independent company.

  • Apache Software Foundation's Code-Base Valued At $20 Billion USD

    The Apache Software Foundation has published their 2019 fiscal year report highlighting their more than 350 open-source projects/initiatives and this also marks their 20th anniversary. 

    The Apache Software Foundation's 2019 report values their code-base at more than $20 billion USD using the COCOMO 2 model for estimating. Though for their 2019 fiscal year the foundation turned a profit of $585k USD thanks to sponsors. There are more than 190 million lines of code within Apache repositories. 

  • 9 open source cloud native projects to consider

    I mean, just look at that! And this is just a start. Just as NodeJS’s creation sparked the explosion of endless JavaScript tools, the popularity of container technology started the exponential growth of cloud-native applications.

    The good news is that there are several organizations that oversee and connect these dots together. One is the Open Containers Initiative (OCI), which is a lightweight, open governance structure (or project), "formed under the auspices of the Linux Foundation for the express purpose of creating open industry standards around container formats and runtime." The other is the CNCF, "an open source software foundation dedicated to making cloud native computing universal and sustainable."

    In addition to building a community around cloud-native applications generally, CNCF also helps projects set up structured governance around their cloud-native applications. CNCF created the concept of maturity levels—Sandbox, Incubating, or Graduated—which correspond to the Innovators, Early Adopters, and Early Majority tiers on the diagram below.

Kernel: Greg K-H on Patch Workflow With Mutt, Building Linux Fast, and AMD Firmware Fix

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Patch Workflow With Mutt - 2019

    Given that the main development workflow for most kernel maintainers is with email, I spend a lot of time in my email client. For the past few decades I have used (mutt), but every once in a while I look around to see if there is anything else out there that might work better.

    One project that looks promising is (aerc) which was started by (Drew DeVault). It is a terminal-based email client written in Go, and relies on a lot of other go libraries to handle a lot of the “grungy” work in dealing with imap clients, email parsing, and other fun things when it comes to free-flow text parsing that emails require.

    aerc isn’t in a usable state for me just yet, but Drew asked if I could document exactly how I use an email client for my day-to-day workflow to see what needs to be done to aerc to have me consider switching.

    Note, this isn’t a criticism of mutt at all. I love the tool, and spend more time using that userspace program than any other. But as anyone who knows email clients, they all suck, it’s just that mutt sucks less than everything else (that’s literally their motto)

  • Building The Default x86_64 Linux Kernel In Just 16 Seconds

    It's now been one week since the launch of AMD's EPYC Rome processors with up to 64 cores / 128 threads per socket and better IPC uplift compared to their previous-generation parts. Rome has outperformed Intel Xeon Scalable CPUs in their class while offering better power efficiency and way better performance-per-dollar. One of my favorite metrics has been how quickly the new EPYC 7742 2P can build the Linux kernel. 

    It used to be that building out the Linux kernel could easily take the time needed to enjoy a beverage or have a meal while now with the EPYC 7742 2P it's easy to build the Linux kernel in just 15~16 seconds! Up until the Rome testing I was never able to crack 20 seconds with any of the hardware at my disposal while now it's easy hitting 15 seconds. That is with a Linux x86_64 default "defconfig" build. As shown in the launch article, that easily beats the likes of a dual Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 and a big improvement as well over the Naples EPYC 7601 2P configuration. 

  • New Firmware update Reportedly solves Ryzen 3000 boot issues Linux

    We don't talk about Linux a lot, as the install base is small and not really the PC Gamers domain, however as it turns out Linux users have had Boot issues with Ryzen 3000. A problem that is now confirmed to be solved with the latest BIOS updates.

    AMD provided a solution for the Linux issues at hand as firmware updates with AGESA Combo-AM4 1.0.0.3abb should solve the problems (and various others on the Windows platform). The Linux issues had been named Systemd error, at least that is listed at the change log of the ROG Crosshair VII Hero bios.

A look at MX Linux 18.3

Filed under
Reviews

I’ve been doing a little bit of distrohopping in the last week or so to take a look at new systems being developed and to try a few I haven’t had a look at in a while; MX Linux being one of the latter.

The last time I touched MX Linux was at least two or three years ago, and I remember that I wasn’t a fan at the time. However, I’m really happy to say that my opinion of the OS has changed with my latest dive into it.

Read more

Proprietary Software: Snip, Microsoft Ripoff and Critical New Holes in Windows

Filed under
Microsoft
  • New Snip Smartphone App Converts Math Screenshots Into LaTeX

    Not so long ago, mathematics students and researchers had to spend a tedious amount of time writing out equations in the technical and scientific documentation typesetting system LaTeX. The launch this April of the AI-powered desktop tool Snip changed that. Available for Mac, Windows and the Ubuntu system, Snip converts screenshots of mathematical formulas into LaTeX code in seconds. Snip went viral as an easy-to-use time-saver for the math and science community.

  • What Microsoft's upcoming 'outsourcing' licensing changes could mean for your business

    Microsoft's cloud competitors have been making a lot of noise about changes in Microsoft's licensing coming on October 1. And Microsoft, which has been positioning itself as an ally of customer choice, found itself on the wrong side of accusations of untrustworthiness and price-gouging.

  • Microsoft Warning Impacts 800M Windows 10 Computers

    Microsoft has warned users of 'critical' new vulnerabilities across all versions of Windows which have the potential to spread worldwide...

  • We checked and yup, it's no longer 2001. And yet you can pwn a Windows box via Notepad.exe

    Software buried in Windows since the days of WinXP can be abused to take complete control of a PC with the help of good ol' Notepad and some crafty code.

    On Tuesday, ace bug-hunter Tavis Ormandy, of Google Project Zero, detailed how a component of the operating system's Text Services Framework, which manages keyboard layouts and text input, could be exploited by malware or rogue logged-in users to gain System-level privileges. Such level of access would grant software nasties and miscreants total control over, and surveillance of, the computer.

    The flaw, designated CVE-2019-1162, is patched in this month's Patch Tuesday release of security fixes from Microsoft. The relevant update should be installed as soon as possible.

Audio: Clementine Music Player, Python Bytes and LINUX Unplugged

Filed under
Software
  • Clementine Music Player for All Your Audio Needs

    VLC is a mainstay for most fans of FOSS technology and most Linux distros. It’s a great little player, don’t get me wrong, but if you have a large library of audio files, some times you need something more powerful.

    The Clementine Music Player is a full-service audio player with all the tools you need to keep track of your audio library. According to the project’s website, Clementine “inspired by Amarok 1.4, focusing on a fast and easy-to-use interface for searching and playing your music.”

  • Episode #143: Spike the robot, powered by Python!
  • Bigger. Faster. Harder to Maintain. | LINUX Unplugged 314

    It's huge, and it's getting bigger every month. How do you test the Linux Kernel? Major Hayden from Red Hat joins us to discuss their efforts to automate Kernel bug hunting.

    Plus our honest conversation about which Linux works best for us.

10 Best Free Linux Document Management Systems (Updated 2019)

Filed under
Software

Document Management is an information technology that has taken over from legacy systems of manual or server based file sharing, the electronic filing cabinet, to control policies and procedures. It is one of the functions provided by Enterprise Content Management.

A document management system enables individuals and businesses to manage documents, making it easy to locate a previous document version. This is important from a record control perspective, and to ensure that compliance standards are met within a user-friendly environment.

The main benefit offered by a document management system is that it gives individuals and businesses the tools to store and index many different types of documents and electronic files. Information and knowledge within the organisation can be accessed as appropriate, leading to an increase in productivity. Any kind of binary data can be stored in the document system. Other uses of this type of system include document workflow, records management, image management, disaster recovery, backup, and access control.

Read more

Blankets give them enough warm but not Education!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Operating System?

Hanthana Linux, a Fedora remix bundle with bunch of Educational tools and Sugar Desktop.

Software?

LibreOffice, Firefox, VLC, Educational Tools, Gnome/Sugar Desktop.

Read more

Qt/KDE: KDE Plasma 5.17, Qt Quick 3D and Krita

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.17 Pre-Beta Run Through

    In this video, we look at KDE Plasma 5.17 Pre-Beta, as of 13 August 2019

  • Introducing Qt Quick 3D: A high-level 3D API for Qt Quick

    As Lars mentioned in his Technical Vision for Qt 6 blog post, we have been researching how we could have a deeper integration between 3D and Qt Quick. As a result we have created a new project, called Qt Quick 3D, which provides a high-level API for creating 3D content for user interfaces from Qt Quick. Rather than using an external engine which can lead to animation synchronization issues and several layers of abstraction, we are providing extensions to the Qt Quick Scenegraph for 3D content, and a renderer for those extended scene graph nodes.

    Does that mean we wrote yet another 3D Solution for Qt? Not exactly, because the core spatial renderer is derived from the Qt 3D Studio renderer. This renderer was ported to use Qt for its platform abstraction and refactored to meet Qt project coding style.

  • The Qt Company Announces Its New High-Level 3D API - Qt Quick 3D

    Continuing on from the recent technical vision for the Qt6 tool-kit, The Qt Company has now announced their new high-level 3D API they are developing for this next major release of Qt.

    Qt Quick 3D is this new high-level API for creating 3D content for user-interfaces out of Qt Quick without the need for any external engine. Qt Quick 3D will make use of the renderer currently employed by the Qt 3D STUDIO.

  • Implementing a derivated class of kis_brushes_pipe

    I am still working on the change of the brush index, so far I've been confused with the classes, because I am not sure why somethings are implemented and then overriden or why somethings are where they are, and I am not sure exactly when or why to do this.

    I've been working all week, instead of trying to deliver a feature I tried to write and organize the whole class, and then slowly write all the small functions, this is because I've had problem with classes and objects, but I understand functions, so I to tried work with my strengths.

Taz Brown: How Do You Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat

We recently interviewed Taz Brown on how she uses Fedora. This is part of a series on the Fedora Magazine. The series profiles Fedora users and how they use Fedora to get things done. Contact us on the feedback form to express your interest in becoming a interviewee.

Taz Brown is a seasoned IT professional with over 15 years of experience. “I have worked as a systems administrator, senior Linux administrator, DevOps engineer and I now work as a senior Ansible automation consultant at Red Hat with the Automation Practice Team.” Originally Taz started using Ubuntu, but she started using CentOS, Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora as a Linux administrator in the IT industry.

Taz is relatively new to contributing to open source, but she found that code was not the only way to contribute. “I prefer to contribute through documentation as I am not a software developer or engineer. I found that there was more than one way to contribute to open source than just through code.”

Read more

Games: The Coma 2: Vicious Sisters, Flycast, Unpacking, Kingdoms of the Dump

Filed under
Gaming

Security: PGP & GPG, Flaws, and Nmap 7.80

Filed under
Security
  • The Impending Demise of “PGP & GPG”

    My No Starch books normally sell out their print run, get reprinted a few times, and fade into Out Of Print status. But PG3 never sold out its initial print run.

  • Down the Rabbit-Hole...

    It took a lot of effort and research to reach the point that I could understand enough of CTF to realize it’s broken. These are the kind of hidden attack surfaces where bugs last for years. It turns out it was possible to reach across sessions and violate NT security boundaries for nearly twenty years, and nobody noticed.

    Now that there is tooling available, it will be harder for these bugs to hide going forward.

  • Flaws in 4G Routers of various vendors put millions of users at risk

    “Those manufacturers who are going to be selling 5G routers are currently selling 3G and 4G routers. Which – and I really cannot stress this enough – are mainly bad.”

  • Hack in the box: Hacking into companies with “warshipping”

    Penetration testers have long gone to great lengths to demonstrate the potential chinks in their clients' networks before less friendly attackers exploit them. But in recent tests by IBM's X-Force Red, the penetration testers never had to leave home to get in the door at targeted sites, and the targets weren't aware they were exposed until they got the bad news in report form. That's because the people at X-Force Red put a new spin on sneaking in—something they've dubbed "warshipping."

    Using less than $100 worth of gear—including a Raspberry Pi Zero W, a small battery, and a cellular modem—the X-Force Red team assembled a mobile attack platform that fit neatly within a cardboard spacer dropped into a shipping box or embedded in objects such as a stuffed animal or plaque. At the Black Hat security conference here last week, Ars got a close look at the hardware that has weaponized cardboard.

  • These Legit-Looking iPhone Lightning Cables Will Hijack Your Computer

    It looks like an Apple lightning cable. It works like an Apple lightning cable. But it will give an attacker a way to remotely tap into your computer.

  • Nmap Defcon Release! 80+ improvements include new NSE scripts/libs, new Npcap, etc.

    Nmap 7.80 source code and binary packages for Linux, Windows, and Mac are available for free download from the usual spot: [...]

XFCE 4.14 Released. Here’s What’s New

Filed under
Linux

XFCE 4.14 is released after more than 4 years of development. Here’s what’s in store.

XFCE – the lightweight open-source desktop environment released its latest stable version 4.14 with major improvements and bug fixes. This stable release comes after earlier stable 4.12 version.
Read more

Programming: Buildah, Python, KDE/Krita and Debian/Linux

Filed under
Development
  • buildah error: vfs driver does not support overlay.mountopt options

    Buildah and podman make a great pair for building, managing and running containers on a Linux system. You can even use them with GitLab CI with a few small adjustments, namely the switch from the overlayfs to vfs storage driver.

    I have some regularly scheduled GitLab CI jobs that attempt to build fresh containers each morning and I use these to get the latest packages and find out early when something is broken in the build process.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #381 (Aug. 13, 2019)
  • Krita Sprint 2019

    So, we had a Krita sprint last week, a gathering of contributors of Krita. I’ve been at all sprints since 2015, which was roughly the year I became a Krita contributor. This is in part because I don’t have to go abroad, but also because I tend to do a lot of administrative side things.

    This sprint was interesting in that it was an attempt to have more if not as much artists as developers there. The idea being that the previous sprint was very much focused on bugfixing and getting new contributors familiar with the code base(we fixed 40 bugs back then), this sprint would be more about investigating workflow issues, figuring out future goals, and general non-technical things like how to help people, how to engage people, how to make people feel part of the community.

  • Steve Kemp: That time I didn't find a kernel bug, or did I?

    Recently I saw a post to the linux kernel mailing-list containing a simple fix for a use-after-free bug. 

Linux 5.3, Linux 5.2 and Linux 5.1

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.3 Will Address Crackling Audio on AMD PCs

    Linux users received some good news today: Phoronix reported that Linux 5.3 will finally address issues with audio input on systems with AMD processors. Those fixes will be added to currently available versions of the Linux kernel, too, so users won't have to install the point upgrade.
    Phoronix said that Linux users who rely on AMD processors have been reporting "crackling" audio input since at least 2017. The problems don't usually appear to affect the audio output, so many people were probably unaware of the issue, but there were sporadic reports of "occasional playback hiccups."
    These issues were said to affect systems featuring motherboards built around AMD's X470 and X370 chipsets that used Realtek audio codecs. Linux users couldn't find a workaround to address the issue--which isn't common for that particular community--so they simply had to accept the crackle.

  • Reiser4 File-System Port Updated For The Linux 5.1 + Linux 5.2 Kernels

    Up until today the newest Linux kernel version supported by the official Reiser4 out-of-tree file-system driver patch was Linux 5.0, but that has now changed with the belated Linux 5.1 kernel support arriving as well as a separate patch for Linux 5.2 kernel support.

    Bringing Reiser4 to the Linux 5.1 kernel required various changes to the block layer's interface while porting to Linux 5.2 required some additional block layer interface changes. The Linux 5.2 version also has one additional bug fix as well.

Games: JS13KGames, Dicey Dungeons, Encodya, Humble Jackbox Party Bundle 2019

Filed under
Gaming
  • Mozilla VR Blog: WebXR category in JS13KGames!
  • Roll dice, swap around cards and kick butt in Dicey Dungeons, out now

    Dicey Dungeons is a lighthearted deck-building roguelike, where you're a massive walking die and it's available today with Linux support.

    Made by Terry Cavanagh (VVVVVV, Super Hexagon), Chipzel, Marlowe Dobbe and Justo Delgado Baudí, this new team have managed to created something extremely unique with Dicey Dungeons.

  • Impressive looking science fiction point and click game ENCODYA is now on Kickstarter

    Encodya, the upcoming science fiction point and click with a free demo on itch.io, is now on Kickstarter. While the demo showed a rather ordinary day of orphan Tina and her Robot SAM-53, she'll be going on real adventures in the full game.

    The beautiful game the author attributes to "the sweetness and creativity of Studio Ghibli, the setting and atmosphere of Blade Runner and the humor and game style of Monkey Island", is looking for at least 27,500€ (~$30,800) in funding. The first stretch goal is 32,500€ for three additional languages, namely Italian (the developer is Italian by origin), German (we are the home of adventure games, right?) and Spanish. The second stretch goal promises an additional hour of gameplay with extra puzzles, locations and characters if 45,000€ is reached. Additional stretch goals would be unlocked later.

  • Be ready for a party with the new Humble Jackbox Party Bundle 2019

    Having people over and fancy a laugh? The Humble Jackbox Party Bundle 2019 just recently went live and has some good picks for you.

Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 12-STABLE v1200059.3

Filed under
Security
BSD

HardenedBSD-12-STABLE-v1200059.3

Read more

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Version 8.6 basiert auf → Debian/stable (buster), mit einzelnen Paketen aus Debian/testing und unstable (sid) (v.a. Grafiktreiber und aktuelle Productivity-Software) und verwendet → Linux Kernel 5.2.5 sowie Xorg 7.7 (core 1.20.4) zur Unterstützung aktueller Computer-Hardware. Read more English: Knoppix 8.6 new public version is finally out !

Linux 5.3 Kernel Yielding The Best Performance Yet For AMD EPYC "Rome" CPU Performance

Among many different Linux/open-source benchmarks being worked on for the AMD EPYC "Rome" processors now that our initial launch benchmarks are out of the way are Linux distribution comparisons, checking out the BSD compatibility, and more. Some tests I wrapped up this weekend were seeing how recent Linux kernel releases perform on the AMD EPYC 7742 64-core / 128-thread processors. For some weekend analysis, here are benchmarks of Linux 4.18 through Linux 5.3 in its current development form. All tests were done on the same AMD EPYC 7742 2P server running Ubuntu 19.04 and using the latest kernels in each series via the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA. Read more

Fedora 29 to 30 upgrade - How it went

Alas, my Fedora 30 experience started strong with the first review and soured since. The test on the old laptop with Nvidia graphics highlighted numerous problems, including almost ending up in an unbootable state due to the wrong driver version being selected by the software center. With the in-vivo upgrade, I almost ended up in a similar state due to some incompatibility with extensions. I wasn't pleased by other glitches and errors, and the performance improvement margin isn't as stellar as the clean install test. All in all, Fedora 30 feels like a rather buggy release, with tons of problems. I think versions 27 to 29 were quite robust overall, at least the Gnome version, but the latest edition is quite rough. That would mean I'd advise people upgrading to take care of their data, remember the possible snags like extensions, and triple check their hardware is up to the task, because apparently QA isn't cool anymore, and no one else will do this for you. All in all, Fedora 30 is very bleeding edge, finicky, definitely not for everyday use by ordinary desktop folks. It's a dev tool for devs, so if you want something stable and boring, search elsewhere. Read more

Neptune 6.0 Released, Which is based on Debian 10 (Buster)

Leszek has pleased to announce the release of the new stable release of Neptune 6.0 on 1th Aug, 2019. It’s first stable release of Neptune 6.0 based on Debian 10 “Buster”, featuring the KDE Plasma desktop with the typical Neptune tweaks and configurations. The base of the system is Linux Kernel in version 4.19.37 which provides the necessary hardware support. Plasma 5.14.5 features the stable and flexible KDE made desktop that is loved by millions. Read more