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Tuesday, 25 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 23/06/2019 - 6:28pm
Story Openwashing and FUD: A Roundup Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2019 - 4:40pm
Story Programming/Development Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2019 - 2:01pm
Story CERN Is Working To Move Further Away From Microsoft Due To License Costs Going Up By 10x Roy Schestowitz 12 23/06/2019 - 11:31am
Story Open Source Slack Alternative Mattermost Gets $50M Funding Roy Schestowitz 2 23/06/2019 - 10:20am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2019 - 9:48am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2019 - 9:41am
Story KStars v3.3.1 is released Rianne Schestowitz 23/06/2019 - 7:34am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2019 - 2:25am
Story Kernel: Rants, PulseAudio 12, Valve-Related Bug and Mesa 19.1.1 RC Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2019 - 2:23am

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Podcast, Wine Concerns, Parallel Installs and Vanilla Framework 2.0

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E11 – 1942

    This week we’ve been to FOSS Talk Live and created games in Bash. We have a little LXD love in and discuss 32-bit Intel being dropped from Ubuntu 19.10. OggCamp tickets are on sale and we round up some tech news.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 11 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Wine Developers Appear Quite Apprehensive About Ubuntu's Plans To Drop 32-Bit Support

    It's looking like the plans announced by Canonical this week to drop their 32-bit packages/libraries beginning with Ubuntu 19.10 will be causing problems for the Wine camp at least in the near-term until an adequate solution is sorted out for providing their 32-bit Wine builds to Ubuntu users.

    Wine and Steam are among the few prominent Linux software packages still prominently living mostly in a 32-bit world. Valve certainly has the resources to come up with a timely solution especially with Ubuntu being the most popular Linux distribution used by Steam and they can move on with shipping their own 32-bit Steam Runtime libraries and other changes as needed. For the upstream Wine project it might be a bit more burdensome providing 32-bit Wine packages for Ubuntu.

  • Parallel installs – test and run multiple instances of snaps

    In Linux, testing software is both easy and difficult at the same time. While the repository channels offer great availability to software, you can typically only install a single instance of an application. If you want to test multiple instances, you will most likely need to configure the remainder yourself. With snaps, this is a fairly simple task.

    From version 2.36 onwards, snapd supports parallel install – a capability that lets you have multiple instances of the same snap available on your system, each isolated from the others, with its own configurations, interfaces, services, and more. Let’s see how this is done.

  • Vanilla Framework 2.0 upgrade guide

    We have just released Vanilla Framework 2.0, Canonical’s SCSS styling framework, and – despite our best efforts to minimise the impact – the new features come with changes that will not be automatically backwards compatible with sites built using previous versions of the framework.

    To make the transition to v2.0 easier, we have compiled a list of the major breaking changes and their solutions (when upgrading from v1.8+). This list is outlined below. We recommend that you treat this as a checklist while migrating your projects.

With Regolith, i3 Tiling Window Management Is Awesome, Strange and Easy

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Regolith Linux brings together three unusual computing components that make traipsing into the i3 tiling window manager world out-of-the-box easy.

Much of the focus and attraction -- as well as confusion -- for newcomers to the Linux OS is the variety of desktop environments available. Some Linux distributions offer a range of desktop types. Others come only with a choice of one desktop.

i3 provides yet another option, but it is a much different choice that offers an entirely new approach to how you interact with the operating system.

Window managers usually are integrated into a full-fledged desktop system. Window managers control the appearance and placement of windows within the operating system's screen display. A tiling window manager goes one step further. It organizes the screen display into non-overlapping frames rather than stacking overlapping windows.

The i3 tiling window manager in Regolith Linux serves as what essentially becomes a standalone pseudo desktop. It automatically arranges windows so they occupy the whole screen without overlapping.

Read more

Security: John Deere, Windows, Debian, Ubuntu, and Mozilla Firefox

Filed under
Security
  • John Deere's Promotional USB Drive Hijacks Your Keyboard

    “The device itself, it’s pretty ingenious, actually,” the Reddit user said. “It’s an HID-compliant keyboard that, when connected detects what platform it’s on and automatically sends a keyboard shortcut to open a browser, and then it barfs the link into the address bar.”

  • New Variant of the Houdini Worm Emerges

    WSH RAT is currently being offered as a subscription, at $50 per month. The malware operators are actively marketing the malware as compatible with all Windows XP to Windows 10 releases, featuring automatic startup methods, and various remote access, evasion, and stealing capabilities.

  • Debian's Intel MDS Mitigations Are Available for Sandy Bridge Server/Core-X CPUs

    The Debian Project recently announced the general availability of a new security update for the intel-microcode firmware to patch the recently disclosed Intel MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) vulnerabilities on more Intel CPUs.

    Last month, on May 14th, Intel disclosed four new security vulnerabilities affecting many of its Intel microprocessor families. The tech giant was quick to release updated microcode firmware to mitigate these flaws, but not all the processor families were patched.

  • Canonical Outs New Linux Kernel Live Patch for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS

    Canonical released a new Linux kernel live patch for the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series to address the recently disclosed TCP Denial of Service (DoS) vulnerabilities.

    Coming hot on the heels of the recent Linux kernel security updates published earlier this week for all supported Ubuntu releases, the new Linux kernel live patch is only targeted at Ubuntu versions that support the kernel live patch and are long-term supported, including Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

  • Firefox Users Warned to Patch Critical Flaw

    Mozilla is urging users of its Firefox browsers to update them immediately to fix a critical zero-day vulnerability. Anyone using Firefox on a Windows, macOS or Linux desktop is at risk.

    The vulnerability, CVE-2019011707, is a type confusion in Array.pop. It has been patched in Firefox 67.0.3 and Firefox ESR 60.7.1.

    Mozilla announced the patch Tuesday, but the vulnerability was discovered by Samuel Groß of Google Project Zero on April 15.

    Mozilla implemented the fix after digital currency exchange Coinbase reported exploitation of the vulnerability for targeted spearphishing attacks.

    "On Monday, June 17, 2019, Coinbase reported a vulnerability used as part of targeted attacks for a spear phishing campaign," Selena Deckelmann, senior director, Firefox Browser Engineering, told TechNewsWorld. "In less than 24 hours, we released a fix for the exploit."

Tails 3.14.1 is out

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Web
Debian

This release is an emergency release to fix a critical security vulnerability in Tor Browser.

It also fixes other security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible.

Read more

Also: It's Time to Switch to a Privacy Browser

Games: A Year Of Rain, Evan's Remains, Dota Underlords, ISLANDERS, Nowhere Prophet, Fear The Rampager and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Daedalic Entertainment's new RTS "A Year Of Rain" will be coming to Linux

    This is really exciting news, as a huge fan of such RTS games, Daedalic Entertainment's "A Year Of Rain" looks really good and it turns out they're going to support Linux.

    Interestingly, back when it was first announced in March I did email Daedalic to ask about Linux support. They told me then, that they didn't really have any answer on it. However, it seems things have changed and they've decided Linux will be supported. On Steam, the developer said it's planned and it seems it may even happen during the Early Access period.

  • Evan's Remains, a beautiful-looking puzzle platformer with visual novel elements plans Linux support

    Evan's Remains from Matías Schmied and Whitethorn Digital is a new one to capture my interest. Blending a rather atmospheric puzzle platformer, with a little visual novel flair and it's planned for Linux.

  • Dota Underlords from Valve is now in open beta for Linux, mobile too

    Valve are doing some really impressive work with Dota Underlords, their new strategy game that everyone can now try.

    As a quick reminder on the gameplay: you go through rounds, picking heroes and placing them on the board, then you fight against the choices of other players and neutral enemies for loot. The actual battles are done by AI, with the tactical part based on your choices and positioning. You lose health based on the amount of enemy heroes left if they beat you and it's the last player standing to win.

    It's free and will remain free to play, with some sort of optional Battle Pass likely to come for cosmetic items in future. They have a lot more planned for it including: daily challenges, a level up system, a tournament system, seasonal rotation for heroes and more. They said that during the Open Beta Season, it will regularly see new features and updates.

  • Colourful city-builder 'ISLANDERS' has officially released for Linux and it's really lovely

    I don't think I've hit the buy button on Steam that quickly in a while, as ISLANDERS, a colourful city-builder is now officially out for Linux.

    Developed by GrizzlyGames, ISLANDERS is a minimalist strategy game for those who don't have hours to invest in resource management. Released back in April, the Linux version arrived yesterday along with a big update that also adds in a Sandbox Mode and the ability to undo your last building placement which sounds handy.

  • Roguelike deck-building game 'Nowhere Prophet' releasing on July 19th, looks very interesting

    Deck-building card-based games really are all the rage now! I'm okay with this, as I love them and I am excited to see what more developers do with it. Nowhere Prophet is one that looks great and it's out next month. Developer Sharkbomb Studios and publisher No More Robots have now confirmed the release date of July 19th. We got confirmation back in April, that Linux will be supported too.

    Set on planet Soma, this science-fiction post-apocalypse game mixes in two distinct modes of play. The first is the travel system, with you facing encounters across a procedurally generated map (so the game is different each time). If you enter combat, it switches into the turn-based card game mode.

  • Dead Cells "Fear The Rampager" update is live and it continues being awesome

    Still one of my top games, Dead Cells just got another big free update "Fear The Rampager" so it's time to jump back in for one more run.

    The big addition this time is the introduction of The Rampager. A new foe to challenge you that's currently haunting a variety of biomes in Boss Stem Cell 3 and higher.

  • Heroes of Hammerwatch updated and the Witch Hunter expansion is out now

    Crackshell have expanded their rogue-lite action-adventure game Heroes of Hammerwatch with a free update along with the great sounding Witch Hunter expansion.

    First up, the free update available for everyone adds in a few new features including new dungeon mechanics, companions, new drinks and a new statue if you have the Pyramid of Prophecy DLC. Additionally the free update has some performance improvements, more chest room variations, enemies can now be killed by poison and plenty of other balance changes.

  • My Friend Pedro | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Steam Play

    My Friend Pedro running through Steam play.

MX GNU/Linux, A Desktop Mix of Mepis and Antix without Systemd

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

MX is an interesting desktop GNU/Linux based on Debian but without Systemd. It's powered with simple and user friendly interface thanks to XFCE Desktop. It's actually very lightweight, shipped with a lot of MX own tools (including remastering and tweaking ones), available in 32-bit and 64-bit architectures. The latest version, MX-18 "Continuum", equipped with ability to search and install Flatpak applications. Last but not least, MX exists as collaboration between two big communities, Mepis and antiX, hence the name MX since 2008 up to today. I hope you enjoy my overview below introducing several good points of MX.

Read more

Optane SSD RAID Performance With ZFS On Linux, EXT4, XFS, Btrfs, F2FS

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

This round of benchmarking fun consisted of packing two Intel Optane 900p high-performance NVMe solid-state drives into a system for a fresh round of RAID Linux benchmarking atop the in-development Linux 5.2 kernel plus providing a fresh look at the ZFS On Linux 0.8.1 performance.

Two Intel Optane 900p 280GB SSDPED1D280GA PCIe SSDs were the focus of this round of Linux file-system benchmarking. EXT4, XFS, Btrfs, and F2FS were tested both on a single Optane SSD and then in RAID0 and RAID1 with two of these high performance drives. Additionally, ZFS On Linux 0.8.1 was tested on this system both with a single drive and in RAIDZ. For putting the Optane SSD performance in reference, there is also a standalone result provided of a Samsung 970 EVO 500GB NVMe SSD with EXT4. In case you missed out earlier Optane 900P benchmarks on Linux from 2017, see them here for this still very competitive SSD. While there are now the 905P SSDs, the 900P models remain available and cheaper hence why going for those when picking up two of them for this round of Linux RAID testing. All of the file-systems were tested using the Linux 5.2 Git kernel and running with their stock/default mount options. The EXT4/XFS/F2FS RAID was tested using Linux MD RAID while the Btrfs and ZFS RAID were using their file-system's native RAID capabilities.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Marcus Lundblad: Midsomer Maps

    Since it's been kindof a tradition for me to do some blogging around midsomer, I thought we might as well keep with that tradition this year as well… And there's been some nice news in latest beta release of Maps, 3.33.3.

  • How to install Zorin OS on a computer from USB stick or DVD
  • Clear Linux Gets Questions Over Steam Integration, Other Plans For This High-Perf Distro

    Auke Kok of Intel / Clear Linux carried out the distribution's first ask-me-anything session today where he fielded questions ranging from Steam to under-served software projects. 

    Auke is a long-time Intel Linux developer and also one of the prominent contributors to Clear Linux going back to its early days. Among the highlights from Wednesday's "ask me anything" included: 

    - When asked about Fedora's flicker-free boot process, Auke pointed out that it's made possible in part through work spearheaded at Intel around the frame-buffer/fastboot code worked on by their graphics team. While it's great the shared work happening, from the Clear Linux perspective they are more focused on achieving lightning fast boot times over a slick boot process. But they may look into it in some aspect moving forward, but their priority is just to have a quick booting system.

  •  

  • Open Source Is Critical To Linode: Christopher Aker, Founder & CEO

    Linode is celebrating its 16th anniversary. Linode actually predates Amazon Web Services. We sat down with the founder and CEO of Linode, Christopher Aker, to talk about the history of Linode and how it enabled developers to reap the benefits of cloud before AWS came to exist.

Funding for GNU and Debian

Filed under
GNU
Debian
  • Paying (some) Debian developers

    In an offshoot of the Debian discussion we looked at last week, the Debian project has been discussing the idea of paying developers to work on the distribution. There is some history behind the idea, going back to the controversial Dunc-Tank initiative in 2006, but some think attitudes toward funding developers may have changed—or that a new approach might be better accepted. While it is playing out with regard to Debian right now, it is a topic that other projects have struggled with along the way—and surely will again.

    The discussion on the debian-devel mailing list about possibly recommending dh for building packages that we covered headed into a bit of a tangent on "difficult packaging practices" that might be preventing new people from contributing. From there, Andreas Tille brought up the longstanding idea of creating some kind of Debian equivalent to the Ubuntu personal package archives (PPAs). Raphaël Hertzog suggested that it might be worth using some of the money in the Debian bank account to fund the development of such a feature.

  • Double the movement: Inspire someone to explore free software

    Thank you for being part of our exceptionally generous community. Your interest in our mission is what got us where we are, in position to succeed if we keep at it. While it's incredible to have hundreds of thousands of subscribers around the world, we need to connect with millions if we're to realize a world free of proprietary software. This spring, we have set ourselves goals to reach 200 new members and 400 donations before July 15th, and to achieve them, we need your help. Please take this moment to publicly share your passion for free software. If each free software supporter inspires just one other, we can double our strength.

    We tasked free software designer Raghavendra Kamath with creating some inspiring visual images to help us spread our message further. You can find these banners and profile images, including their embed codes, here. Sharing these images online might inspire someone to explore free software, and may give reasons for you to educate your friends and family about why free software matters. Use the hashtag #ISupportFreeSoftware when you share the images online or on your social media.

Programming/Development Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • ‘I code in my dreams too’, say developers in Jetbrains State of Developer Ecosystem 2019 Survey

    Last week, Jetbrains published its annual survey results known as The State of Developer Ecosystem 2019. More than 19,000 people participated in this developer ecosystem survey. But responses from only 7000 developers from 17 countries were included in the report. The survey had over 150 questions and key results from the survey are published, complete results along with the raw data will be shared later. Jetbrains prepared an infographics based on the survey answers they received. Let us take a look at their key takeaways:

  • Python and "dead" batteries

    Python is, famously, a "batteries included" language; it comes with a rich standard library right out of the box, which makes for a highly useful starting point for everyone. But that does have some downsides as well. The standard library modules are largely maintained by the CPython core developers, which adds to their duties; the modules themselves are subject to the CPython release schedule, which may be suboptimal. For those reasons and others, there have been thoughts about retiring some of the older modules; it is a topic that has come up several times over the last year or so.

    It probably had been discussed even earlier, but a session at the 2018 Python Language Summit (PLS) is the starting point this time around. At that time, Christian Heimes listed a few modules that he thought should be considered for removal; he said he was working on a PEP to that end. PEP 594 ("Removing dead batteries from the standard library") surfaced in May with a much longer list of potentially dead batteries. There was also a session at this year's PLS, where Amber Brown advocated moving toward a much smaller standard library, arguing that including modules in the standard library stifles their growth. Some at PLS seemed to be receptive to Brown's ideas, at least to some extent, though Guido van Rossum was apparently not pleased with her presentation and "stormed from the room".

  • When and How to Win With New Programming Languages
  • Understanding Data Ops and it's impact on Application Quality

Latest Security FUD

Filed under
Security

Linux Foundation, Kernel, and Linux Plumbers Conference

Filed under
Linux
  • Tech Giants Join Linux Foundation's Connected-Cities Efforts [Ed: Just surveillance capitalism inside Zemlin's PAC. Reminder: the spokesperson of the "Linux" Foundation is the former spokesperson of James Clapper.]
  • Generalized events notification and security policies

    Interfaces for the reporting of events to user space from the kernel have been a recurring topic on the kernel mailing lists for almost as long as the kernel has existed; LWN covered one 15 years ago, for example. Numerous special-purpose event-reporting APIs exist, but there are none that are designed to be a single place to obtain any type of event. David Howells is the latest to attempt to change that situation with a new notification interface that, naturally, uses a ring buffer to transfer events to user space without the need to make system calls. The API itself (which hasn't changed greatly since it was posted in 2018) is not hugely controversial, but the associated security model has inspired a few heated discussions.

  • Detecting and handling split locks

    The Intel architecture allows misaligned memory access in situations where other architectures (such as ARM or RISC-V) do not. One such situation is atomic operations on memory that is split across two cache lines. This feature is largely unknown, but its impact is even less so. It turns out that the performance and security impact can be significant, breaking realtime applications or allowing a rogue application to slow the system as a whole. Recently, Fenghua Yu has been working on detecting and fixing these issues in the split-lock patch set, which is currently on its eighth revision.

    [...]

    With a split lock, the value needs to be kept coherent between different CPUs, which means assuring that the two cache lines change together. As this is an uncommon operation, the hardware design needs to take a special path; as a result, split locks may have important consequences as described in the cover letter of Yu's patch set. Intel's choice was to lock the whole memory bus to solve the coherency problem; the processor locks the bus for the duration of the operation, meaning that no other CPUs or devices can access it. The split lock blocks not only the CPU performing the access, but also all others in the system. Configuring the bus-locking protocol itself also adds significant overhead to the system as a whole.

    On the other hand, if the atomic operation operand fits into a single cache line, the processor will use a less expensive cache lock. This all means that developers may increase performance and avoid split locks by actions like simply correctly aligning their variables.

  • Real-Time Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Real-Time Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! The PREEMPT_RT patch set (aka “The Real-Time Patch”) was created in 2004 in the effort to make Linux into a hard real-time designed operating system. Over the years much of the RT patch has made it into mainline Linux, which includes: mutexes, lockdep, high-resolution timers, Ftrace, RCU_PREEMPT, priority inheritance, threaded interrupts and much more. There’s just a little left to get RT fully into mainline, and the light at the end of the tunnel is finally in view. It is expected that the RT patch will be in mainline within a year, which changes the topics of discussion. Once it is in Linus’s tree, a whole new set of issues must be handled. The focus on this year’s Plumbers events will include:

Renaming openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE

At the 2019 openSUSE Conference, the openSUSE board discussed governance options at length. There will evidently be an official statement on its conclusions in the near future, but that has not been posted as of this writing. It would appear, though, that the board chose a foundation structure over the other options. A German registered association (e. V.) would have been easier to set up than a foundation, but an association has weaker restrictions so it could potentially shift its focus away from the openSUSE mission. Joining another umbrella group seemingly lacked appeal from the beginning, as did the option of doing nothing and leaving things as they are now.

The stated purpose of the foundation is to make it easier for openSUSE to accept donations and manage its own finances — things that are hard for the project to do now. The foundation structure, in particular, allows the project to enshrine its core objectives (such as support for free software) into the DNA of the organization, making it hard to divert the foundation toward some other goal. A foundation also allows openSUSE to retain its current governing board and membership structure.

In the absence of an official statement from the board, details on the decision and the reasoning behind it can be had by watching this YouTube video of a question-and-answer session with the board at the openSUSE Conference.

One motivation for the change that wasn't highlighted in the board session, but which was an undercurrent in the discussions leading up to it, is a desire for more independence from SUSE in general driven by concerns about what the company might do in the future. Such worries are not entirely irrational, even though by all accounts SUSE management is fully supportive of openSUSE now. A company's attitude can change quickly even in the absence of external events like a change of ownership. If SUSE were to be sold yet again, the new owners could take a rather dimmer view of the openSUSE project.

Read more

Security: National Security Agency (NSA) in Coreboot and NSA Back Doors in Microsoft Windows Out of Control

Filed under
Security
  • The NSA Is Looking To Contribute To A New x86 Security Feature To Coreboot

    The US National Security Agency (NSA) has developers contributing to the Coreboot project.

    Eugene Myers of the NSA under the Information Assurance Research, NSA/CSS Research Directorate, has been leading some work on an STM/PE implementation for Coreboot.

  • Coreboot Adds Support For Apollolake-Powered UP-Squared SBC Maker Board

    Coreboot now supports the UP Squared, the new single board computer / maker board based on an Intel Apollo Lake SoC.

    Not to be confused with the $35 Atomic Pi Intel SBC that aims to compete directly with the Raspberry Pi, the UP Squared is a higher-tier ~$150 board with more connectivity and options. The UP Squared offers dual Gigabit Ethernet, HDMI / DP, eMMC, mini-PCIe x1, MIPI CSI, 40-pin header, two USB 3.0 ports, and other options. Both Microsoft Windows and an assortment of Linux distributions are supported.

  • All-In-One Malware ‘Plurox’ Can Hack Your PC In ‘Three Different Ways’ [Ed: When you mean to say Microsoft Windows (with its NSA back doors) but instead you say "PC" as if Microsoft has nothing to do with it]

    The SMB plugin mentioned previously is essentially a repackaged NSA exploit called EternalBlue that was publicly leaked in 2017.

    The plugin allows bad actors to scan local networks and spread the malware to vulnerable workstations via the SMB protocol (running the EternalBlue exploit).

    But that’s not all. UPnP is actually the sneakiest and most nasty plugin among all. It creates port forwarding rules on the local network of a compromised system and uses it to build backdoors into enterprise networks bypassing firewalls and other security measures in place.

  • Windows 10 gets a lot of little fixes – and Microsoft reminds us it’ll start to force updates [Ed: Forced NSA back doors. Gone are the days of controlling our PCs if they contain proprietary software because "for our security/safety" (of course!) remote software modifications will be imposed on us.]

Audiocasts/Shows: TLLTS, FLOSS Weekly and BSD Now

Filed under
Interviews
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 814
  • FLOSS Weekly 534: All Things Open 2019

    All Things Open is a polyglot technology conference focusing on the tools, processes and people making open source possible. Target audience includes designers, developers, decision makers, entrepreneurs and technologists of all types and skill levels.

  • OpenZFS in Ports | BSD Now 303

    The ZFS on FreeBSD project has renamed the userland and kernel ports from zol and zol-kmod to openzfs and openzfs-kmod
    The new versions from this week are IOCTL compatible with the command line tools in FreeBSD 12.0, so you can use the old userland with the new kernel module (although obviously not the new features)
    With the renaming it is easier to specify which kernel module you want to load in /boot/loader.conf: > zfs_load=”YES”
    or > openzfs_load=”YES”
    To load traditional or the newer version of ZFS

Programming: Firefox Binaries, Python, GCC, Kotlin, C++ and Rust

Filed under
Development
  • Stack Write Traffic In Firefox Binaries

    I became interested in how much CPU memory write traffic corresponds to "stack writes". For x86-64 this roughly corresponds to writes that use RSP or RBP as a base register (including implicitly via PUSH/CALL). I thought I had pretty good intuitions about x86 machine code, but the results surprised me.

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: membernator -- validate membership cards

    I currently work part-time for student unions in Montreal and they often have large general assemblies (more than 2000 people). As you can likely figure out by yourself, running through paper lists to validate people's identity is a real PITA and takes quite a long time.

    For example, even if you have 4 people checking names, if validating someone's identity takes 5 seconds on average (that's pretty fast), it takes around 40 minutes to go through 2000 people.

    Introducing membernator, a python program written using pygame that validates membership cards against a CSV database! The idea is to use barcode scanners to scan people's school ID cards and see if they are in our digital lists. Hopefull, it will make our GA process easier for everyone.

  • Developer Toolset 8.1 and GCC 8.3 now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

    Red Hat Developer Toolset delivers GCC, GDB, and a set of complementary development tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux via two release trains per year. We are pleased to share that Developer Toolset 8.1 with GCC 8.3 is now available and supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

    The Red Hat Developer Toolset 8.1 release includes many enhancements and changes, but here are a few of the highlights...

  • Finished converting all the buildfiles to groovy and downgraded to gradle 4.4.1; week 3+ update

    During the third week I mainly spent my time converting all the buildfiles in the "dist" task graph to groovy from kotlin-dsl.

    I finished converting all the build files from kotlin-dsl to groovy. I then proceeded to build the entire project with only the subprojects required for the dist task so that we can avoid converting all the uneeded subproject buildfiles to groovy. Ran tests on the binary obtained from the newly onverted project and compared it to the test result on an original unconverted project. Since the new project only contains the needed subprojects this new project is unable to run all the needed tests. So inorder to overcome this we copy the binaries built by our new project and run the tests using the original unaltered projects. The compiler test task we need is "compilerTest"; this is the only aplicalbe test for out build binary from the "dist" task. I have run "distTest" for the unaltered project and uploaded it here; "distTest" task encompasses compilerTest task within it. Here is the log of the "compilerTest" run on the geenrated binaries.

  • Intel Developing "Data Parallel C++" As Part Of OneAPI Initiative

    Intel announced an interesting development in their oneAPI initiative: they are developing a new programming language/dialect.

    Intel originally began talking about oneAPI last December for optimizing code across CPUs / GPUs / FPGAs and as part of "no transistor left behind." Early details sounded similar to HSA while with time more bits have become known while the big reveal isn't expected until Q4'2019 when it will enter beta.

    We've known OpenCL will take a big role and their LLVM upstreaming effort around their SYCL compiler back-end. The SYCL single-source C++ programming standard from The Khronos Group we've expected Intel to use as their basis for oneAPI while now it seems they are going a bit beyond just targeting SYCL.

  • You can't buy DevOps [Ed: Poor article about mere buzzwords]
  • This Week in Rust 291
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More in Tux Machines

Benchmarking The Experimental Bcachefs File-System Against Btrfs, EXT4, F2FS, XFS & ZFS

Bcachefs is the file-system born out of the Linux kernel's block cache code and has been worked on the past several years by developer Kent Overstreet. Our most recent benchmarking of Bcachefs was last year, so with the prospects of Bcachefs potentially being staged soon in the mainline Linux kernel, I ran some benchmarks using the latest kernel code for this next-generation file-system. Those unfamiliar with this copy-on-write file-system can learn more at Bcachefs.org. The design features of this file-system are similar to ZFS/Btrfs and include native encryption, snapshots, compression, caching, multi-device/RAID support, and more. But even with all of its features, it aims to offer XFS/EXT4-like performance, which is something that can't generally be said for Btrfs. Read more

Games: TheoTown, Prison Architect and More

  • Retro themed city-builder 'TheoTown' has now added Linux support

    TheoTown, developed by blueflower is a city-builder with a retro style that looks to be inspired by the classic Sim City 2000 and it's now available on Steam for Linux. Released on Steam earlier this month, TheoTown is also available on mobile but the PC version is a full and proper game with no in-app purchase nonsense. On Android at least, the game is very highly rated and I imagine a number of readers have played it there so now you can pick it up again on your Linux PC and continue building the city of your dreams. So far, the Steam user reviews are also giving it a good overall picture.

  • Reminder: Update your PC info for the next round of statistics updates

    This is your once a month reminder to make sure your PC information is correct on your user profiles. A fresh batch of statistics is generated on the 1st of each month.

  • Prison Architect gains a new warden with Double Eleven, free update incoming

    After Paradox Interactive acquired the rights to Prison Architect from Introversion Software, they've now announced that Double Eleven will be handling future updates. Double Eleven are a well-known developer and publisher of quite a number of titles, with them also previously been responsible for the console versions of Prison Architect so it seems like a pretty good fit as they already worked with the game.

  • Steam To Drop Support For Ubuntu

    Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution and that’s why it gets the attention of big companies like steam to design software for it. But recently, Linux community is kind of unhappy over Canonical decision on dropping Ubuntu 32-bit packages. The community already discussed that in case Ubuntu drops 32-bit packages support in upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 or future releases, it’d create big problems including Wine users and Linux gamers. And here comes the first news from Steam, the gaming platform. Pierre-Loup Griffais from Valve tweeted that Ubuntu 19.10 or any future Ubuntu releases will not be officially supported by Steam. He also said that the team will work on to minimize the breakage for existing users and thinking to focus on any other Linux distribution.

  • Canonical to Continue Building Selected 32-Bit i386 Packages for Ubuntu 19.10, Azul Systems Announces Zulu Mission Control v7.0, Elisa v. 0.4.1 Now Available, Firefox Adds Fission to the Nightly Build and Tails Emergency Release

    After much feedback from the community, Canonical yesterday announced it will continue to build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS. The statement notes that Canonical "will also work with the WINE, Ubuntu Studio and gaming communities to use container technology to address the ultimate end of life of 32-bit libraries; it should stay possible to run old applications on newer versions of Ubuntu. Snaps and LXD enable us both to have complete 32-bit environments, and bundled libraries, to solve these issues in the long term."

  • OpenVIII, an in-development open source game engine for Final Fantasy VIII

    Any fans of Final Fantasy VIII reading? You're going to want to keep an eye on the in-development game engine OpenVIII. While it doesn't seem like it's currently playable, plenty of work has already gone into OpenVIII to work with "video support, music support, audio support, in-game menu" and more. The project is currently classed by the developer as a "pre-prototype" so don't go getting any hopes up yet about playing Final Fantasy VIII natively on Linux.

  • Littlewood hasn't been out for long, but this peaceful RPG has a lot to like about it

    Entering Early Access last week, Sean Young's peaceful RPG Littlewood is a game for those who like to relax a little. Note: Key provided directly by the developer. What happens after the world has been saved, after all the major battles have already been fought? That's exactly what Littlewood is all about, you saved the world and lost your memory so you're helping to re-build the town. In some ways, it actually reminds me of my experience with Forager. It's small, it's sweet and it doesn't feel like it's constantly begging for attention. Quite different in setting though of course, more along the lines of Stardew Valley but with less emphasis on constant farming. I love the building interface too, while it's quite simplistic it allows you to pick up trees, stones and move everything out of your way. Nothing feels annoying, so it's really sweet.

  • Cyberspace first-person shooter 'Black Ice' just had a massive upgrade

    Currently in Early Access, it has been a long time since Black Ice had an update to the "stable" version but the developer hasn't been sat idle. A massive update to the entire game just landed. Featuring some of what I showed off recently, Black Ice has come a very long was since the initial few releases making it a vastly more interesting game. One of the biggest changes, is an overhaul to the entire world design full of new areas, combat arenas with even more to come. Additionally, there's now some random events that will happen to also make the world seem a bit more lively. One server might try to hack another, so you can jump in and fight them all or sit back and watch the fireworks.

Android Leftovers

KDE Plasma 5.16.2 Desktop Environment Released with More Than 30 Bug Fixes

Coming just one week after the first point release, the KDE Plasma 5.16.2 maintenance update is here to add yet another layer of bug fixes with the ultimate goal to make the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment more stable and reliable for users. In particular, this second point release introduces a total of 34 changes across various core components and apps. "Today KDE releases a bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.16.2. Plasma 5.16 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds a week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important," reads today's announcement. Read more Also: Plasma 5.16.2