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Wednesday, 25 Nov 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story PinePhone becomes a DIY Linux laptop with this 3D printed keyboard Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2020 - 5:40pm
Story Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2020 - 5:27pm
Story Best Linux distros for Windows users in 2020 Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2020 - 5:10pm
Story Software: Glade, Ventoy, Istio and More Roy Schestowitz 1 23/11/2020 - 5:02pm
Story Awkward History of Linux and Latest of Reiser5 Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2020 - 3:33pm
Story Wine 6.0 Release Preparations Begin In Two Weeks Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2020 - 3:18pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2020 - 3:13pm
Story Kodi 19.x "Matrix" - Beta 1 Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2020 - 2:30pm
Story GParted Live 1.1.0-8 Stable Release Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2020 - 2:24pm
Story openmamba “light” with LXQt desktop Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2020 - 2:17pm

FSF Giving Guide: It's the thought that counts, so think freedom

Filed under
GNU

Even though we're still in the midst of the pandemic, the holiday season is upon us, and with it comes the time people around the world give gifts to show their appreciation. Companies are starting their sales early this year, and as usual are focusing heavily on tech gifts. But before you buy anything, you should make sure that that gift isn't putting your friend or family member under unjust control.

Each year, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) publishes a new version of our Ethical Tech Giving Guide as a way to help concerned individuals make sure that the presents they plan on giving their loved ones don't come with dangerous consequences for their freedom. Many of these devices have been through our Respects Your Freedom (RYF) certification program, meaning that they and the retailers that offer them have been held to the highest scrutiny when it comes to matters of software freedom.

In the last year, some of the devices on this list have become scarcer, highlighting the pressing need for more hardware that is compatible with a fully free system. Some devices we recommend may only be available from a certain retailer. While it may not be readily available in local stores, offering a gift like the Libiquity Taurinus X200 is perfect for someone who has just become aware of free software's importance and is interested in going further, or for the free software activist in your life who would love for you to support a company trying to do the right thing. Even better, by avoiding popular but ethically unacceptable devices from manufacturers like Apple, you're letting your loved ones know that you care about them too much to compromise their freedom. By choosing a device like the upcoming Librem 5 mobile phone from the Giving Guide, you're walking a different path from everyone else, choosing the road to freedom instead of subjugation.

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EasyOS version 2.5 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

EasyOS 2.5 is the latest in the 2.x Buster-series, built with Debian 10.6 DEBs. As well as the DEBs, other packages are updated, including SeaMonkey 2.53.5, and the Linux kernel is now 5.4.78. There have been many infrastructure and utility fixes and improvements, including hardware-profiling for the CPU temperature monitor. The single most significant application change relative to the previous release is the new BluePup bluetooth manager, replacing Blueman (though Blueman is in the repository, so can be installed if needed). The Multiple Sound Card Wizard has been integrated with BluePup.

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Release notes: Easy Buster version 2.5

Wine 5.22 Released

Filed under
Software

  • WineHQ - Wine Announcement - The Wine development release 5.22 is now available.
    The Wine development release 5.22 is now available.
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - C runtime libraries converted to PE.
      - Use fontconfig cache for faster startup.
      - Video playback improvements.
      - 3DES cipher support.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.22.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.22.tar.xz
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine compatibility layer development release 5.22 is up, video fixes and 3DES support | GamingOnLinux

    The Wine 5.22 release also brings with it a note about 36 bug fixes which include fixes for: Guild Wars 2 Launcher, Elite Dangerous Launcher, Fallout New Vegas, Wargaming.net Game Center, Ghostrunner, Overwatch and more.

  • Wine 5.22 Released With Video Playback Improvements, More PE Conversion - Phoronix

    We should be getting near the end of the Wine 5.xx development releases with the timed Wine 6.0 release likely to come in early 2021, but for now Wine 5.22 is out with the latest feature work for running Windows programs and games on Linux and macOS.

    Wine 5.22 continues the trend of converting more components into PE portable executable format, this time around the C run-time libraries have been converted to PE. Wine 5.22 also now uses the fontconfig cache for yielding faster start-ups, video playback improvements, 3DES cipher support was added to Wine, and around 36 known bug fixes.

Tinker Board 2 SBC advances to RK3399

Filed under
Linux

Asus is prepping a “Tinker Board 2” SBC that runs Linux on a Rockchip RK3399 with up to 4GB LPDDR4, GbE, WiFi/BT, optional 16GB eMMC, 3x USB, Type-C with DP, HDMI, MIPI-DSI/CSI, and 40-pin GPIO.

In 2017, Asus launched its first maker-friendly SBC with an open-spec, community backed Tinker Board SBC. Now, French site Clubic (translated) has posted images and specs from an Asus press release about a Tinker Board 2 follow-up that advances from a quad-core, Cortex-A17 Rockchip RK3288 to a hexa-core -A72 and -A53 Rockchip RK3399. Liliputing picked up the news here.

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Top 25 Linux Interview Questions

Filed under
Linux

The IT industry depends heavily on Linux. So, if you are trying to get into one of the IT industry positions, you need to be good at Linux. As someone trying to get a position, it is essential to impress the interviewer with your knowledge, and that’s where interview preparations come in.

To help you in your search for top Linux interview questions, you have come to the right place. In this article, we will list the top 25 Linux interview questions and answer them. However, our answers are mostly for reference purposes, and you are encouraged to research and create your own understanding of the subject matter. By doing so, you can cope with other questions and even answer stuff that requires deep knowledge.

Linux is more secure than other operating systems due to its open-source licensing. This means that hundreds of developers work on the code and make it secure compared to other operating systems which are developed in a closed ecosystem. Apart from it being open source, other reasons make Linux more secure. The reasons include...

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Garuda Linux “Black Eagle” Released With A New Dr460nized edition

Filed under
Linux

After the release of v201007 “Golden Eagle” last month, the Garuda team has now announced a new major version 201119 codenamed “Black Eagle” of its Arch-based Garuda Linux.

Unsurprisingly, this Garuda v201119 also introduces a new edition called dr460nized. It is a clean, lightweight, and modified KDE version with a lot of blurs, macOS like app menu at the top, Latte as dock and fish shell.

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Direct: Garuda Linux "Black Eagle" (201119)

Announcing coreboot 4.13

Filed under
Hardware

coreboot 4.13 was released on November 20th, 2020.

Since 4.12 there were 4200 new commits by over 234 developers.
Of these, about 72 contributed to coreboot for the first time.

Thank you to all developers who again helped made coreboot better
than ever, and a big welcome to our new contributors!

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • TUXEDO InfinityBook S 14 Linux Laptop Gets Tiger Lake CPU Upgrade, Thunderbolt 4 Support

    TUXEDO Computers unveiled today the sixth refresh to their TUXEDO InfinityBook S 14 Linux laptop with 11th Gen Intel Core processors, Intel Xe graphics, and USB-C 4.0 / Thunderbolt 4 support.

    The TUXEDO InfinityBook S 14 laptop is the perfect computer for people who are always on the go and also love Linux. It features a 16.8 mm thin, magnesium alloy case and weights less than 1.1 kg, while also offering huge battery life to keep you working all day long `and a lid tiltable at 180 degrees.

  • macOS Big Sur launch appears to cause temporary slowdown in even non-Big Sur Macs

    Mac users today began experiencing unexpected issues that included apps taking minutes to launch, stuttering and non-responsiveness throughout macOS, and other problems. The issues seemed to begin close to the time when Apple began rolling out the new version of macOS, Big Sur—but it affected users of other versions of macOS, like Catalina and Mojave.

    Other Apple services faced slowdowns, outages, and odd behavior, too, including Apple Pay, Messages, and even Apple TV devices.

    It didn't take long for some Mac users to note that trustd—a macOS process responsible for checking with Apple's servers to confirm that an app is notarized—was attempting to contact a host named ocsp.apple.com but failing repeatedly. This resulted in systemwide slowdowns as apps attempted to launch, among other things.

  • Opera Adds Built-in Player for Spotify, Apple Music & YouTube Music | UbuntuHandbook

    A new update for Opera web browser 72 was released a day ago, which introduced a built-in music player for Spotify, Apple Music, and YouTube Music.

    In the browser’s sidebar beneath the messengers section, a “Player” icon is there allows you to login and enable music playback with Spotify, Apple Music and YouTube Music.

    The playback can be controlled via the standard playback buttons on your keyboard or by hovering over the Player icon in the sidebar, where a mini playback control menu will appear.

Servers: Kubernetes, Sysadmin and More

Filed under
Server
  • Kubectl: Developer tips for the Kubernetes command line - Red Hat Developer

    Get started with in-cluster configuration, sudo-like user impersonation, and the new kubectl debug command in the kubectl Kubernetes CLI.

  • New developer onboarding features in Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 - Red Hat Developer

    Developers asked for a more intuitive path to the developer perspective, so we’ve created one.

    Starting with OpenShift 4.6, non-privileged users logging into the OpenShift console for the first time will land on the developer perspective by default.

    Once in the developer perspective, first-time users are offered a guided tour of the user interface (UI). Developers who opt-in to the tour are guided through UI areas, starting with the topology view. The demonstration in Figure 1 shows how to launch the guided tour.

  • Time management: must-have tools and strategies for sysadmins | Enable Sysadmin

    Learn to be intentional about planning out your daily tasks and remember to leave time for yourself, your family, and your friends.

  • Advantages of Using Linux Virtual Machine or Linux Server Hosting

    With Linux, you do not need to worry about security, and you can download software from the Internet. Many online sites offer you Linux hosting and Linux server hosting. However, you have to check for the reliability and quality of the website. It should be an established website with many years of experience.

    You can check the Linux hosting and Linux server hosting providers and determine which one will suit your requirements. They should have enough information on their website so that you can get all the relevant details. The website should also explain the technicalities well. The website should provide details about the services offered and the cost that you will have to pay.

Hackers' Devices and Programming

Filed under
Development
Hardware
  • SiFive Pushes Open Source RISC-V Silicon Closer to Prime Time | Data Center Knowledge

    The open source RISC-V silicon specification flexes it's muscle with a new developers' board its maker, SiFive, is calling a PC.

  • Read RFID and NFC tokens with Raspberry Pi | HackSpace 37
  • Python OS module Common Methods – Linux Hint

    Python is a popular general-purpose programming language of recent times. It provides many built-in modules and functions to perform specific tasks. Python OS module allows performing the operating system related tasks. The OS module comes pre-installed in Python. The OS modules have many built-in functions to retrieve and interact with the file system. This article explains some functions of the OS module with examples.

  • Vue.js Click Events – Linux Hint

    Vue.js is a very powerful, easy to learn, and approachable library that with the knowledge of HTML, CSS, and Javascript, we can start building web applications in it. Vue.js is built by combining the best features from already existing Angular and react Frameworks. It is a progressive and reactive Javascript framework that is used to build UIs (User Interfaces) and SPAs (Single-page Applications), which is why the developers love to code and feel freedom and comfort while developing applications in Vue.js.If we take a look at the Event Listening and Handling in Vue.js., we will know that it provides a “v-on” directive to listen and handle events. We can use the “v-on” directive to listen to the DOM and perform the required tasks. It also provides many event handlers. However, in this article, we will only learn and keep our focus on the click events. So, let’s get started!

Free Software Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
OSS
  • Call to apply for FSFE support for your local project

    It is no secret that the FSFE's activities are only possible with the priceless help of our contributors and supporters around Europe. In return we support local engagement with our expertise, information material, networks or even financially. To help formalize this process, we run our second call for FSFE community projects.

    From international campaigns to local information booths, our successful spreading of software freedom is based on many shoulders from active members within our community. This is why ever since the FSFE e.V. has been keen on supporting initiatives and activities from local FSFE groups to single supporters. We happily support you with our expertise, our information material, our networks or even financially.

  • DataStax optimizes Cassandra for Kubernetes with K8ssandra

    DataStax is creating a new way for users to get the open source Cassandra database running on the Kubernetes cloud-native platform, with the K8ssandra project released on Nov. 18.

    The release comes during the same week as the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2020 virtual event, which is hosted by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation to highlight the latest innovations across the Kubernetes landscape.

    Kubernetes is a container orchestration platform that has become increasingly popular as it helps to enables multi-cloud deployment for applications. Like many other database vendors, DataStax has been using what is known as a Kubernetes Operator to help users get the Cassandra database running on Kubernetes.

  • How to Give and Receive Technical Help in Open Source Communities

    “As a developer, it’s exciting and challenging to stay up to speed with the latest trends in technology. Every day, new languages, frameworks and devices capture our attention and spur conversations in meetups, forums and chats. However, our developer community is made of people, not tools, and it’s fascinating to explore its sociopolitical aspects. We are always beginners at some things and experts at others. Along the way from beginner to expert, we ask a lot of questions, but it can be intimidating to ask for help.”

    This is how Sonia Singla, Cloud Native Computing Foundation intern and mentee, kicked off her talk at this year’s Kubecon+CloudNativeCon North America. Fresh off her CNCF internship with Thanos and Outreachy placement at Mozilla, Singla took the lessons she’s learned over the last two years in both toxic and welcoming environments to offer advice for both how to give and receive technical help in open source communities.

  • New JOINUP Compatibility Checker Permalink

    The JLA analyses now more than 50 open licenses

    The main innovation of the JLA is the possibility to SELECT open licenses based on their content

    The JLA was also an example of synergy with the SPDX project of the Linux Foundation. The JLA adopted the SPDX license identifier as a standard and is linked with the license full text that is provided from the SPDX data base.

Security: Patches, Linux Format Special and POWER9 Problems

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox), Fedora (chromium, microcode_ctl, mingw-libxml2, seamonkey, and xen), openSUSE (slurm_18_08 and tor), Oracle (thunderbird), SUSE (buildah, firefox, go1.14, go1.15, krb5, microcode_ctl, perl-DBI, podman, postgresql12, thunderbird, ucode-intel, wireshark, wpa_supplicant, and xen), and Ubuntu (firefox and phpmyadmin).

  • Cyber insecurity | Linux Format

    Each year we proclaim it’s time to learn how to hack. But why? Jonni always gets angry at the subversion of the term ‘hacking’ and I can understand why. Hacking is fun, as is finding out how systems work and how to get them to do things they were never meant to do.

    With open source and the Linux ecosystem there’s an abundance of hacking fun to be had, and it’s no wonder all the key tools for learning how to hack – and actually hack – are developed and run out of Linux systems.

    For this year’s look at the world of hacking Jonni’s introducing you to the metasploit framework. This is a playground where you can learn, explore and develop hacking skills. It’s usually paired with Kali Linux, and we’re putting these on the Linux Format DVD, which makes a welcome return.

  • IBM POWER9 CPUs Need To Flush Their L1 Cache Between Privilege Boundaries Due To New Bug

    CVE-2020-4788 is now public and it's not good for IBM and their POWER9 processors... This new vulnerability means these IBM processors need to be flushing their L1 data cache between privilege boundaries, similar to other recent CPU nightmares.

    While IBM POWER9 allows speculatively operating on completely validated data in the L1 cache, when it comes to incompletely validated data that bad things can happen. Paired with other side channels, local users could improperly obtain data from the L1 cache.

    CVE-2020-4788 was made public this morning and is now causing all stable Linux kernel series to receive the mitigation that amounts to hundreds of lines of new code. The mitigation is flushing the L1 data cache for IBM POWER9 CPUs across privilege boundaries -- both upon entering the kernel and on user accesses.

Kernel: Linux Security and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Why eBPF is the Future of Linux and Cloud Native Networking

    For decades, IPtables has been the cornerstone of Linux networking, but that's no longer the case. Over the last few years, extended Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF) has emerged as a better option for Linux whether it's running on-premises, or more likely than not, in the cloud.

    What eBPF provides is a low-level interface to enable data packet transmission and control. On its own it has tremendous potential for networking. While there is lots of open source eBPF code now in the Linux kernel, on its own, it can be quite complex, which is where the open source Cilium project has been making inroads in the last few years.

    I first wrote on Cilium in 2017, when the project first got started and the company behind it - Isovlanet - was still shrouded in stealth. Cilium and Isovalent are led by CEO and co-founder Dan Wendlandt, who helped to create the OpenStack Quantum networking project and was a pioneer in the Software Defined Networking (SDN) industry at VMware.

    Last week, Isovalent emerged from stealth, along with $29 million in funding led by Andreessen Horowitz. Wendlandt and Andreessen Horowitz are hardly strangers; after he left VMware in 2016 he went to work as a partner at the venture capital firm, alongside fellow SDN pioneer and VMware alum Martin Casado.

  • [Mesa-dev] Intent to retire ancient driver support
    Sending this on to the list for visibility, since not everyone follows
    everything on gitlab. In this merge request:
    
    https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/mesa/mesa/-/merge_requests/7660
    
    I retire support for DRI drivers older than Mesa 8.0, which was
    February 2012. In particular this retires the ability for libGL to
    even load DRI1 drivers, which last existed in Mesa 7.11. We are not
    aware of any currently supported distros trying to ship both DRI1
    drivers and anything newer. In fact the only distro I'm aware of that
    ever _tried_ was RHEL 6, which goes into extended-life support at the
    end of the month, and which is currently shipping Mesa 11.0.7 and is
    thus _way_ behind the times in terms of hardware enablement.
    
    Eric Anholt suggested that glvnd is the better way to retain DRI1
    support at this point, and to that end there is also:
    
    https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/mesa/mesa/-/merge_requests/7674
    
    Which allows us to override the glvnd vendor name. xserver could then
    select a different name for DRI1 screens, and now you get
    parallel-installable Mesa packages, which could be nice for a bunch of
    reasons.
    
    If you still care about DRI1 support, I am very sorry, but hopefully
    !7674 (backported to 20.x) and a bit of polish to xserver should keep
    things working for you, and your feedback/testing would be greatly
    appreciated.
    
  • Mesa To Drop Support For Ancient Drivers - Phoronix

    The fallout should be minimal and hopefully not impact any Phoronix readers, but as Mesa rolls into 2021 it is looking to drop support for loading DRI1 graphics drivers.

    Back in 2011 the classic Radeon drivers were removed Adam Jackson of Red Hat is planning to remove the ability for Mesa's current libGL to be able to load DRI1 drivers. This is basically about trying to load old DRI1 drivers from Mesa pre-8.0 onto a system with the current Mesa libGL loader. Mesa has retained this ability for being able to load these classic DRI1 drivers but nearly nine years after old driver code was dropped from Mesa, phasing out this ability to load DRI1 drivers is now planned.

  • Arcturus No Longer Experimental - AMD Instinct MI100 Linux Support Is Ready - Phoronix

    Being sent in as a "fix" this week to the Linux 5.10 kernel is removing the experimental flag for the Arcturus GPU, days after AMD announced the MI100 accelerator at SC20.

    Going back to the summer of 2019 there have been Linux graphics driver patches for "Arcturus" as an evolution of GFX9/Vega but with not a lot being known about it. Much work was poured into this open-source driver code for Arcturus and the Linux support all squared away over the past year. This week it finally entered the limelight in the form of the AMD Instinct MI100 accelerator.

  • NVIDIA Is Working On Vulkan Support With RDMA Memory - Phoronix

    Well this will be interesting to see what NVIDIA use-case pans out... NVIDIA engineers are working on a Vulkan extension for making use of RDMA memory.

    Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) for zero-copy networking with high throughput and low latency is very common for cluster computing and other enterprise scenarios to allow direct memory access from one computer to another without the intervention of the CPU. NVIDIA now though is preparing to support RDMA memory usage in the Vulkan context.

TUXEDO InfinityBook S 14 Linux Laptop Gets Tiger Lake CPU Upgrade, Thunderbolt 4 Support

Filed under
Hardware

The TUXEDO InfinityBook S 14 laptop is the perfect computer for people who are always on the go and also love Linux. It features a 16.8 mm thin, magnesium alloy case and weights less than 1.1 kg, while also offering huge battery life to keep you working all day long `and a lid tiltable at 180 degrees.

And now the Linux laptop it gets even better thanks to the addition of the 11th Generation Intel Core i7-1165G7 “Tiger Lake” CPU with 4 cores and 8 threads, and integrated Intel Iris Xe high-performance graphics, as well as a full featured USB-C 4.0 port with Thunderbolt 4, DisplayPort 1.4b, and Power Delivery DC-In support.

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Security Patches in OpenSUSE and SUSE

Filed under
Security
SUSE
  • Two Tumbleweed Snapshots update PostgreSQL, Mesa

    Snapshot 20201117 provides the latest update of packages for the rolling release. Among the packages to update was Mozilla Thunderbird to version 78.4.3; the email client updated a Rust patch and brought in a new feature from a previous minor version that prompts for an address to be used when starting an email from an address book entry with multiple addresses. KDE’s Plasma 5.20.3 stopped the loading of multiple versions of the same plugin in the task manager KSysGuard and there were many other bug fixes for Plasma users. Four months of shell scripts were updated in the hxtools 20201116 version; one of the changes to gpsh changed the tmp location to /var/tmp, which was to avoid saving potentially large files to tmpfs. The Linux Kernel made a jump from 5.9.1 to 5.9.8, which had a change for Btrfs as well as several USB changes. Database package postgresql 13 had its first point release to 13.1, which took care of three Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures and fixed a time test case so it works when the USA is not observing daylight-savings time. The graphical tool for administering virtual machines, virt-manager slimmed down the filesystem device editor User Interface. Text editor vim had a fix for when a crash happens when using a popup window with “latin1” encoding and python 3.8.6 took care of CVE-2019-20916.

  • Guardicore and SUSE partner to help you protect your critical applications - SUSE Communities

    Within the cybersecurity segment, Guardicore stands out from the crowd with its Guardicore Centra Platform disrupting the legacy firewall market by implementing micro-segmentation in your organization. Their software-only approach is decoupled from the physical network, providing a faster alternative to firewalls. Built for the agile enterprise, Guardicore offers greater security and visibility in the cloud, data-center, and endpoint. It also ensures security doesn’t slow you down and thanks to SUSE environments, it allows you to code and deploy on demand

SolidRun's Latest

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • SolidRun launches i.MX 8M Plus SOM and devkit for AI/ML applications

    SolidRun already offers NXP based solutions with AI accelerators through products such as SolidRun i.MX 8M Mini SoM with Gyrfalcon Lightspeeur 2803S AI accelerator, or Janux GS31 Edge AI server with NXP LX2160A networking SoC, various i.MX 8M SoCs and up to 128 Gyrfalcon accelerators.

    All those solutions are based on one or more external Gyrfalcon AI chips, but earlier this year, NXP introduced i.MX 8M Plus SoC with a built-in 2.3 TOPS neural processing unit (NPU), and now SolidRun has just unveiled the SolidRun i.MX 8M Plus SoM with the processor together with development kits based on HummingBoard carrier boards.

  • SolidRun takes on Google's Raspberry Pi-like computer

    Israeli edge-computing outfit SolidRun has launched a new lineup of Raspberry Pi-like computers based on NXP's new i.MX 8M Plus application processor.

    SolidRun makes edge computing kit containing Arm-based and Intel chips. Earlier this year, it teamed up with application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chip manufacturer Gyrfalcon Technology to build the Arm-based, Linux Janux GS31 AI inference server.

  • [Repeated] SolidRun's i.MX8M Plus module launches with HummingBoard Mate board

    The iMX8M Plus CoM supports Linux (Debian 10 and Yocto 3.1 “Dunfell”) or Android 10 on dual- or quad-core models of the i.MX8M Plus. The module ships with up to 8GB LPDDR4-4000, with optional ECC, and has an eMMC socket. A module with 802.11 ac and Bluetooth 5.0 is optional.

Audiocasts/Shows/Videos: Proton, Self-Hosting, LibreOffice Videos and EXWM

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • The Beginner's Guide to Proton - YouTube

    Have you ever needed to force a Steam game to use a different version of Proton and not known how? Do you not see your Windows games in your Linux Steam client? Do you want to run the Windows version of a game, but it already has a Linux version?

  • Google Turning the Screw | Self-Hosted 32

    With rage in our hearts, we proclaim a Self-Hosted Google Photos replacement, and the only way to self-host your email.

    Plus our tips to manage and stream audiobooks.

  • New Beginner LibreOffice Tutorials and Videos from Paul Sutton

    LibreOffice’s documentation community creates handbooks, guides, tutorials and other resources to help users get the most out of the software. Everyone is welcome to join the team and help out – it’s a great way to build up experience for a possible career in technical writing!

    Paul Sutton is producing a series of blog posts and videos aimed at newcomers to LibreOffice, explaining some of the basics. He also has some extra videos here – check them out.

  • Doom Emacs And EXWM Are My New Window Manager - YouTube

    A few months ago, I took a brief look at EXWM which is an Emacs plugin that allows you to use Emacs as your window manager. And while I was impressed at how well EXWM can work as a window manager, I never really tried to live in it.

Games: Collabora, Civilization VI, Total War: WARHAMMER II and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Linux Syscall User Dispatch Close To Mainline For Better Handling Windows Games - Phoronix

    Earlier this year we reported on Linux kernel work for better handling Windows games/apps that make system call instructions that bypass the Windows API. Directly making the system calls without going through the WinAPI has become an increasingly common occurrence for modern Windows games, likely as part of their Digital Rights Management schemes. Syscall User Dispatch is now the latest take on that effort.

    The syscall user redirection support has been led by Collabora engineers working in cooperation with Valve. That work evolved into the "Syscall User Dispatch" feature that is now up to its seventh code revision and likely soon to be mainlined in the Linux kernel.

  • Collabora put up their patches for Linux Kernel work to help Windows games on Linux | GamingOnLinux

    Collabora, one of the companies working under contract for Valve to help improve Windows game emulation on Linux with the likes of Wine have now sent in some patches to the Linux Kernel mailing list for discussion.

    This is going to be another big step forward for compatibility, hopefully, to help with the likes of anti-tamper and DRM which often skip over the Windows API which causes issues for Linux and the Wine compatibility layer (and so Steam Play Proton too). You can get an overview of it in this previous article and also this article if you want some background on it all. To be clear: a Valve developer did mention it's not for anti-cheat.

  • Civilization VI - Babylon Pack is out now with the 'Heroes and Legends' mode | GamingOnLinux

    Civilization VI has a new DLC out with the Babylon Pack, part of the ongoing New Frontier Pass or you can buy it as a single DLC if you prefer. This brand new DLC follows on from the surprisingly fun free Pirates game mode update, that Firaxis Games released for everyone back in late October.

    This new content pack introduces Hammurabi as the leader of Babylon. The Babylon civilization excels at Science, as well as Government and Infrastructure. Additionally, it also brings with it a "Heroes and Legends" game mode which adds in legendary figures from various cultures as playable characters on the world.

  • Total War: WARHAMMER II – The Twisted & The Twilight announced for December | GamingOnLinux

    Total War: WARHAMMER II – The Twisted & The Twilight is the next expansion for the huge strategy game from Creative Assembly, SEGA and porting studio Feral Interactive. Arriving for Windows on December 3, Feral Interactive have confirmed that it will arrive on Linux (and macOS) "shortly" after Windows. This could be anything from a day to a few weeks, hopefully not long though.

    This Lords Pack for Total War: WARHAMMER II introduces two new Legendary lords for the Skaven and the Wood Elves. Each leads their own faction and features new characters, units, unique gameplay mechanics and narrative objectives.

  • Tenderfoot Tactics sold well enough to fund another game, more updates coming | GamingOnLinux

    Tenderfoot Tactics is probably one of the best games released this year. An open-world tactics RPG that mixed real-time exploration and turn-based tactical battles, with a really gorgeous simple visual style with bright colours.

    Badru, one of the team responsible for creating it mentioned in a recent update that they're working on another tactics RPG. This is because sales of Tenderfoot Tactics "are good enough that I'm likely going to be able to self-fund another game". Work hasn't stopped on Tenderfoot though, far from it.

  • Pharaoh-like isometric city builder Nebuchadnezzar to release February 17, 2021 | GamingOnLinux

    While there is an upcoming Pharaoh remaster (which has no Linux support plans), we also have the far more interesting looking Nebuchadnezzar.

    Nebuchadnezzar has been announced for release on February 17, 2021 and it will be coming with full Linux support from Nepos Games. If you love city-builders, you're going to want to take a look at this. In it you will experience "the mysterious history and culture of ancient Mesopotamia" with a campaign that has you rule over influential historical cities filled with complex monuments.

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