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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Some site news srlinuxx 2 01/11/2010 - 5:24pm
Blog entry PCLinuxOS KDE Full and Mini ISOS updated to 2010.11 Texstar 25/11/2010 - 2:16am
Blog entry KDE 4.5.4 now available for PCLinuxOS Texstar 02/12/2010 - 8:24pm
Blog entry gave it up srlinuxx 1 06/02/2011 - 12:14pm
Blog entry Best Hard Drives? srlinuxx 10 13/04/2011 - 6:00pm
Blog entry Damn you Kubuntu srlinuxx 1 25/01/2011 - 6:40pm
Blog entry Pandora FMS 3.2 has been released. geniususer 05/01/2011 - 5:54pm
Blog entry Printer Woes gfranken 5 19/01/2011 - 2:19am
Blog entry Happy Holidays srlinuxx 1 30/12/2010 - 5:33pm
Blog entry Enlightenment packages updated post beta 3 Texstar 27/12/2010 - 2:10am

Librem 5 on Privacy

Filed under
Gadgets

  • Tourists on Tech’s Toll Roads

    I had assumed the toll would be $1 or so–everything else up to that point had been relatively affordable in Cancun–but was shocked when I slowed down and discovered the toll was $10! This was about three times what the Golden Gate Bridge charged back then! I felt taken advantage of, yet once we got to the toll booth, there was no easy way to turn around or avoid it, so we just paid the fee and I blamed myself for being a dumb tourist who should have researched things better.

    We spent the day in Chichen Itza and on the way back I vowed I would not be taken advantage of again. This time we would take the indirect, free route through the jungle. I was so glad I made that choice as I passed through one village after another and saw local people living their lives. While it wasn’t as fast or smooth a road as the toll road, I felt like less of a tourist on a curated tour of someone else’s property and more like I was seeing what “real” Cancun was like.

  • GPS Tuning the Librem 5 Hardware

    Society is getting pretty used to the idea that the data and applications on phones are completely controlled by large corporations.

    Purism is working hard to change that with the Librem 5.

    Because of the market capitalization and duopoly control of the phone OS vendors, the hardware tool vendors use are trapped into one of those two OSes (Android or iOS).

    [...]

    The available GPS antenna tuning procedure is a GPS simulator, but the simulator requires feedback from the phone OS to help tune the antenna. If you are on Android the simulator vendor provides an apk that converts the NMEA to a format that the tools can use to do the tuning.

    So now we have a tool to do the tuning but no way to use it.

Wiki.js: A Modern Open-source Wiki Engine for the Enterprise\

Filed under
OSS

Whenever there is a mention of a Wiki, the first thing that always come to thoughts is: Wikipedia.org. So first let's draw a like between Wiki and Wikipedia.

A Wiki is a software that built to ease collaborative writing and editing processes for teams. They are designed with a specific goal to provide productive writing environment for writers and editors, as well as a set of management tools for moderators and managers.

Wikis have been around since the dawn of the modern internet as we knew it, and the most popular Wiki system is MediaWiki which Wikipedia uses.

Over the years we used many wiki engines in work, starting from MediaWiki, DokuWiki, PmWiki, Wikkawiki, and TiddlyWiki. All of them are still popular wiki engines with loyal communities.

[...]

Wiki.js is a fully customizable and modular wiki engine written entirely in JavaScript. It comes with a rich set of features, and works smoothly on different systems and environments.

It's also a blazing fast web application, with an eye-candy design, furthermore, It supports many database interfaces with primary support for PostgreSQL (Note that the other database engines may be dropped in the next major release).

With a developer-friendly tool set, developer can integrate Wiki.js with any existing system as they can build modules, and create custom themes for it.

Wiki.js is a perfect solution for scientists, researchers, business managers, writers, historians, software developers and technical writers. It's also a polished solution for the enterprise. Here in this article we will explain why.

Read more

Switch to Linux with these top distros

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Regular contributor Jon Honeyball has fallen for the charms of Linux Mint – and we can understand why – but Mint is far from the only flavour on offer. Each distro has a different style and skillset, with variants to suit every taste.

In this instance, we’re more interested in usability than we are in raw numbers, as this is about the computing experience as much as it’s about what you can do with each OS.

Moreover, we’ve cut each candidate greater slack than we’d usually be prepared to do. We had issues with each distro – without exception – when installing them on our current-specification laptop, spanning wobbly Wi-Fi, touchpads that stopped working, mute speakers and, in some cases, distributions that wouldn’t install at all.

This is by no means an unusual occurrence in the world of Linux, which often works on a system of trial and error. Linux has a reputation as being the sole province of hardcore tech-heads, and while that's not quite true any more, it certainly not for the faint of heart, and we'd advise anyone who's worried about using a command-line interface to turn back now.

The winner, then, isn’t so much the quantifiably “best” open-source operating system on test, but rather the one we’d be most likely to stick with if it was time to wave goodbye to Windows altogether.

Read more

Fragments – A Modern BitTorrent Client for Gnome Desktop

Filed under
Software
GNOME

Fragments is an open-source GTK+ 3 BitTorrent client with a modern and easy to use user interface.

Read more

today's OSS leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Tracy Miranda Joins CD Foundation as New Executive Director

    In Miranda's previous role at CloudBees, she served as the Director of Open Source Community. She has used her impressive technical, community building, writing and speaking skills to improve the Jenkins, JenkinsX, and CI/CD developer community. The CDF welcomes her extensive experience and excitement as we work to establish best practices and industry specifications for the world's fastest growing projects.

    Join the CD Foundation for a two-day virtual event, CDCon Oct 7-8, focused on improving the world's capacity to deliver software with security and speed. Become part of the conversation that drives continuous delivery by meeting peers, sharing ideas, and talking to industry leaders on all things software delivery and DevOps.

  • How Free Software Powers Cloud Services

    For a long time, there was a hard-and-fast division between two legal classes of software. Free or open source software could be copied, changed, and redistributed. Proprietary or closed software was closely controlled by the vendor, and its use was encumbered with restrictions. There are other categories of software that lie somewhere between these two extremes (such as software that can be viewed but not changed and redistributed). In this article, however, we stick to the categories of free and proprietary and explore the relationship between cloud services and free software.

  • WordPress Sites Attacked in Their Millions

    Wordfence, which itself produces a plugin for the platform, revealed news of the zero-day bug at the start of September. It affects File Manager which, as the name suggests, is a plugin that helps users to manage files on their WordPress sites.

    The plugin is installed on around 700,000 WordPress sites, and although Wordfence estimates that only around 37%, or 262,0000, are still running a vulnerable version, this hasn’t stopped attackers from trying their luck against a much larger number of users.

  • LibreOffice and Google Summer of Code 2020: The results

    This year, LibreOffice was once again a mentoring organization in the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) a global programme focused on bringing more student developers into free and open source software development. We ran six projects – and all were finished successfully. Students and mentors enjoyed the time, and here we present some of the achievements, which should make their way into LibreOffice 7.1 in early February 2021!

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Markdown

    Markdown is a plain text formatting syntax created by John Gruber in 2004. It’s designed to be easy-to-read and easy-to-write.

    Readability is at the very heart of Markdown. It offers the advantages of plain text, provides a convenient format for writing for the web, but it’s not intended to be a replacement for HTML. Markdown is a writing format, not a publishing format. You control the display of the document; formatting words as bold or italic, adding images, and creating lists are just a few of the things we can do with Markdown. Mostly, Markdown is just regular text with a few non-alphabetic characters included, such as # or *.

  • Tarsnap – cleaning up old backups

    This is a great example of Tarsnap deduplication and compression. I have 5 years of backups taking up only 96G and the latest backup is 113G.

  • login_ldap added to -current

    The code is based login_ldap port, but uses our own aldap implementation instead of openldap.

  • How young people can run their computer programs in space with Astro Pi
  • Git Essentials

    While Git tools and add-ons abound, these seven utilities can help any user make the most of Git.

    Git, the version control system originally written by Linus Torvalds, is one of the most widely used Linux commands. Like other popular commands, such as apt or vim, an entire ecosystem of tools has grown up around it. In fact, Debian’s stable repository alone lists over 60 secondary tools whose names start with “git” and around 70 with unique names.

  • 2020.37 Fundamentally Raku

    Want to quickly learn about the fundamentals of Raku with a book? Raku Fundamentals by Moritz Lenz has just arrived on the physical bookshelves as well as on the virtual ones. Formerly known as “Perl 6 Fundamentals”, the second edition has been completely updated and has a chapter on Cro web services added. Be sure to leave a review when you have become the owner of a copy!

  • Zydeco::Lite

    Today I released Zydeco::Lite, a re-implementation of Zydeco but just using standard Perl syntax. So for example, class { ... } becomes class(sub { ...});.

    This has the advantage of much faster compile time, similar run time speed, fewer dependencies, and compatibility with older versions of Perl before the keyword API was introduced. Of course, in some circumstances these aren't important concerns, so the nicer syntax of the full Zydeco will be preferred.

  • Deploying serverless Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 1

    Red Hat OpenShift Serverless recently became GA, and with it came new options for application deployment. This article introduces one of those new options, Knative Serving. I provide an overview of OpenShift Serverless and Knative Serving, then show you how to deploy a Node.js application as a Knative Serving service.

  • OpenJDK 15 Reaches GA With Garbage Collector Promotions, Tossing Out Solaris + SPARC

    OpenJDK 15 is out today as the latest general availability release for this open-source Java implementation.

This PinePhone Multi-Distro Image Lets You Run 13 Distros on the Linux Phone

Filed under
Linux

Created by developed Ondřej Jirman, the 13 in 1 multi-distro demo image includes 13 different Linux distributions made specifically for the PinePhone Linux phone. Why demo image? Simply because it lets you try all these distros without having to install them on the device.

The PinePhone multi-distro demo image currently includes the following distributions: Arch Linux ARM, KDE Neon, Lune OS, Maemo Leste, Mobian, postmarketOS with fbkeyboard, postmarketOS with GNOME, postmarketOS with Phosh, postmarketOS with Plasma Mobile, postmarketOS with sxmo, PureOS, Sailfish OS, and Ubuntu Touch.

Read more

KDE Akademy 2020 Recap

Filed under
KDE

By and large the technical infrastructure, both of the event and my own, held up. Over the course of the event a number of ideas for improving remote event experience came up though, such as those for Plasma collected in task T13570.

Some of the important social interactions during a physical events are missing at a virtual event, the creation of the hallway BBB rooms helped a lot with this though. It’s still not the same as having dinner with a small group for example, but it nevertheless enabled discussions on random topics, fun and hacking for hours after the official schedule had ended for the day.

Another very positive aspect is that the virtual setup not only enabled many people to participate that otherwise might not have been able to attend at all, but also let people say hello again that weren’t that active in recent years.

As said before we should find a way to retain remote participation in post-pandemic physical events for this reason.

Read more

Also: Presenting Kontrast

Graphics Leftovers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Graphics Driver Patches Revived For Per-Client Engine Activity

    One of the interesting Intel Linux graphics driver patches to be sent out last year were for per-client engine reporting to allow on a per-application/process basis to see how the GPU's render/blitter/video engines were being utilized.

    That work for per-client "engine busyness" reporting went through a few rounds of review but as of Linux 5.9 there still isn't the support within Intel's i915 kernel driver.

  • Vulkan Present Timing Extension With Aim To Avoid Stuttering

    The Vulkan System Integration working group has decided to publish their work-in-progress extension on VK_EXT_present_timing as their effort to expose the presentation engine's display details and better allow scheduling a present to happen at a specific time.

    VK_EXT_present_timing is a big effort about helping to reduce stuttering and use-cases like better handling of variable refresh rate setups and other scenarios in wanting to ensure the presentation of a frame/image happens on schedule to avoid anomalies.

  • Intel Graphics Compiler 1.0.4944 Brings Many Minor Optimizations

    The Intel Graphics Compiler (IGC) that is used by their Linux OpenCL/Level-Zero compute stack as well as now being used by their Windows graphics driver and potentially their Linux OpenGL/Vulkan drivers in the future is out with a new release.

    IGC releases tend to come frequent with a large team working on this open-source graphics compiler code while the 1.0.4944 milestone is a bit of a larger release.

  • X.Org Developer's Conference 2020

    After DebConf, Linux Plumbers and Akademy, the lineup of great virtual conferences continues this week with the 2020 edition of X.Org Developer's Conference (XDC), the leading event for developers working on all things Open graphics, including the Linux kernel, Mesa, DRM, Wayland and X11.

    Taking place entirely online for the first time, XDC 2020 brings a packed schedule of talks, workshops and lightning talks spread out over three days. Collaborans will giving two presentations & a lightning talk during the week, for which you can find full details below. The entire conference will be live-streamed on YouTube (Day 1, Day 2 & Day 3), however if you would like to take part in any of the discussions, there's still time to register (free of charge)!

  • AMD Radeon Navi 2 / VCN 3.0 Supports AV1 Video Decoding

    It turns out the Radeon RX 6000 series will have AV1 hardware video decode capabilities.

    In addition to Intel Xe / Tigerlake and the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 series supporting AV1 hardware decoding, it's now firmed up that the next-gen Navi 2 GPUs will also have AV1 decode.

    As previously reported, the AMD next-gen GPUs feature VCN 3.0 for Video Core Next. The previous VCN 3.0 Linux/open-source patches didn't reveal AV1 capabilities but new patches out today confirm AV1 support with VCN3.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Debian Developers' Leftovers

Filed under
Debian

  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2020

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Molly de Blanc: “Actions, Inactions, and Consequences: Doctrine of Doing and Allowing” W. Quinn

    There are a lot of interesting and valid things to say about the philosophy and actual arguments of the “Actions, Inactions, and Consequences: Doctrine of Doing and Allowing” by Warren Quinn. Unfortunately for me, none of them are things I feel particularly inspired by. I’m much more attracted to the many things implied in this paper. Among them are the role of social responsibility in making moral decisions.

    [...]

    One of the things I maintain is that we cannot be the best versions of ourselves because we are not living in societies that value our best selves. We survive capitalism. We negotiate climate change. We make decisions to trade the ideal for the functional. For me, this frequently means I click through terms of service, agree to surveillance, and partake in the use and proliferation of oppressive technology. I also buy an iced coffee that comes in a single use plastic cup; I shop at the store with questionable labor practices; I use Facebook. But also, I don’t give money to panhandlers. I see suffering and I let it pass. I do not get involved or take action in many situations because I have a pass to not. These things make society work as it is, and it makes me work within society.

  • David Bremner: Debcamp activities 2018
  • Ciano

    There is a new application available for Sparkers: Ciano

Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, GNOME 3.38, Late Night Linux and More

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

  • Cabin Fever | LINUX Unplugged 371

    Friends join us to discuss Cabin, a proposal that encourages more Linux apps and fewer distros.

    Plus, we debate the value that the Ubuntu community brings to Canonical, and share a pick for audiobook fans.

  • GNOME 3.38 - Tour of the New Features, and a few thoughts

    It's that time of year again, where the new version of GNOME is upon us. Like every 6 months, this release includes a bunch of improvements to the desktop experience, and will be included in Ubuntu 20.10, Fedora 33, and will hit Arch and other rolling releases pretty quickly.

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 98

    How do we fix the broken Internet? We try to find solutions that don’t mean resorting to regulation. Plus Arm is sold again, Ubuntu community rumblings, a packed KDE Korner, and more.

  • Ripcord: Time To Uninstall The Official Discord Client

    I've been trying out a lot of these 3rd party discord clients lately like 6cord and Gtkcord and they're all missing something fundamental, but finally I've discord Ripcord which is an almost perfect client, basically the only thing that it's missing is video calls but I can always use the web client for that anyway.

  • Python Podcast: Simplified Data Extraction And Analysis For Current Events With Newspaper

    News media is an important source of information for understanding the context of the world. To make it easier to access and process the contents of news sites Lucas Ou-Yang built the Newspaper library that aids in automatic retrieval of articles and prepare it for analysis. In this episode he shares how the project got started, how it is implemented, and how you can get started with it today. He also discusses how recent improvements in the utility and ease of use of deep learning libraries open new possibilities for future iterations of the project.

Devices: Banana Pi, Firmware in Your Firmware, Amlogic/Arm and Arduino

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi: Banana Pi maker touts this new rival board with Amlogic chip and 4GB RAM

    Chinese SinoVoip has teased a Raspberry Pi-style single-board computer, the Banana Pi BPI-M5, with an Amlogic S905X3 four-core Cortex-A55 processor.

    The Raspberry Pi rival features a system on chip with 4GB of LPDDR4 RAM, 16GB of eMMC storage, four USB 3.0 ports, Gigabit Ethernet, an HDMI port, and just like its fruity rival, a 40-pin GPIO (general-purpose input/output) rack to connect other devices.

  • Putting The Firmware In Your Firmware

    Performing over-the-air updates of devices in the field can be a tricky business. Reliability and recovery is of course key, but even getting the right bits to the right storage sectors can be a challenge. Recently I’ve been working on a project which called for the design of a new pathway to update some small microcontrollers which were decidedly inconvenient.

    There are many pieces to a project like this; a bootloader to perform the actual updating, a robust communication protocol, recovery pathways, a file transfer mechanism, and more. What made these micros particularly inconvenient was that they weren’t network-connected themselves, but required a hop through another intermediate controller, which itself was also not connected to the network. Predictably, the otherwise simple “file transfer” step quickly ballooned out into a complex onion of tasks to complete before the rest of the project could continue. As they say, it’s micros all the way down.

  • Low-cost Amlogic S905L2 TV Boxes Show Up on Aliexpress for $20+

    Amlogic has plenty of variants to its S905 processors, and so far I had never heard about Amlogic S905L2 processor that can be found in some Android 9.0 TV boxes sold for a little over $20 including shipping.

    There are only two such TV boxes listed with the quad-core Cortex-A53 processor so far, and they are basically the same X7 model except for different storage and memory configuration.

  • Nvidia’s Arm Acquisition Raises Licensing Questions

    This could accelerate an industry shift away from Arm designs to RISC-V, according to a Reuters source.

  • Get ready to Explore IoT with Arduino Education

    This week we are launching our Arduino Explore IoT Kit, which allows high school and college students to take their first steps in building connected devices. Educators can make a complex subject simple – explore the Internet of Things right now with Arduino Education.

    Aimed at the beginner, there is a complete set of easy to follow online projects providing students with a gateway into the digital world of connected objects and how people work together.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Improve your time management with Jupyter

    JupyterLab and Jupyter Notebook provide a great environment to scrutinize my laptop-based life.
    My exploration is powered by the fact that almost every service I use has a web application programming interface (API). I use many such services: a to-do list, a time tracker, a habit tracker, and more. But there is one that almost everyone uses: a calendar. The same ideas can be applied to other services, but calendars have one cool feature: an open standard that almost all web calendars support: CalDAV.

  • PyDev 8.0 released (17 years of PyDev, typing support, MyPy and Debugger)

    As with the previous release, this release keeps on improving the support for type hinting and MyPy.

    On the MyPy front, besides showing an error it will also show the related notes for a message on the tooltip (which would previously be available only in the output view) and MyPy processes are no longer launched in parallel when using the same cache folder (as this could end up making MyPy write wrong caches which required the cache folder to be manually erased).

    In the type inference front there are multiple improvements to take advantage of type hints (such as support for Optional[] in code completion, handle types given as string and following type hints when presenting an option to create a new method in a class).

    The debugger had a critical fix on the frame-evaluation mode (the mode which works by adding programmatic breakpoints by manipulating bytecode) which could make it skip breakpoints or even change the behavior of a program in extreme cases.

  • EuroPython 2020: First batch of edited videos available

    We’re happy to release the first 30 cut videos of EuroPython 2020.

  • Changes in chemfp 3.4

    In a previous essay I talked about the new licensing model in the recent chemfp 3.4 release. In short, no-cost academic licensing is now available, a pre-compiled version of the package, with some restrictions on use, is available for no-cost use on for Linux-based OSes.

    The 3.4 release had the unofficial title back in action. I took time off from development to (among other things) write a paper about the chemfp project and take parental leave for our second kid.

    [...]

    There are a number of small tool improvements, like adding a --help-formats command-line option to give more detailed information about the support format types and options for each of the toolkits. (Previously much of this information was available from --help but that lead to information overload.)

    One nice change is that simsearch now accepts a structure query as command-line input or a file, rather than an FPS file. Simsearch will read the target file to get the fingerprint type, then use that to parse the query structures correctly.

  • Command Line Interfaces in Python

    Adding the capability of processing Python command line arguments provides a user-friendly interface to your text-based command line program. It’s similar to what a graphical user interface is for a visual application that’s manipulated by graphical elements or widgets.

    Python exposes a mechanism to capture and extract your Python command line arguments. These values can be used to modify the behavior of a program. For example, if your program processes data read from a file, then you can pass the name of the file to your program, rather than hard-coding the value in your source code.

  • Python Software Foundation: Answer these surveys to improve pip's usability

    The pip team has been working on improving the usability of pip since the start of this year. We've been carrying this work out remotely - by interviewing pip users, by sending short surveys, and doing usability tests of new pip functions.

    We want to thank everybody who is contributing input to this work and are taking part in this research, which is still ongoing. We've learned a lot about who uses pip and how you use it. This has helped the team make decisions to improve pip, such as error messages and documentation to help you fix dependency conflicts.

    Our team has put together a User Experience (UX) section in pip's documentation to tell you about this UX work. It covers what has happened so far, how you can contribute, and what is coming in the future.

  • Python 101: An Intro to Working with JSON

    JavaScript Object Notation, more commonly known as JSON, is a lightweight data interchange format inspired by JavaScript object literal syntax. JSON is easy for humans to read and write. It is also easy for computers to parse and generate. JSON is used for storing and exchanging data in much the same way that XML is used.

    [...]

    Python’s json module uses the dump() function to serialize or encode an object as a JSON formatted stream to a file-like object. File-like objects in Python are things like file handlers or objects that you create using Python’s io module.

  • TDD in Python with pytest - Part 3

    This is the third post in the series "TDD in Python from scratch" where I develop a simple project following a strict TDD methodology. The posts come from my book Clean Architectures in Python and have been reviewed to get rid of some bad naming choices of the version published in the book.

    What I introduced in the previous two posts is commonly called "unit testing", since it focuses on testing a single and very small unit of code. As simple as it may seem, the TDD process has some caveats that are worth being discussed. In this chapter I discuss some aspects of TDD and unit testing that I consider extremely important.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #438 (Sept. 15, 2020)

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • [RFC] nvfs: a filesystem for persistent memory

    I am developing a new filesystem suitable for persistent memory - nvfs. The goal is to have a small and fast filesystem that can be used on DAX-based devices. Nvfs maps the whole device into linear address space and it completely bypasses the overhead of the block layer and buffer cache.

  • Red Hat Has Been Working On New NVFS File-System

    Yet another new file-system being worked on for the Linux/open-source world is NVFS and has been spearheaded by a Red Hat engineer.

    NVFS aims to be a speedy file-system for persistent memory like Intel Optane DCPMM. NVFS is geared for use on DAX-based (direct access) devices and maps the entire device into a linear address space that bypasses the Linux kernel's block layer and buffer cache.

  • Optimizing a Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation ISO image

    Modifying Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation media is not a supported process, but this handy workaround may be useful to you. Please see this solution on the Red Hat Customer Portal for more information and other options that you may wish to consider for your environment.

    Not everyone has high-speed network connections to locations where they need to install Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Customers often ask how they can reduce the installation media to make delivery over slower networks faster. I walk you through the steps to build a custom, small RHEL installation ISO. The default RHEL 7.8 ISO is over 4GB in size; these steps show you how to create a RHEL 7.8 ISO that is 1GB in size and supports a smaller RHEL installation.

  • IBM Contributing A2O Processor Core To OpenPOWER Community

    IBM announced today at the OpenPOWER Summit 2020 that they are contributing the A2O POWER processor core and Open Cognitive Environment to the OpenPOWER community.

    The A2O processor core is now open-source as a POWER ISA core for embedded use in SoC designs. The A2O offers better single threaded performance over its predecessor and supports 2-way SMT, PowerISA 2.07, and a modular design.

  • IBM and Red Hat: Nearly two decades of Linux innovation across computing architectures

    In the decades since its inception, Linux has become synonymous with collaboration, both at a technical and organizational standpoint. This community work, from independent contributors, end users and IT vendors, has helped Linux adapt and embrace change, rather than fight it. A powerful example of this collaboration was the launch of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 2.1 in 2002, heralding the march of Linux across the enterprise world. Today, Red Hat Enterprise is a bellwether for Linux in production systems, serving as the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform to power organizations across the world and across the open hybrid cloud.

    All of this innovation and industry leadership wouldn’t have been possible without a strong partner ecosystem, including the close ties we’ve long had with IBM. IBM was one of the first major technology players to recognize the value in Linux, especially RHEL. As IBM Z and IBM LinuxONE celebrate 20 years of powering enterprise IT today, this benchmark provides further validation of the need for enterprise-grade Linux across architectures, especially as the requirements of modern businesses change dynamically.

  • Achievement unlocked: How we revamped the Red Hat Learning Subscription dashboard

    The final destination of a journey is what usually has the most focus, but it’s also important to understand the steps it took to arrive there. This certainly holds true for learning, especially as you work to achieve something as big as a Red Hat certification. You ultimately want that tangible object that says "I have the knowledge and I can prove it," but what about the milestones that marked your progress to get to that result? The achievements earned along the way that consistently reminded you that you are on the right path? Understanding the small goals in pursuit of larger ones helps you keep motivated to continue progressing.

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 Achieves NIAP Common Criteria Certification

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 has achieved Common Criteria Certification as well as Commercial Solutions for Classified (CSfC) Status.

  • Should Modern Developers Care About Mainframe?

Games: Jackbox, GLITCHED, Death Road to Canada, Hard Vacuum and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Jackbox Party Pack 7 Launches October 15 on Windows PC, Linux, Mac, and other “Major Platforms”

    They announced the game would launch October 15th for Windows PC, Linux, Mac (all via Steam), and other “major platforms”- assumedly Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.

    For those unfamiliar with prior Jackbox games, only one player needs to own the game to host, while other players can play via their smartphone or any device that can connect to the internet. This means people sitting in the same room with friends, or across the internet can join in wacky word, doodle, and speech based games.

    Along with the returning Quiplash (challenging players to give hilarious answers which are then voted on), new games include The Devils and the Details, Champ’d Up, Talking Points, and Blather Round.

  • Modern point and click adventure Crowns and Pawns: Kingdom of Deceit gains a demo

    Until September 18, you can try out a demo for the upcoming modern point and click adventure Crowns and Pawns: Kingdom of Deceit. The demo going live for a limited time is part of the event season, specifically for the Europe focused Digital Dragons.

    "Crowns and Pawns, inspired by point-and-click classics such as Broken Sword, Still Life, Syberia and others, brings the less explored history of Europe to the world of adventurers. Experience the legendary stories of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, beware of the villainous branch of the KGB, solve puzzles and follow hints to reveal the secrets of the king who was never crowned."

    [...]

    Crowns and Pawns: Kingdom of Deceit will be supporting Linux at release, and it seems like it's in pretty good shape already going by some time spent in the demo.

  • GLITCHED is a slick-looking upcoming 2D RPG where an NPC becomes aware of you - the player

    A game where the unexpected hero is an NPC inside a game world that's glitching out so badly the NPC becomes aware of you? GLITCHED sounds pretty wild.

    "When a glitch appears in the video game world of Soren, an NPC named Gus becomes aware of you- the player. Travel together to solve the mystery of the glitch and save Gus's friends, hometown, and digital world. As the story unfolds, Gus might start to question what role you play in his world."

    [...]

    As it turns out, it actually had a Kickstarter campaign way back in 2016 which clearly mentioned Linux support. Since it had been a long time, and it has now appeared on Steam as an upcoming title we reached out to the developer about this. They confirmed Linux support continues, although they will be officially only supporting Ubuntu.

  • The Humble Better Futures Bundle is up for more budget gaming

    Gaming on a budget? Humble Bundles are a good way to fill your library and there's a new one up with the just launched Humble Better Futures Bundle.

    As usual, Linux supported / Linux builds will be highlighted.

  • Death Road to Canada gets a major upgrade with more to come

    Face off against large groups of zombies while taking a scenic road trip with Death Road to Canada, which just had a big upgrade and there's more confirmed on the way.

    The 'KIDNEY Update' adds in a few big improvements for multiplayer co-op play, with a complete revamp of the character selection screen. They said it originally confused everyone so they remade it. Now any other player connected locally (or Steam Remote Play) can hit start and bring up a character select menu. Sounds great.

    Additionally, if you're out or normal recruits the new player can pick the '?' icon to be a 'Vermin Recruit' which has low stats but they regenerate every mission so anyone can still take part. They said they plan to expand this feature if it proves to be popular.

  • Try the demo for Scrabdackle, a 2D action adventure starring a novice wizard

    If the fullscreen mode for you only gives you a small window, simply toggle it in the options and for me that seems to sort it out properly into fullscreen. It's obviously an early work in progress, and it's a demo so issues are to be expected. Other than that, it worked great. Scrabdackle is another game made with the free and open source Godot Engine, awesome to see more developers go for it.

  • Amnesia: Rebirth from Frictional Games confirmed for launch on October 20

    The latest horror experience from Frictional Games with Amnesia: Rebirth now has an official release date of October 20 with Linux support.

    Just when you were planning for a quiet and casual 2020 Halloween right? Well, think again. Time to get your spare pants at the ready. Amnesia: Rebirth is a sequel to Amnesia: The Dark Descent released back in 2010 so it's releasing not too far off the 10th anniversary.

    In the new trailer to go along with the announcement, we get a short look into the twisted story behind Amnesia: Rebirth. The protagonist, Tasi Trianon, finds herself in the desolate landscape of the Algerian desert, battling against her fears and pain as she seeks out answers. She must do everything and anything to survive. She is Tasi.

  • Vibrant twin-stick slasher Breakpoint releases September 24 - you need check it out

    We need to talk about Breakpoint because it's now confirmed to be releasing with Linux support on September 24 and I think you need to put this on your wishlists. Mentioned before here on GOL early in August because it looked interesting but I didn't realise just how brilliant the idea actually was.

    You've played twin-stick shooters but what if they took away ranged weapons? There's no pew-pew lasers or firing tons of rockets here. Instead, you get an axe or a sword, it's a melee twin-stick slasher soaked in neon and your weapons explode destroying things around you after building up power. What more do you need?

  • A cancelled old RTS named 'Hard Vacuum' gets revived with OpenRA

    OpenRA, the highly versatile open source game engine you can use to play Command & Conquer, Red Alert, Dune 2000 and more is bringing a game back from the dead with Hard Vacuum.

SiFive to demo PC running new RISC-V SoC and unveil next-gen AI SoC

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Linux

SiFive will soon demo a Linux-driven, RISC-V based “FU740” SoC powering a PC and will unveil a new superscalar AI core. Interest in RISC-V is likely to increase if Nvidia completes its $40 billion acquisition of Arm.

At the Linley Fall Virtual Processor Conference starting Oct. 20, SiFive CTO Yunsup Lee will unveil a Linux-driven Freedom U740 (FU740) SoC based on its high-end U740 core and demonstrate it running on “the world’s first RISC-V PC.” In addition, SiFive Chief Architect and RISC-V architecture co-developer Krste Asanovic (see image at top) will announce a SiFive Intelligence AI core that appears to be related to the new U8-series.

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This week in KDE: everything happened

This was a pretty huge week for KDE. Apparently people had a lot of pent-up work, because right after Akademy finished last week, the floodgates started opening! Amazing stuff has been landing left and right every day this week! Some highlights are touch support in Dolphin, user-configurable per-view sort ordering in Elisa, optional Systemd startup, tons of Okular scrolling improvements, and much, much, much more. Read more

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Games: Black Ice, Mini Countries, Colmen's Quest and More

  • Dive into cyberspace this weekend with the latest Black Ice upgrade

    After finishing the first act of Black Ice story, this cyberpunk FPS continues getting content expansions and some of it sounds hilarious. Black Ice has always been a first-person shooter that leaned into the crazy and it's all the more enjoyable for it. Since it's in cyberspace, it doesn't need to conform to being normal in any shape or form. That's certainly true when you look at all the weapons types which are wild and varied - now even more so. The "Black Ice Enhancement Update" went live today, September 19, adding in new types of enemies like static Turrets which pump out bullets at you to mix up the gameplay. There's also E-Snails, which lob pools of fire (and other elements) at the ground and explode if you destroy the barrel on their back. More new enemies arrived with this including Mini-webcrawlers and E-xploding-snails which spawn as ambush waves to surprise you.

  • Give tiny countries a resource transport network in the upcoming Mini Countries

    Mini Countries from Yheeky Games looks like a fresh take on the transport-network puzzle strategy system. With each level being a new miniaturised country that you need to build up. What they've created looks like a very unique blend of ideas in other games like Rise of Industry, Train Valley 2 and the likes. Although, the developer cited inspiration from others like Mini Metro. You're responsible for building up your industry in each tiny country, and getting a network of it all going. Looks like a very sweet and streamlined approach to it.

  • Atmospheric fantasy turn-based RPG Colmen's Quest is out now

    Not long after we only just discovered it, the fantasy turn-based RPG Colmen's Quest is now considered finished and released and it also has an updated demo. "Colmen's Quest is a turn-based fantasy RPG. You play as Colmen, an aspiring monster hunter, who is on a quest to unveil a dark threat that haunts the village of Valkirk. You will explore Valkirk and its villagers, descend dusky dungeons, fight monsters and eventually collect a bunch of loot and treasures."

  • The Hotline Miami series is launching on Stadia soon, WWE 2K Battlegrounds out now

    Hotline Miami and Hotline Miami 2: Wrong Number are the next set of games to be announced for Google's game streaming service Stadia. They're both going to be releasing next week, on September 22. Both games are available on desktop Linux already, from Dennaton Games and Devolver Digital.

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EndeavourOS Releases September 2020 ISO with Linux 5.8, Improved Installation

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