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Sunday, 18 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Some site news srlinuxx 2 01/11/2010 - 5:24pm
Blog entry PCLinuxOS KDE Full and Mini ISOS updated to 2010.11 Texstar 25/11/2010 - 2:16am
Blog entry KDE 4.5.4 now available for PCLinuxOS Texstar 02/12/2010 - 8:24pm
Blog entry gave it up srlinuxx 1 06/02/2011 - 12:14pm
Blog entry Best Hard Drives? srlinuxx 10 13/04/2011 - 6:00pm
Blog entry Damn you Kubuntu srlinuxx 1 25/01/2011 - 6:40pm
Blog entry Pandora FMS 3.2 has been released. geniususer 05/01/2011 - 5:54pm
Blog entry Printer Woes gfranken 5 19/01/2011 - 2:19am
Blog entry Happy Holidays srlinuxx 1 30/12/2010 - 5:33pm
Blog entry Enlightenment packages updated post beta 3 Texstar 27/12/2010 - 2:10am

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Enthusiasts Plan Open-Source Raspberry Pi Tablet for 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

CutiePi's website claims the device will offer "a complete Raspberry Pi in a tablet form factor, minus the trouble of connecting monitor or power supply," for people to experiment with. We could see the CutiePi appealing to Raspberry Pi users curious about the platform's potential in new form factors. Its status as a completely open-source project could also attract the attention of people who dislike proprietary hardware.

The device itself currently includes an 8-inch display in a 209 x 124 x 12mm enclosure its creators said can be 3D-printed. Everything is powered by a "custom designed CM3 Lite carrier board" that (as the name suggests) features a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Lite. That product is essentially a Raspberry Pi Model 3 with a BCM2837 processor and 1GB RAM in a different form factor that's supposed to allow it to be used for industrial applications.
Relying on the Compute Model 3 Lite might be a bit of a letdown for Raspberry Pi enthusiasts hoping the CutiePi would offer more power. The Raspberry Pi Foundation released the Compute Model 3 Lite in 2017; the better-performing Compute Model 3+ debuted in January. The newer model, which is based on the Raspberry Pi Model 3B+, includes an improved thermal management system over its predecessor, as well as the BCM2837B0 processor.

CutiePi will also include a custom user interface on top of Raspbian made specifically for touchscreen devices. The tablet's creators said they're hoping to augment built-in apps, including a namesake terminal emulator built on top of Qt, with Raspbian PIXEL apps via XWayland. Projects created for the Raspberry Pi should also be relatively easy to port to CutiePi; that's the entire point of building a tablet on top of the existing pastry-evoking platform.

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Mozilla: Secure Connections, Localisation and Latest on Rust

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla revamps Firefox's HTTPS address bar information

    Mozilla plans to make changes to the information that the organization's Firefox browser displays in its address bar when it connects to sites.

    Firefox displays an i-icon and a lock symbol currently when connecting to sites. The i-icon displays information about the security of the connection, content blocking, and permissions, the lock icon indicates the security state of the connection visually. A green lock indicates a secure connection and if a site has an Extended Validation certificate, the name of the company is displayed in the address bar as well.

    Mozilla plans to make changes to the information that is displayed in the browser's address bar that all Firefox users need to be aware of.

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: August Edition

    We’re quickly approaching the deadline for Firefox 69. The last day to ship your changes in this version is August 20, less than a week away.

    A lot of content targeting Firefox 70 already landed and it’s available in Pontoon for translation, with more to come in the following days. Here are a few of the areas where you should focus your testing on.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 299

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

How to Distro Hop With a Web Browser

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Getting familiar with Linux up close and personal is easy to do with a free service provided by DistroTest.net, a website that allows testing without ISO downloads or local installations.

Are you a wandering Linux distro hopper looking for a way to streamline the selection process? Are you a Windows or macOS user who wants to try Linux?

Linux has countless distributions and dozens of desktop environments. How can you choose?

Now you can find the perfect combination of distro and desktop without leaving the Web browser running on your current operating system. Just point that browser to DistroTest.net.

The DistroTest website is a relatively new online Linux distro-vetting system. It even includes some BSD offerings if you have a hankering to venture into an operating system that is similar to Linux.

Read more

Also: Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 82

Linux on Devices: Aitech Defense Systems and Kontron

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Proven Linux OS Expanded to Aitech's Multi-core Remote I/O Subsystem

    Chatsworth, Calif. July 2019 - Aitech Defense Systems, Inc., a part of the Aitech Group, has ported the cost-effective, open source Linux operating system onto its intelligent Ai-RIO remote I/O interface unit (RIU). This modular small form factor (SFF) RIU internally networks up to eight expansion modules - or 'slices' - for extremely high density and low power in a compact physical space.

  • Tiny Type 10 module serves up Apollo Lake with 16GB DDR4

    Kontron’s Linux-friendly, COM Express Mini Type 10 form-factor “COMe-m4AL10” and “COMe-m4AL10 (E2)” modules are built around Apollo Lake SoCs and offer up to 16GB DDR4 and 64GB eMMC with up to -40 to 85°C (E2) support.

    Kontron announced two 84 x 55mm, Intel Apollo Lake based compute modules with 16GB DDR4. The Atom-powered, -40 to 85°C ready COMe-m4AL10 (E2) and Pentium and Celeron equipped, 0 to 60°C COMe-m4AL10 both support up to twice the RAM of the previous (circa-2017) industrial temp COMe-mAL10 (E2) and commercial COMe-mAL10 modules, which use DDR3L RAM.

Programming: Calamares/Qt, Effective Python Environment, API Language Standards

Filed under
Development
  • Lazy Qt Models from QVariant

    In Calamares there is a debug window; it shows some panes of information and one of them is a tree view of some internal data in the application. The data itself isn’t stored as a model though, it is stored in one big QVariantMap. So to display that map as a tree, the code needs to provide a Qt model so that then the regular Qt views can do their thing.

    [...]

    This is strongly oriented towards the key-value display of a QVariantMap as a tree, but it could possibly be massaged into another form. It also is pushy in smashing everything into string form. It could probably use data from the map more directly (e.g. pixmaps) and be even more fancy that way.

    Most of my software development is pretty “plain”. It is straightforward code. This was one of the rare occasions that I took out pencil and paper and sketched a data structure before coding (or more accurate: I did a bunch of hacking, got nowhere, and realised I’d have to do some thinking before I’d get anywhere – cue tea and chocolate).

    What I ended up with was a QVector of quintptrs (since a QModelIndex can use that quintptr as intenal data). The length of the vector is equal to the number of nodes in the tree, each node is assigned an index in the tree (I used depth-first traversal along whatever arbitrary yet consistent order Qt gives me the keys, enumerating each node as it is encountered). In the vector, I store the parent index of each node, at the index of the node itself. The root is index 0, and has a special parent.

  • An Effective Python Environment: Making Yourself at Home

    When you’re first learning a new programming language, a lot of your time and effort go into understanding the syntax, code style, and built-in tooling. This is just as true for Python as it is for any other language. Once you gain enough familiarity to be comfortable with the ins and outs of Python, you can start to invest time into building a Python environment that will foster your productivity.

    Your shell is more than a prebuilt program provided to you as-is. It’s a framework on which you can build an ecosystem. This ecosystem will come to fit your needs so that you can spend less time fiddling and more time thinking about the next big project you’re working on.

    Although no two developers have the same setup, there are a number of choices everyone faces when cultivating their Python environment. It’s important to understand each of these decisions and the options available to you!

  • Think carefully about API language standards

    The idea behind an API is pretty simple. The developer exposes functions from within the application in an abstracted manner. In doing so, the developer can change the functions within the application while all external systems can access the service minus the need for rewrites.

    But developers can hit a snag when they need to change the API library to support new functionality. This this action can -- and often does -- break calling systems that don't adhere to the framework of the original API.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (kernel, linux-4.9, otrs2, and tomcat8), Fedora (igraph and jhead), openSUSE (ansible, GraphicsMagick, kconfig, kdelibs4, live555, mumble, phpMyAdmin, proftpd, python-Django, and znc), Oracle (kernel and openssl), Red Hat (kernel, openssl, and rh-mysql80-mysql), Scientific Linux (kernel and openssl), Slackware (kernel), SUSE (containerd, docker, docker-runc, golang-github-docker-libnetwork and mariadb-100), and Ubuntu (linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-aws, linux-aws-hwe, linux-lts-xenial, linux-aws, linux-oem, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-snapdragon, php5, php7.0, php7.2, and wpa).

  • He tried to prank the DMV. Then his vanity license plate backfired big time.

    It seemed like a good idea at the time.

  • Thoughts from Defcon 27 – This is why I do what I do

    Every year, thousands of security professionals descend upon Las Vegas to take part in a series of conferences known as Hacker Summer Camp. This year, Black Hat, BSides Las Vegas, Defcon 27 and the Diana Initiative took up the majority of the conference space. So, what makes this one of the most relevant and successful security conferences?

Server: Surveillance Computing, Kubernetes Ingress, MongoDB 4.2, Linux Foundation on 'DevOps'

Filed under
Server
  • Linux and Cloud Computing: Can Pigs Fly? Linux now Dominates Microsoft Azure Servers [Ed: This is not about "Linux" dominating Microsoft but Microsoft trying to dominate GNU/Linux]

    Over the last five years things have changed dramatically at Microsoft. Microsoft has embraced Linux. Earlier in the year, Sasha Levin, Microsoft Linux kernel developer, said that now more than half of the servers in Microsoft Azure are running Linux.

  • Google Cloud Adds Compute, Memory-Intensive VMs

    Google added virtual machine (VM) types on Google Compute Engine including second-generation Intel Xeon scalable processor machines and new VMs for compute- and memory-heavy applications.

  • Kubernetes Ingress

    On a similar note, if your application doesn’t serve a purpose outside the Kubernetes cluster, does it really matter whether or not your cluster is well built? Probably not.

    To give you a concrete example, let’s say we have a classical web app composed of a frontend written in Nodejs and a backend written in Python which uses MySQL database. You deploy two corresponding services on your Kubernetes cluster.

    You make a Dockerfile specifying how to package the frontend software into a container, and similarly you package your backend. Next in your Kubernetes cluster, you will deploy two services each running a set of pods behind it. The web service can talk to the database cluster and vice versa.

  • MongoDB 4.2 materialises with $merge operator and indexing help for unstructured data messes

    Document-oriented database MongoDB is now generally available in version 4.2 which introduces enhancements such as on-demand materialised views and wildcard indexing.

    Wildcard indexing can be useful in scenarios where unstructured, heterogeneous datasets make creating appropriate indexes hard. Admins can use the function to create a filter of sorts that matches fields, arrays, or sub-documents in a collection, and adds the hits to a sparse index.

    [...]

    Speaking of cloud, last year MongoDB decided to step away from using the GNU Affero General Public License for the Community Edition of its database and switched to an altered version. The Server-Side Public License is meant to place a condition – namely, to open source the code used to serve the software from the cloud – on offering MongoDB as a service to clients.

  • Announcing New Course: DevOps and SRE Fundamentals-Implementing Continuous Delivery

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced today that enrollment is now open for the new DevOps and SRE Fundamentals – Implementing Continuous Delivery eLearning course. The course will help an organization be more agile, deliver features rapidly, while at the same time being able to achieve non-functional requirements such as availability, reliability, scalability, security, etc.

    According to Chris Aniszczyk, CTO of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, “The rise of cloud native computing and site reliability engineering are changing the way applications are built, tested, and deployed. The past few years have seen a shift towards having Site Reliability Engineers (SREs) on staff instead of just plain old sysadmins; building familiarity with SRE principles and continuous delivery open source projects are an excellent career investment.”

Fedora: Belated Flock Coverage

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Sausage Factory: Modules – Fake it till you make it

    Last week during Flock to Fedora, we had a discussion about what is needed to build a module outside of the Fedora infrastructure (such as through COPR or OBS). I had some thoughts on this and so I decided to perform a few experiments to see if I could write up a set of instructions for building standalone modules.

    To be clear, the following is not a supported way to build modules, but it does work and covers most of the bases.

  • Fedora: Flock Budapest 2019

    Probably the best from FLOCK was to being able to record several members from our community who kindly accepted to say their names, the places where they come from and the language they speak, and create a small video showing how Diverse and Inclusive Fedora is. Produce a short 2min video in such a chaotic schedule is challenging enough, so after 3 hours of recording, and a rough 2:30hs of editing, I ended up finishing the render of the video just as I was plugin my laptop to the main stage… People usually don’t know how long it takes to do something like that, but I’m just glad everyone seemed to like it and that my laptop didn’t died in the process.

    While working on the video, I was able to have small interviews with several folks from Fedora and got to ask them how comfortable they felt in the community. It was satisfactory to learn from them that the overall care we have take to make minorities feel more included has worked, however, it was a bit sad to learn how hard has been for our contributors to deal with burn out, how tired they are of putting fires out instead doing new projects and mainly getting a general sense of getting stuck into the same routine.

    As our team says, our labor is not only to help with the diversity efforts for making everyone feel comfortable, but we also need to work more to include more effective ways to give people a sense of purpose, provide new challenges that put them on a fun path and give them the recognition they deserve. Fedora has always put a lot of effort into bringing new people to contribute, but I’ve seen that the old contributors are getting on a side because “everything is working” and we need to take care of that. They need the same attention (and I would dare to say that probably more) than new contributors do. At the end, is this amazing group of people who has to mentor new contributors. Feel free to reach me or any member of the Diversity and Inclusion Team if you feel that this words got your attention and you’re willing to share some thoughts. Anonymity is a top priority.

  • Flock to Fedora 2019 Trip Report

    I just flew back from Flock 2019 in Budapest, Hungary, and boy are my arms tired!

    Flock is the Fedora Project’s annual contributor-focused conference. This was my first time attending Flock, and I’ve only attended a handful of previous conference in general, so I wasn’t sure what to expect. It was also my first-ever experience presenting at a conference, and I’m not a fan of long flights in cramped seats—so I arrived for the conference with a bit of anxiety in addition to jet lag. However, sampling the local food and beverage choices helped me adjust.

    I found the four days of events to be filled with interesting sessions that sometimes required difficult choices when deciding what to attend.

    Based on my impression of sessions I attended and discussions in which I participated or observed, here are several topics that seemed to be generating a lot of interest and activity within the Fedora community.

The Great Perhaps Out Now for PC Mac and Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Daedalic Entertainment has launched the original time travel adventure game The Great Perhaps, the debut title from indie developer Caligari Games. Featuring hours of puzzle-based gameplay and atmospheric storytelling in a unique sci-fi universe, this thought-provoking journey will be available for £8.99 / €9.99 / $9.99 on Windows PC, Mac and Linux via Steam, GOG.com and other portals.

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How Mobile Linux Differs from Desktop Linux

Filed under
Linux

Next year might be “the year of desktop Linux” in perpetuity, but mobile operating systems aren’t waiting around. They represent the fastest-growing of the Linux kernel, powering the vast majority of mobile devices. But how can the same kernel work on the desktop and a mobile system? Android doesn’t make much of a desktop operating system after all. The basic rules stay the same, but there are significant differences between mobile and desktop operating systems.

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Announcing EPEL-8.0 Official Release

Filed under
Red Hat

The EPEL Steering Committee is pleased to announce that the initial EPEL-8 is ready for release. We would like to thank everyone in the community for helping us get the initial set of builds out to mirrors and to consumers worldwide. Special thanks go to Patrick Uiterwijk, Jeroen van Meeuwen, Robert Scheck, and many others in the community who helped in the last 6 months to get this release done.

EPEL-8.0 has packages for the x86_64, ppc64le, aarch64, and now the s390x platforms.
What is EPEL?

EPEL stands for Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux and is a subcommunity of the Fedora and CentOS projects aimed at bringing a subset of packages out of Fedora releases ready to be used and installed on various Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). It is not a complete rebuild of Fedora or even of previous EPEL releases. EPEL is also a community and not a product. As such we need community members to help get packages into the repository more than done in Fedora.

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Best desktop environments for Debian

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Under Linux the desktop environment, or graphical environment is independent of the OS (Operating system) in contrast to Windows which, as its name says, incorporated windows as part of its core rather than an optional feature we could add to MS-DOS. I won’t explain deeply that Linux is a kernel rather than an OS and all additional components are complementary including the graphical environment but it is what brings the flexibility on tools choice.
Initially Linux wasn’t developed for domestic use, based on Unix it provided multiuser, multitask and networking functions and the graphical environment wasn’t an initial priority, actually in contrast to Windows servers Linux servers lack of graphical environment because it is unnecessary (but optional, as with any Linux installation).

For domestic or professional use, users need a graphical interface of which you can choose among many options, some of which will be explained in this article.

The disclaimer is no one can affirm what the best desktop environments are since the choice is based on individual needs and tastes, this article lists some desktop environments currently remain unused like Fluxbox because I consider it great, sadly the Linux community disagreed.

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Games: pyLinuxWheel, Dead Cells, Tactics V: "Obsidian Brigade" and Emberlight

Filed under
Gaming
  • pyLinuxWheel and Oversteer, two open source tools for managing Steering Wheels on Linux

    Don't get frustrated by the lack of official support from Logitech for their steering wheels on Linux, reclaim your hardware with these two handy open source tools.

    The first, is pyLinuxWheel (GPL). This supports Driving Force Pro, Driving Force GT, G25, G27 and the G29.

    A few days ago, pyLinuxWheel had a brand new 0.4 release adding support for alternate modes, a Spanish translation and Driving Force Pro Logitech wheel support.

  • Dead Cells feature filled Who's the Boss update out now under a new company

    Some exciting news if you're a big Dead Cells fan like me, as work shall continue on it to expand the game even further under a new dedicated company.

    Motion Twin, the original developer is a "workers co-op" and they said this makes growing their team a little difficult. Since they've been prototyping new games, they also wanted to continue working on Dead Cells. So to do exactly that, the company Evil Empire was created. They're all still in the same office, they have the exact same creative control as before but now they have a dedicated team for Dead Cells. Well, that's one way to do it!

  • Tactics V: "Obsidian Brigade" brings a retro turn-based tactics game to Linux

    Retro-style tactical turn-based strategy game Tactics V: "Obsidian Brigade" has recently released with Linux support.

    Another new interesting release for you recently, developed by From Nothing Game Studios, Tactics V: "Obsidian Brigade" is inspired by console tactical RPGs from the 1990s like Final Fantasy Tactics.

  • Defeat enemies and take their abilities in the roguelike dungeon crawler Emberlight, now available

    Released on Steam yesterday with same-day Linux support, Emberlight is a dungeon crawler with a bit of a difference.

Best Chromebook laptops for school

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Security

You might think a Chromebook is limited because it can only run programs when it's online. That's not true. For example, you can still work with Google Docs when you're offline.

Also, you can now run many Android apps on Chromebooks. And, these days you can run a full Linux desktop on your new Intel-based Chromebook. Indeed, as my tech buddy Mike Elgan points out, today's high-end Chromebook laptops "run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebook laptops can run apps from Android, Linux, and Windows concurrently in the same session."

In addition, as FutureSource points out, when it comes to school work, Chromebook laptops combine "affordable devices, productivity tools via G-Suite, easy integration with third-party platforms/tools, task management/distribution via Google Classroom, and easy device management remains extremely popular with US teachers and IT buyers alike."

One unsung advantage of Chromebook laptops is that, if your dog ate the Chromebook, you wouldn't have lost your work. All you need do is get another one, log on, and you're back in business with all your e-mail, documents, and calendars intact and ready to go. Another sweet deal that comes when you buy a Chromebook is that you can get 100GB of free Google One cloud storage for a year. That's more than enough room for your homework.

And, since it's easy to erase a Chromebook and then reset it to your account, this is safer than using a used Windows laptop.

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Blender 2.80 Performance With Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 vs. AMD EPYC 7742

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

The Blender 2.80 release arrived at the end of July that unfortunately was too late for using that big new release in our launch-day testing of AMD's EPYC 7002 "Rome" processors but as a follow-up here are AMD EPYC 7742 performance benchmarks up against the Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 Cascade Lake as well as the AMD EPYC 7601 2P. Blender 2.80 performance is the focus of this article along with some other renderer benchmarks.

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BFQ (Budget Fair Queuing) I/O Scheduler Improves Linux Systems Responsiveness (Video)

Filed under
Linux

Storage is normally the slowest part of a system, and operating systems such as Linux try to limit I/O access with "tricks" like caching. The I/O.

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Also: RapidDisk version 6.0-1 released

LibreOffice 6.2.6 is ready, all users should update for enhanced security

Filed under
LibO
Security

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.2.6, the sixth minor release of the LibreOffice 6.2 family, targeted at users in production environments. All users of LibreOffice 6.1.x and LibreOffice 6.2.x versions should upgrade immediately for enhanced security, as the software includes both security fixes and some months of back-ported fixes.

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