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Wednesday, 23 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2019 - 10:13am
Story LibreOffice: Continuous Endnotes in Writer and AutoCorrect Dialog Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2019 - 10:07am
Story Excellent Utilities: cheat.sh – community driven cheat sheet Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2019 - 10:03am
Story Games: LinuxGSM, Boxtron, Total War: WARHAMMER II Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2019 - 9:59am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2019 - 9:56am
Story Happy 15th Birthday, Ubuntu! Roy Schestowitz 2 21/10/2019 - 9:47am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2019 - 9:37am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2019 - 9:20am
Story Ubuntu 19.10 Review: Another Retrofitting Release Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2019 - 9:01am
Story CentOS 8.0-1905 Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2019 - 8:59am

Xfce4-Panel Adds Dark Mode Preference

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Landing this week in xfce4-panel was this commit providing a dark mode preference for Xfce4, similar to the growing trend with other desktops/UIs for those wanting a "dark mode" interface.

Enabling this option will request the GTK dark theme variant of capable themes. For a long time now GTK has exposed a property (gtk-application-prefer-dark-theme) for preferring dark themes while now is being tapped by xfce4-panel.

Read more

Cascade Lake vs. Rome With MrBayes, dav1d 0.5, OSPray, SVT-VP9, OIDn + Other Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While swapping around CPUs for the AMD EPYC vs. Intel Xeon Cascade Lake testing of Facebook's RocksDB enterprise workload testing, I also took the opportunity for running some other recently updated test profiles on these EPYC/Xeon parts under test.

These newest results shouldn't be particularly surprising but are primarily just benchmark results for some updated versions of existing tests. With recently a number of updated test profiles on OpenBenchmarking.org against the upstream programs under test, here are simply those latest performance numbers when running on the dual Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 and the AMD EPYC 7601 Naples and EPYC 7502 / 7642 / 7742 Rome processors all in 2P configurations. The setups were the same as from the RocksDB testing with running the newly-minted Ubuntu 19.10.

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conf.kde 2020

Filed under
KDE
  • conf.kde.in Is Coming Back In 2020

    conf.kde.in 2020 will be held in Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology, located in Rohini, Delhi, India. MAIT was established by the Maharaja Agrasen Technical Education Society and promoted by well-known industrialists, businessmen, professionals and philanthropists. The aim of MAIT is to promote quality education in the field of Technology.

    MAIT endeavors to provide industry-relevant education and training through its well-crafted and practical training programs for the students in different semesters of their courses. The campus is composed of 10 blocks with a learning resource center. MAIT has been ranked as the 10th best private engineering institute in India by the Dataquest T-School Survey. MAIT always supports Free and Open Source communities and tech-related activities.

  • conf.kde.in is live!

    At least twice I have been to India. Atil Chitnis closed FOSS.IN in 2008, and I wrote about that only briefly, and in 2011 there was conf.kde.in in Bangalore which I wrote about some more.

    During one of those conferences I fell asleep on the ground in the hall at the KDE booth.

Linux Candy: Ternimal – animated lifeform in the terminal

Filed under
Software

Who loves eye candy? Don’t be shy — you can raise both hands!!

Linux Candy is a new series of articles covering interesting eye candy software. We’re only going to feature open-source software in this series.

I’m not going to harp on about the tired proverb “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy”. But there’s a certain element of truth here. If you spend all day coding neural networks, mastering a new programming language, sit in meetings feeling bored witless, you’ll need some relief at the end of the day. And what better way by making your desktop environment a bit more memorable, zany, and idiosyncratic.

For this article in the Linux Candy series, we’re looking at Ternimal. That’s not a typo. It’s called Ternimal. Think of the name as a hybrid of terminal and animal.

Ternimal simulates a lifeform in the terminal using Unicode block symbols. It’s a script written in Rust. It has no dependencies and consumes very few resources.

Read more

Stable kernels 5.3.7, 4.19.80, 4.14.150, 4.9.197, and 4.4.197

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.3.7

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.3.7 kernel.

    All users of the 5.3 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.3.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.3.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.19.80
  • Linux 4.14.150
  • Linux 4.9.197
  • Linux 4.4.197

KDE: Akademy 2019, Plasma Mobile, List stores in kde.org/applications

Filed under
KDE
  • Akademy 2019 in Beautiful Milan

    We discussed on some marketing strategies, and did some brainstorming on few topics. Learnt how far we have reached on spreading KDE to new users and determined few tasks we would work on for this year.

  • Plasma Mobile: weekly update: part 3

    Thanks to the awesome KDE community, we are happy to present the Plasma Mobile project’s third weekly update.

  • List stores in kde.org/applications

    Announcing a small update for the goal: KDE is All About the Apps. kde.org/applications is now listing the stores where the application is available. For the moment, it’s only listing Linux and the Windows Store, but support for F-Droid and the Play Store is planned. Stay tuned!

Can Linux improve ATM security?

Filed under
Linux
Security

While ATM security is not necessarily "life critical" as with many other industries (think transportation, medical and some industrial applications) there are certainly financial and identity theft risks associated with these devices.

Plenty of info is available on the web regarding various ATM attack vectors, estimated number of annual hacks and the cost to the industry. The question we will ponder here is very specific: Would replacing the Windows operating system in an ATM with a Linux-based one improve security? Most experts believe the answer is yes.

Today's ATM looks much like a personal computer on your desk. It runs the world's most popular desktop operating system — Windows —on the world's most popular hardware: Intel motherboards.

But therein lies part of the problem. Being "most popular" means there are few barriers to keeping the bad guys from simulating the internals of a typical ATM. This fact alone makes Windows more prone to attack than alternatives.

Read more

Meet The Linux Desktop That Will Embarass Windows 10 And macOS in 2020

Filed under
Linux

If you haven’t been paying attention to a little Linux desktop distribution called Deepin, it’s time to put it on your radar. Nevermind that Huawei chose Deepin to ship on their MateBook laptop lineup. Nevermind that Deepin Cloud Sync is a killer, forward-thinking feature that every Linux distro needs to adopt. Nevermind that its elegant slide-out control center resembles something sexy and sensible straight out of the future. But looking toward 2020, Deepin is poised to be absolutely stunning.

This is without question the most beautiful environment I’ve ever laid eyes on. I’ve gone from admiring it as an elevated Desktop Linux distribution to downright salivating over it.

Read more

Qt Creator 4.11 Beta released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.11 Beta!

We added experimental support for Qt for WebAssembly and Qt for MCUs.

We improved the general handling of configuring, building and running projects in so many smaller ways that I fail to choose anything for being highlighted here.

If you use CMake 3.14 or later we now use CMake's file-base API for configuring and parsing projects. Which behaves much more reliably than the previous server-mode, especially if you also use CMake from a terminal or other applications.

Read more

Games: Crusader Kings II, Woven, Team Fortress 2, X4: Foundations and Wildermyth

Filed under
Gaming
  • Crusader Kings II goes free to play, Paradox games on sale and possibly Crusader Kings III coming

    It's Friday morning, I've got my coffee ready so let's go over what's going on what Paradox Interactive. They've got a lot going on right now!

    Firstly, it seems Crusader Kings II has gone fully free to play. This doesn't appear to be time limited either, the Steam store page properly states it's "Free To Play" and on Twitter, the Crusader Kings official account said "This is not a joke - Crusader Kings 2 is free to play!".

    Considering it has a rather large amount of DLC, it's seven years old and it's been given out temporarily free for keeps before, it seems like a good idea to set the base game free for everyone now. Looks like all the DLC is also 50% off.

  • With a fabric world, Woven looks like a unique adventure coming to Linux next month

    Alterego Games and StickyLock Studios have announced that their adventure game Woven is releasing on November 15. Woven certainly looks pleasant, with a world that looks like someone stitched it together and your character is a stuffed animal.

    Woven is a laid-back adventure and exploration game, where you roam a world made of fabric. They said all the stuffed animals once lived in peace and all appears well at first glance, but not everything is as it seems. As you progress through Woven as the clumsy character Stuffy you customize them with different animal shapes to gain new abilities, solve puzzles and attempt to find out why the world is being invaded by metal machines.

  • The Scream Fortress XI event has launched for Team Fortress 2

    While perhaps not as big as previous events, it's still a good time to boot up Team Fortress 2 again and have a blast. Dust off your crazy mask, pick a silly weapon skin and dive in.

  • X4: Foundations update 2.60 is out, X4: Split Vendetta and the big 3.0 update both delayed

    A couple of bits of news from Egosoft to share for their massive space sci-fi sandbox X4: Foundations.

  • Fantasty tactical RPG Wildermyth blends a mix of hand-painted 2D and 3D art & arrives on Steam soon

    With character art during the turn-based battles that look like paper cutouts in a 3D environment, Wildermyth certainly has a strange and lovely charm to it.

    Currently available on itch.io were users have been testing it for some time, Worldwalker Games have now announced that their character-driven tactical RPG will enter Early Access on Steam on November 13. In Wildermyth, your party will be tasked with defending the lands from various threads, switching between the turn-based combat and making decisions on the over-world map. It has choice-based comic-styled events, which can end up changing your heroes appearance, personalities, relationships, and abilities.

Learn Hyperledger Blockchain Tech from the Linux Foundation

Filed under
News

Linux Foundation, the official organization behind Linux, is running a limited time deal on its Hyperledger training and certification courses. This will help in boosting your career as blockchain skills are in high demand.
Read more

How I built and maintain Cantata, an open source music player

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

This is the third in a series of conversations with developers who build and maintain open source music players. Craig Drummond is the developer and maintainer of Cantata, an open source music player that acts as a frontend (client) to the Music Player Daemon (MPD) music server. I have two small headless computers at home configured as music servers—one connected to our stereo in our living room, one in my upstairs office. I first ran into Cantata while I was looking for a way to control these servers, and wow, it is one impressive piece of work.

I was interested in learning more about Cantata, so I was grateful when Craig agreed to do this interview (which has been lightly edited for length and clarity). Without further ado, let’s chat with Craig.

Read more

Security: Linux, Docker and Guix

Filed under
Security
  • Unpatched Linux bug may open devices to serious attacks over Wi-Fi

    The flaw is located in the RTLWIFI driver, which is used to support Realtek Wi-Fi chips in Linux devices. The vulnerability triggers a buffer overflow in the Linux kernel when a machine with a Realtek Wi-Fi chip is within radio range of a malicious device. At a minimum, exploits would cause an operating-system crash and could possibly allow a hacker to gain complete control of the computer. The flaw dates back to version 3.10.1 of the Linux kernel released in 2013.

  • Docker Attack Worm Mines for Monero
  • Insecure permissions on profile directory (CVE-2019-18192)

    We have become aware of a security issue for Guix on multi-user systems that we have just fixed (CVE-2019-18192). Anyone running Guix on a multi-user system is encouraged to upgrade guix-daemon—see below for instructions.

    Context

    The default user profile, ~/.guix-profile, points to /var/guix/profiles/per-user/$USER. Until now, /var/guix/profiles/per-user was world-writable, allowing the guix command to create the $USER sub-directory.

    On a multi-user system, this allowed a malicious user to create and populate that $USER sub-directory for another user that had not yet logged in. Since /var/…/$USER is in $PATH, the target user could end up running attacker-provided code. See the bug report for more information.

    This issue was initially reported by Michael Orlitzky for Nix (CVE-2019-17365).

In 2019, multiple open source companies changed course—is it the right move?

Filed under
OSS

Free and open source software enables the world as we know it in 2019. From Web servers to kiosks to the big data algorithms mining your Facebook feed, nearly every computer system you interact with runs, at least in part, on free software. And in the larger tech industry, free software has given rise to a galaxy of startups and enabled the largest software acquisition in the history of the world.

Free software is a gift, a gift that made the world as we know it possible. And from the start, it seemed like an astounding gift to give. So astounding in fact that it initially made businesses unaccustomed to this kind of generosity uncomfortable. These companies weren't unwilling to use free software, it was simply too radical and by extension too political. It had to be renamed: "open source."

Once that happened, open source software took over the world.

Recently, though, there's been a disturbance in the open source force. Within the last year, companies like Redis Labs, MongoDB, and Confluent all changed their software licenses, moving away from open source licenses to more restrictive terms that limit what can be done with the software, making it no longer open source software.

Read more

Also: Network Time Foundation Joins Open Source Initiative

Red Hat: OpenShift, RHEL, Dependency Analytics, vDPA and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Expands the Kubernetes Developer Experience with Newest Version of Red Hat OpenShift 4

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced Red Hat OpenShift 4.2, the latest version of Red Hat’s trusted enterprise Kubernetes platform designed to deliver a more powerful developer experience. Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 extends Red Hat’s commitment to simplifying and automating enterprise-grade services across the hybrid cloud while empowering developers to innovate and enhance business value through cloud-native applications.

  • RHEL and Insights combo illuminates threats and spotlights performance for Red Hat systems

    When Red Hat Inc. officially rolled out its Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, or RHEL 8, operating system in May, the open-source software company also included Red Hat Insights with every subscription for the new release. Based on data supplied by one of the company’s top executives, that has proven to be a wise decision.

    Insights is a software as a service product that works from a rules-based engine to offer continuous connected analysis of registered Red Hat-based systems.

    “We’ve seen an 87% increase since May in the number of systems that are linked in,” said Stefanie Chiras (pictured), vice president and general manager of the RHEL Business Unit at Red Hat. “We’re seeing a 33% increase in coverage of rules-based and a 152% increase in customers who are using it. That creates a community of people using and getting value from it, but also giving value back because the more data we have the better the rules get.”

  • What’s new in Red Hat Dependency Analytics

    We are excited to announce a new release of Red Hat Dependency Analytics, a solution that enables developers to create better applications by evaluating and adding high-quality open source components, directly from their IDE.

    Red Hat Dependency Analytics helps your development team avoid security and licensing issues when building your applications. It plugs into the developer’s IDE, automatically analyzes your software composition, and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing problems that your team may be missing.

    Without further ado, let’s jump into the new capabilities offered in this release. This release includes a new version of the IDE plugin and the server-side analysis service hosted by Red Hat.

  • Breaking cloud native network performance barriers

    Up until now we have covered virtio-networking and its usage in VMs. We started with the original vhost-net/virtio-net architecture, moved on to the vhost-user/virito-pmd architecture and continued to vDPA (vHost Data Path Acceleration) where the virtio ring layout was pushed all the way into the NIC providing wiresspeed/wirelatency to VMs.

    We now turn our attention to using vDPA for providing wirespeed/wirelatency L2 interfaces to containers leveraging kubernetes to orchestrate the overall solution. We will demonstrate how Containerized Network Functions (CNFs) can be accelerated using a combination of vDPA interfaces and DPDK libraries. The vDPA interfaces are added as a secondary interface to containers using the Multus CNI plugin.

    This post is a high level solution overview describing the main building blocks and how they fit together. We assume that the reader has an overall understanding of Kubernetes, the Container Network Interface (CNI) and NFV terminology such as VNFs and CNFs.

  • Top 5 stress reliefs for sysadmins

Purism shows off more pictures of Librem 5 Phone and PureOS UI

Filed under
Gadgets

As the first batch of the Librem 5 phones starts reaching its respectful owners, we can now have a better look at the product from its pictures taken by the customers.

Before we check them out, let’s get to know a bit more about these phones. The Librem 5 smartphones are powered by PureOS, which is a Linux-based mobile operating system. The brains behind this product, namely Purism, have made it their top priority to offer such phones that provide security, privacy, and freedom to the customers. Accordingly, this product has been made for people who want to have complete control over their phones. You should check out this article if you want to know more about the Librem 5 smartphones.

Now coming back to the news, people who have ordered this phone are in for a treat as the Librem 5 comes with a black anodized aluminum case. Not only it’s stylish, but it also maintains high radio reception quality – thanks to its non-metal backing. It accompanies easier-to-slide, flush hardware kill switches.

Read more

Also: Nathan Wolf: New Life to Rock Candy Gamepad for PS3 | Another Repair

Graphics Stack: PTS, Libinput and NVIDIA 440.26 Beta Linux Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.2 Milestone 1 Released With Updates For macOS Benchmarking

    The first development snapshot of Phoronix Test Suite 9.2-Hurdal is now available ahead of the stable release later this quarter.

    It's been just one month since the big Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 release with a new result viewer, graphing improvements, and other result viewing enhancements and lower-level improvements. With Phoronix Test Suite 9.2 as the Q4'2019 release will be more evolutionary improvements.

  • libinput and tablet pad keys

    Upcoming in libinput 1.15 is a small feature to support Wacom tablets a tiny bit better. If you look at the higher-end devices in Wacom's range, e.g. the Cintiq 27QHD you'll notice that at the top right of the device are three hardware-buttons with icons. Those buttons are intended to open the config panel, the on-screen display or the virtual keyboard. They've been around for a few years and supported in the kernel for a few releases. But in userspace, they events from those keys were ignored, casted out in the wild before eventually running out of electrons and succumbing to misery. Well, that's all changing now with a new interface being added to libinput to forward those events.

    Step back a second and let's look at the tablet interfaces. We have one for tablet tools (styli) and one for tablet pads. In the latter, we have events for rings, strips and buttons. The latter are simply numerically ordered, so button 1 is simply button 1 with no special meaning. Anything more specific needs to be handled by the compositor/client side which is responsible for assigning e.g. keyboard shortcuts to those buttons.

  • libinput and button scrolling locks

    For a few years now, libinput has provided button scrolling. Holding a designated button down and moving the device up/down or left/right creates the matching scroll events. We enable this behaviour by default on some devices (e.g. trackpoints) but it's available on mice and some other devices. Users can change the button that triggers it, e.g. assign it to the right button. There are of course a couple of special corner cases to make sure you can still click that button normally but as I said, all this has been available for quite some time now.

  • NVIDIA have released the big new Linux Beta driver 440.26 today

    Today NVIDIA released the 440.26 Beta driver for Linux with a number of new features, enhancements and a few interesting bug fixes.

  • NVIDIA 440.26 Beta Linux Driver Brings HDMI 2.1 VRR, VP9 VDPAU Decode + Much More

    NVIDIA today introduced their first beta driver in the 440 Linux branch and it's quite an exciting release!

    The NVIDIA 440.26 Linux beta driver is out this morning and it's bringing with it many new/improved features. There is now VP9 video decoding for VDPAU, HDMI 2.1 VRR for G-SYNC Compatible, and more.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

MX Linux 19 'Patito Feo' is here!

In the classic story The Ugly Duckling by Hans Christian Andersen, a bird is bullied and tormented by a bunch of mean ducks -- simply because his appearance is different, and he is perceived as ugly. Spoiler alert: he grows up to be a beautiful swan and has the last laugh. Take that, mean ducks! In many ways, Linux users have been like that bullied bird -- made fun of for being different, but as time marches on, it is clear that they are the true swans of the computing world. And so, how appropriate that MX Linux 19, which is released today, is code-named "Patito Feo," which is Spanish for ugly duckling. Yes, following some beta releases, the increasingly popular Debian 10 Buster-based distribution is finally here. The operating system features kernel 4.19 and uses the lightweight Xfce 4.14 desktop environment. It even features a patched sudo, so you don't need to worry about that nasty security vulnerability that had some folks worried. Of course, there is a bunch of great software installed, such as Firefox 69, Thunderbird 60.9, LibreOffice 6.1.5, VLC 3.0.8, GIMP 2.10.12, and more! Read more

Red Hat is positioning itself as the digital transformation partner of the enterprise

Although the concept of digital transformation isn't new, the way in which companies are leveraging technology to make changes to their day-to-day business is constantly evolving, according to Red Hat senior vice president of cloud platforms Ashesh Badani. Using packaging and logistics giant UPS as his example, Badani said the organisation has been working with Red Hat on how it can make its monolithic architecture more modern, in a way that can support them into the future, but also allow for faster innovation. "Essentially take processing to the edge to improve the way they schedule packages, deliver them, increase efficiency routes," he told Red Hat Forum in Melbourne last week. "Be able to do that quickly, because every customer wants personalisation, and they want to be able to make sure that they can see where their packages are." Badani said UPS is now taking advantage of micro services-based technologies, which he said allows for the analytics to take place at the edge, useful in places such as distribution centres that are closest to the actual customers. Read more

Android Leftovers