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Mozilla: Performance, Privacy Aspects and Gecko

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox 71 Linux Performance Isn't Looking All That Great

    With each new release of Firefox we set out to see how the performance is looking on the Linux desktop. One discovery we've made is that when using Intel's Clear Linux the Firefox performance is a lot more competitive to Google Chrome than we traditionally see on Ubuntu Linux. But with Firefox 71 we're seeing the performance trending lower compared to Firefox 69 and 70.

    Here are some benchmarks of Firefox 69 / 70 / 71 builds using the official Mozilla binaries along with Chrome 78. All of the benchmarks freshly done from the same system that this time around was running Clear Linux.

  • Mozilla locks nosy Avast, AVG extensions out of Firefox store amid row over web privacy

    The Firefox extensions built by Avast have been pulled from the open-source browser's online add-on store over privacy fears.

    Adblock Plus founder Wladimir Palant confirmed this week Mozilla has taken down the Avast Online Security and Avast-owned AVG Online Security extensions he reported to the browser maker, claiming the code was snooping on users' web surfing.

    The problem, as Palant has been documenting on his blog for some time, is that the extensions – which offer to do things like prevent malware infections and phishing – may go well beyond their needed level of access to user information to do their advertised functions.

    According to Palant, the Avast extensions, when installed in your browser, track the URL and title of every webpage you visit, and how you got to that page, along with a per-user identifier and details about your operating system and browser version, plus other metadata, and then transmit all that info back to Avast's backend servers. The user identifier is not always sent, according to Palant: it may not be disclosed if you have Avast Antivirus installed.

    The rub seems to be that Avast says it needs this personal data to detect dodgy and fraudulent websites, while Palant argues the company goes too far and wanders into spyware territory. While Avast's explanation is plausible, there are much better and safer ways to check visited pages for nastiness, typically involving cryptographic hashes of URLs, than firing off all visited web addresses to an Avast server, we note.

  • Zibi Braniecki: Multilingual Gecko – 2017-2018 – Rearchitecture

    Between 2017 and 2018 we refactored a major component of the Gecko Platform – the intl/locale module. The main motivator was the vision of Multilingual Gecko which I documented in a blog post.

    Firefox 65 brought the first major user-facing change that results from that refactor in form of Locale Selection. It’s a good time to look back at the scale of changes. This post is about the refactor of the whole module which enabled many of the changes that we were able to land in 2019 to Firefox.

  • How to stop third party tracking on health sites

    This practice isn’t always unlawful, but it is creepy. Tracking by third parties happens across a wide swath of websites, but it is especially unsettling for health-related websites.

    [...]

    If you’re fed up with the level of third party tracking happening on the web, take control of your personal data with Firefox with Enhanced Tracking Protection.

    The Firefox privacy protections dashboard reveals who’s trying to track you behind the scenes and helps you stop them. To see who’s trying to track you on individual webpages, click on the shield icon to the left of the Firefox address bar. (If you don’t see the shield, here’s how to update your Firefox.)

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Cooking With Linux and FLOSS Weekly on XWiki

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 2019-12-04 | Linux Headlines

    Canonical announces Ubuntu Pro, Netflix open sources Metaflow, and Plex has a new streaming service.

  • New "Cooking With Linux" Intro, Built Using Kdenlive

    A couple of days ago, as I was editing a new "Cooking With Linux" video, I realized that the CWL intro I had been using for so long, one I paid some poor soul on Fiverr to make for me, had a Google Plus link as part of the video. As you might know, Google Plus hasn't been around for a while now, so I put aside my mostly completed video (Audacity for Editing Podcasts) and set about creating my own CWL intro. This is what I came up with. Feel free to comment, to tell me it sucks, to appreciate it, or whatever.

  • FLOSS Weekly 558: XWiki

    XWiki is a free wiki software platform written in Java with a design emphasis on extensibility. It includes WYSIWYG editing, OpenDocument based document import/export, semantic annotations and tagging, and advanced permissions management.

Latest on Mesa Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 19.3.0-rc6
    Hi list,
    
    Available today is mesa 19.3.0-rc6. Things are starting to slow down, and there
    are now only two open issues in the 19.3 milestone, so I'm hopeful that next
    week will bring 19.3.0 final, and not an rc7, but I can always be surprised.
    
    By far radv + aco dominate the list of changes, but there's also changes to anv,
    panfrost, core gallium, fixes for OpenBSD, iris, and nir.
    
    Dylan
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (2):
          radv: Unify max_descriptor_set_size.
          radv: Fix timeline semaphore refcounting.
    
    Boris Brezillon (2):
          gallium: Fix the ->set_damage_region() implementation
          panfrost: Make sure we reset the damage region of RTs at flush time
    
    Christian Gmeiner (1):
          etnaviv: remove dead code
    
    Daniel Schürmann (2):
          aco: don't split live-ranges of linear VGPRs
          aco: fix a couple of value numbering issues
    
    Dylan Baker (1):
          VERSION: bump version for 19.3-rc6
    
    Jason Ekstrand (1):
          anv: Set up SBE_SWIZ properly for gl_Viewport
    
    Jonathan Gray (2):
          winsys/amdgpu: avoid double simple_mtx_unlock()
          i965: update Makefile.sources for perf changes
    
    Jordan Justen (1):
          iris: Allow max dynamic pool size of 2GB for gen12
    
    Kenneth Graunke (2):
          driconf, glsl: Add a vs_position_always_invariant option
          drirc: Set vs_position_always_invariant for Shadow of Mordor on Intel
    
    Rhys Perry (5):
          aco: propagate p_wqm on an image_sample's coordinate p_create_vector
          aco: fix i2i64
          aco: add v_nop inbetween exec write and VMEM/DS/FLAT
          radv: set writes_memory for global memory stores/atomics
          nir/lower_io_to_vector: don't create arrays when not needed
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (2):
          radv: fix enabling sample shading with SampleID/SamplePosition
          radv/gfx10: fix implementation of exclusive scans
    
    
    git tag: mesa-19.3.0-rc6
    
  • Mesa 19.3 Might Release Next Week But For Now There's RC6 With Several ACO+RADV Fixes

    Mesa 19.3 continues running behind schedule but stands chances for releasing next week if the lingering blocker bugs are closed.

    Mesa 19.3-RC6 was released today as the newest weekly release candidate and it brought with it several random RADV fixes, a number of ACO compiler back-end fixes that also benefit RADV, a few Gallium3D fixes, an Intel Iris Gen12 fix, and a workaround for Shadow of Mordor on Intel graphics.

  • Mesa Devs Discuss Potentially Dropping Non-Gallium Drivers Or Forking Code For Gallium

    Longtime open-source AMD graphics driver developer Marek Olšák has kicked off a discussion over the possibility in the not too distant future of either dropping non-Gallium3D drivers from Mesa (and moving them off to a maintenance branch or the like) or forking some of Mesa's existing code to allow it to be better optimized for Gallium3D use-cases. Due to raised concerns, other possibilities are also being expressed like simply moving ahead with optimizing the Mesa code-base for Gallium3D at a cost of potentially hitting dead code more often with the classic drivers.

    As it stands now, the only relevant non-Gallium3D driver in the Mesa code-base is Intel i965. While that's currently the default Intel driver, for Broadwell "Gen8" graphics and newer they will be transitioning to their new Iris Gallium3D driver by default expected to happen for Mesa 20.0. The i965 driver will still be around for Haswell and older generations to come -- either within mainline Mesa or some maintenance branch. As part of this new Mesa discussion was a hypothetical comment about creating a new Intel Gallium3D driver for Haswell and older, but that's extremely unlikely to happen and was just brought up as a matter of being thorough. There aren't the extra resources available to create an Intel Gallium3D driver for aging Haswell and older hardware plus that it would likely take around a year to develop and even longer before reaching performance parity to i965.

  • Remove classic drivers or fork src/mesa for gallium?
    Hi,
    
    Here are 2 proposals to simplify and better optimize the GL->Gallium
    translation.
    
    1) Move classic drivers to a fork of Mesa, and remove them from master.
    Classic drivers won't share any code with master. glvnd will load them, but
    glvnd is not ready for this yet.
    
    2) Keep classic drivers. Fork src/mesa for Gallium. I think only mesa/main,
    mesa/vbo, mesa/program, and drivers/dri/common need to be forked and
    mesa/state_tracker moved. src/gallium/state-trackers/gl/ can be the target
    location.
    
    Option 2 is more acceptable to people who want to keep classic drivers in
    the tree and it can be done right now.
    
    Opinions?
    
    Thanks,
    Marek
    

Games: Stadia, Rocket League, Dead Cells, Lutris on Fedora

Filed under
Gaming
  • Stadia Live Streaming with Farming Simulator 19

    No, I don't know anything about this game and yes, it's my first time playing.

  • The big Rocket League update that kicked out loot boxes is now live

    Psyonix have given loot boxes the boot in the latest update to Rocket League, with a new Blueprint and Item Shop system. There's a whole lot more to it too.

    Instead of loot boxes, they now have a Blueprint system where you know what the item is and so there's no gambling involved. These Blueprints can drop after an online match.

  • Motion Twin announce The Bad Seed expansion for Dead Cells

    The first paid DLC is on the way for Dead Cells, with Motion Twin hoping The Bad Seed will help their spin-off company Evil Empire continue pushing out further free content updates.

    Sounds like they've been seriously busy (announcement here). With The Bad Seed DLC releasing in "Q1" next year, they've said it will be around $5 and since they've been doing quite meaty free updates for a while, it seems quite reasonable. If things go well with this DLC, they said they're aiming for at least another two years of free content updates for everyone to the base game.

  • Fedora 31 : Lutris the Open Source gaming platform for Linux.

    Lutris is an Open Source gaming platform for Linux. It installs and launches games so you can start playing without the hassle of setting up your games. Get your games from GOG, Steam, Battle.net, Origin, Uplay and many other sources running on any Linux powered gaming machine.

Dell XPS 13 7390 Review: The Best Laptop For Desktop Linux Users

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Gone are the days when we had to do a lot of research and read a lot of reviews to find a machine that would work with the least amount of trouble with the desktop Linux distribution of choice. Today, almost every machine out there can run Linux. The kernel community has done an incredible job with device driver support to make everything work out of the box.

Still, there are machines that can run Linux, and then there are machines that run Linux. Dell machines fall in the latter category. Five years ago, Barton George started a program within Dell to bring desktop Linux to consumer grade, high-end Dell systems. What started as one machine is now an entire line of high-end laptops and desktops.

Among these machines, XPS 13 is my favorite. While I need a really powerful desktop to handle my 4K UHD, multicam video production, I also need an ultra-portable laptop that I can bring with me anywhere without having to worry about a bulky backpack and charger. XPS 13 was also my very first laptop, which lasted me more than 7 years. So, yes, there is that nostalgic factor, too.

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Disney+ Now Works on Linux, No Workarounds Required

Filed under
Linux

Disney launched its new video streaming service in the USA and Canada last month to much hype and attention (it scores 10 million subscribers in the first day alone).

But many Linux users in those countries who’d been hoping to tune in to watch shows like The Mandalorian and High School Musical: The Musical: The Series were left disappointed.

For although rival streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime work “out of the box” on Linux in web browsers like Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox, Disney+ didn’t.

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NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those looking to spend less than $200 USD on a graphics card, the recently launched NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER offers great value starting at $159 USD and working well with the NVIDIA Linux driver for providing decent 1080p Linux gaming performance as well as OpenCL / CUDA support. Here are benchmarks of the GTX 1650 SUPER alongside a total of 18 lower-end/mid-range AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards on Ubuntu Linux.

The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER features 1280 CUDA cores, a reference 1530MHz base clock, 1725MHz boost clock, 4GB of GDDR6 video memory on a 128-bit bus, and other common NVIDIA Turing GPU features sans this being a GTX part and not RTX thus no RT cores.

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Rock Pi N10 SBC delivers AI-enhanced RK3399Pro starting at $99

Filed under
Android
Debian

Radxa’s “Rock Pi N10” SBC runs Debian or Android 8.1 on an RK3399Pro for $99 (4GB RAM/16GB eMMC), $129 (6GB/32GB), or $169 (8GB/64GB), with the RAM split between the 6x CPU cores and the up to 3-TOPS NPU. The SBC is built around a Vamrs VMARC RK3399Pro SoM.

Radxa has gone to Seeed to launch an open-spec, community-backed Rock Pi N10 SBC with an AI-enabled Rockchip RK3399Pro SoC delivered via Vamrs’ VMARC RK3399Pro SoM compute module. While the RK3399Pro is essentially a hexa-core RK3399 that adds an up to 3-TOPS NPU, the Rock Pi N10 is not just a Rock Pi 4 with an updated Pro SoC. Unlike that RK3399-based Raspberry Pi pseudo-clone, the Rock Pi N10 is a sandwich-style 100 x 100mm board. Despite the larger size, the feature set is very similar.

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Attacks, Openwashing, and Assimilation Tactics

Filed under
Misc

         

  • How a Patent on Sorting Photos Got Used to Sue a Free Software Group

           

             

    Taking and sharing pictures with wireless devices has become a common practice. It’s hardly a recent development: the distinction between computers and cameras has shrunk, especially since 2007 when smartphone cameras became standard. Even though devices that can take and share photos wirelessly have become ubiquitous over a period spanning more than a decade, the Patent Office granted a patent on an “image-capturing device” in 2018.

             

    A patent on something so commonplace might be comical, but unfortunately, U.S. Patent No. 9,936,086 is already doing damage to software innovation. It’s creating litigation costs for real developers. The creator of this patent is Rothschild Patent Imaging LLC, or RPI, a company linked to a network of notorious patent trolls connected to inventor Leigh Rothschild. We've written about two of them before: Rothschild Connected Devices Innovations, and Rothschild Broadcast Distribution Systems. Now, RPI has used the ’086 patent to sue the Gnome Foundation, a non-profit that makes free software.

  • News organizations are engaging more proactively in open-source journalism to rebuild trust in news media

    As news media skepticism grows worldwide and digital tools become increasingly robust and available, reporters and news organizations are engaging more proactively in open-source journalism — a practice in which reporters investigate and construct stories based on publicly available data, including via social media, per The New York Times.

    As digital resources and social media have given all people a public, open platform to communicate, user-generated content has become primary source material and created a trail for open-source journalists to investigate. And by performing investigative research in this way, reporters can more easily connect directly to visual evidence on the web, rather than refer to private sources.

  • It's Hipp to be square: What happened when SQLite creator met GitHub

    There are two notable points in Hipp's report. For one, he feels that Git could be improved. He considers the Git Rebase command, which alters or removes the history of a commit, to be harmful. Since Git's own documentation of Rebase is full of warnings about misuse, this is not surprising, though there are circumstances where it can be useful. Hipp is also keen to see a means of revising the comments on previous check-ins because of the importance of documentation.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • tee is broken?

    Just found a highly surprising behavior in a core tool I've used for decades, so clearly I'm making a note here.

    [...]

    Answer time! After a tee, a single writer parent feeds two reader children. If a child exits before reading all the data, then when the parent tries to feed that dead child, the parent will get a SIGPIPE. And apparently the default behavior of tee in GNU coreutils (and in the zsh multios redirection) is to give up and to stop feeding all the children at that point. So the second child (wc -l in the examples) ends up with incomplete input. No errors are thrown anywhere, and there's no indication at all that any data was truncated. Lots of the data is just silently missing.

  • 4 ways to control the flow of your awk script

    There are many ways to control the flow of an awk script, including loops, switch statements and the break, continue, and next commands.

  • Qt 5.14.0 RC released

    Qt 5.14.0 RC is released today. As usual you can get it by using online installer (for new installations) or by using maintenance tool (existing online installation). And in addition there is also offline installers in qt account or download.qt.io for users who can't use online ones. Delta to beta3 as an attachment.

    Target is to release Qt 5.14.0 12th December so please test RC now & report all new release blockers immediately. Also make sure those are visible in release blocker list (https://bugreports.qt.io/issues/?filter=21539). But remember that Qt 5.14.1 is also coming soon so we can fix most of findings there and fix only real blockers in '5.14.0'.

  • Qt 5.14 On Track For Releasing Next Week With New Scenegraph Renderer, Better HiDPI

    While missing the original release target of the end of November, The Qt Company is buttoning up Qt 5.14 for debut next week. Today, however, marks the release candidate availability for those wanting to test out this forthcoming Qt5 release prior to more of the development efforts shifting to Qt 6.0.

  • Rust 2020

    Technically speaking, it’s past the deadline for #rust2020 posts, but I’m running late this year, and I’m going to post something anyway. In this post, I am focusing on what I see as the “largest scale” issues, and not on technical initiatives. If I have time, I will try to post a follow-up talking about some of the key technical initiatives that I think we should focus on as well.

  • Automatically downloading nursery photos from ParentZone using Selenium

    My son goes to a nursery part-time, and the nursery uses a system called ParentZone from Connect Childcare to send information between us (his parents) and nursery. Primarily, this is used to send us updates on the boring details of the day (what he’s had to eat, nappy changes and so on), and to send ‘observations’ which include photographs of what he’s been doing at nursery. 

  • Auto-generating API specifications as OpenAPI, WSDL and Sphinx

    Let's consider the services below - they represent a subset of a hypothetical API of a telecommunication company. In this case, they are to do with pre-paid cards. Deploy them on your servers in a module called api.py.

    Note that their implementation is omitted, we only deal with their I/O, as it is expressed using SimpleIO.

    What we would like to have, and what we will achieve here, is a website with static HTML describing the services in terms of a formal API specification.

  • GUI Automation using Pyautogui, Python

    PYAUTOGUI is an automation module provided by Python for controlling keyboard and mouse functions via program. This module has almost all the functions which can be performed by keyboard and mouse. We can use these functions to automate mouse and keyboard actions.

  • Beautiful Soup: Build a Web Scraper With Python

    The incredible amount of data on the Internet is a rich resource for any field of research or personal interest. To effectively harvest that data, you’ll need to become skilled at web scraping. The Python libraries requests and Beautiful Soup are powerful tools for the job. If you like to learn with hands-on examples and you have a basic understanding of Python and HTML, then this tutorial is for you.

  • Tensorflow 2.0: Solving Classification and Regression Problems

    After much hype, Google finally released TensorFlow 2.0 which is the latest version of Google's flagship deep learning platform. A lot of long-awaited features have been introduced in TensorFlow 2.0. This article very briefly covers how you can develop simple classification and regression models using TensorFlow 2.0.

  • Two New Typosquatting Libraries Found on PyPI

    Two new malicious packages were found on the Python Packaging Index (PyPI) that were designed to steal GPG and SSH keys according to ZDNet. The packages were named python3-dateutil and jeIlyfish where the first “L” is actually an I. These two libraries mimicked the dateutil and jellyfish packages respectively.

  • Framework Patterns

    A software framework is code that calls your (application) code. That's how we distinguish a framework from a library. Libraries have aspects of frameworks so there is a gray area.

    My friend Christian Theune puts it like this: a framework is a text where you fill in the blanks. The framework defines the grammar, you bring some of the words. The words are the code you bring into it.

    If you as a developer use a framework, you need to tell it about your code. You need to tell the framework what to call, when. Let's call this configuring the framework.

    There are many ways to configure a framework. Each approach has its own trade-offs. I will describe some of these framework configuration patterns here, with brief examples and mention of some of the trade-offs. Many frameworks use more than a single pattern. I don't claim this list is exhaustive -- there are more patterns.

    The patterns I describe are generally language agnostic, though some depend on specific language features. Some of these patterns make more sense in object oriented languages. Some are easier to accomplish in one language compared to another. Some languages have rich run-time introspection abilities, and that make certain patterns a lot easier to implement. A language with a powerful macro facility will make other patterns easier to implement.

    Where I give example code, I will use Python. I give some abstract code examples, and try to supply a few real-world examples as well. The examples show the framework from the perspective of the application developer.

  • Django 3 taps Python async to speed web apps

    Django 3.0, the newest version of the Python framework that allows fast creation of database-backed websites and web services, now supports Python async, one of the most powerful new features in Python to make websites and network services faster.

    Async allows Python programs, especially networking apps, to run more efficiently, but existing applications must be rewritten to use it. Django 3 will only work with Python 3.6 and later versions, the better to work with Python’s async programming features. 

    A key way Django provides support for async is via ASGI, a protocol that serves as a standard interface between asynchronous Python applications and async-capable web servers. Previously, Django only supported WSGI, which only supported synchronous web applications. Django 3 will only allow async features to run in an app if it’s deployed as ASGI.

  •                    

  • CSS: An Art, a Science, a Nightmare (Overview of CSS Concepts)

                         

                           

    Some people think CSS is really hard and it's too much of a hassle to learn. Some people think that since it's not a programming language (or is it?), it's so easy that you don't even have to bother learning it. Ultimately, there's a lot to CSS, but it doesn't have to be overwhelming. If you learn a few key concepts, you should feel confident looking at or thinking of any design and turning it into reality.

                           

    I'm going to go over some of the parts of CSS that are important on a daily basis, and give some of tips and tricks I've come to learn over the years.

  •                    

Talks and Events: Linux Vendor Firmware Service at OSFC, GNOME.Asia Summit 2019 and Laura Czajkowski on Booths

Filed under
OSS
  • Richard Hughes: OSFC 2019 – Introducing the Linux Vendor Firmware Service

    A few months ago I gave a talk at OSFC.io titled Introducing the Linux Vendor Firmware Service.

  • GNOME.Asia Summit 2019

    Back from Gresik more than one month, here is my late report for GNOME.Asia Summit 2019.

    This year, GNOME.Asia Summit 2019 was held in Universitas Muhammadiyah Gresik. It’s my seventh GNOME.Asia Summit that I attend.

  • Laura Czajkowski: The Do’s and Don’ts of Booth Duty

    Allow enough time: We are all busy but we must allow enough time to do each event properly. For example, arrive the evening before rather than the morning of the conference. Things often go wrong; let’s give ourselves enough time to fix a delayed flight or lost bag of cables.

    Be punctual!Show up way before the attendees. Remember, you’re on duty as a representative of your organisation, so you should be on the show floor 30 mins before it opens for a final briefing and to find out where everything is.

    Demos: The demo Gods can be cruel. Check your display each morning to make sure it (still) works.

    Dress code: We live in the world of Insta we are professionals., Figure out if your organisation has a preferred way dress code for an event, e.g. if there is a specific t-shirt that needs to be worn for a launch. Trust me when I say this, wear comfortable shoes, I’d go as far as to say bring alternative shoes for different days. Standing is difficult, make it easier on your little twinkle toes!

    Be prepared: If you are in charge of a demo, make sure the laptop is set up and ready the day before, turning up to the event to get it setup or installed is not a good use of your time. Make sure the laptop is charged the night before. Bring your charger with you, not everyone has the same connector and an adaptor if you’re travelling in a different country to be on the safe side!

REAPER Digital Audio Workstation 6.0 Adds FX Plug-in Embedding, Improved HiDPI Support

Filed under
Software

REAPER, a digital audio workstation and MIDI sequencer software for Windows, macOS and Linux, was updated to version 6.0 recently, getting support for embedding small versions of some plugins into the tracks and mixer panels, new auto-stretch timebase, improved support for Retina / HiDPI displays, and more.

Initially released back in 2005, REAPER (Rapid Environment for Audio Production, Engineering, and Recording) is developed by Cockos, an American digital audio technology company founded by Justin Frankel of Winamp and Gnutella peer-to-peer network fame.

The music production application had its first native experimental Linux release back in July 2018, and since then it has continued to improve, though it's still considered experimental on Linux.

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Devices: ROCK PI, OnLogic and RISC-V ISA-Based GPU

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Third Point Release for UCS 4.4

Filed under
Debian

As always, the errata updates of the past months have resulted in many small and large innovations, which we have collected and released with the release of UCS 4.4-3. I would like to give you an overview of the most important new features and an outlook on what we are currently working on. Important new features include better checking of required resources during installation, avoidance of Windows Explorer crashes with extended file system permissions, documentation of best practices in dealing with Windows printer drivers and printer settings, and improvements to the Samba 4 Connector.

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Proxmox VE 6.1 released!

Filed under
Debian

We are very excited to announce the general availability of Proxmox VE 6.1.

It is built on Debian Buster 10.2 and a specially modified Linux Kernel 5.3, QEMU 4.1.1, LXC 3.2, ZFS 0.8.2, Ceph 14.2.4.1 (Nautilus), Corosync 3.0, and more of the current leading open-source virtualization technologies.

This release brings new configuration options available in the GUI which make working with Proxmox VE even more comfortable and secure. Editing the cluster-wide bandwidth limit for traffic types such as migration, backup-restore, clone, etc. is possible via the GUI. If the optional package ifupdown2 of the Debian network interface manager is installed, it’s now possible to change the network configuration and reload it in the Proxmox web interface without a reboot. We have improvements to 2-factor authentication with TOTP and U2F.

The HA stack has been improved and comes with a new 'migrate' shutdown policy, migrating running services to another node on shutdown.

In the storage backend, all features offered by newer kernels with Ceph and KRBD are supported with version 6.1.

We have some notable bug fixes, one of them being the QEMU monitor timeout issue or stability improvements for corosync. Countless other bugfixes and smaller improvements are listed in the release notes.

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Tumbleweed Snapshots Rate Top-Notch, Get Krita, QEMU, Mesa Updates

Filed under
SUSE

Closing out the month, there were two snapshots with version upgrades and one snapshot (20191127) that produced some minor changes to a couple Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) packages.

The first Tumbleweed snapshot for December arrived with the 20191202 snapshot. Updated were also made to ALSA with the update of the 1.2.1.1 versions of alsa-plugins, alsa-utils and asla, which dropped 25 patches and fixed regressions for the UCM parser. GNOME had several package updates for gedit, evolution and more. The 3.34.2 version of gnome-software fixed a potential threading crash when using flatpak and had an upstream fix for fwupd. An updated version of ModemManager 1.12.0, which is a DBus-activated daemon that controls mobile broadband devices and connections, had a large amount of improvements and changes to include adding support for Mobile Station Based Assisted-GPS in addition to Mobile Station Assisted Assisted-GPS. Revision control tool mercurial 5.2 made some backwards compatibility changes and added some new feature extensions with its quarterly release. The update of perl 5.30.1 triggered an issue recorded on the snapshot reviewer because the newer version and patch that came in it is problematic for embedded Perl usage. Several other packages were updated in the snapshot to include qemu 4.1.93, re2 20191101, xen and xorg-x11-server. The one major version change in the snapshot was an update to terminal multiplexer tmux 3.0a; the major release that allows its users to easily switch between several programs in one terminal offers new features like added support for the SD (scroll down) escape sequence and for underscore colors.

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More OpenSUSE: Etherpad updated

Kernel: New Features and Fixes Added to Linux 5.5

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.5 Provides Knob To Toggle ASPM Link States Individually - Better Power-Savings

    ASPM can be a big boost to help power-savings on Linux laptops and desktops as shown by a prominent kernel regression a number of years ago. However, a number of Linux drivers are forced to disable Active State Power Management (ASPM) due to quirky/buggy hardware where it ends up not being sane to enable that power-saving feature by default. But with the Linux 5.5 kernel is support for toggling ASPM link states via sysfs as an easy-to-perform manner for achieving better power-savings with friendly devices.

  • AMDGPU Fixes For Linux 5.5 Include AMDKFD For PowerPC, Fix For Old ATI R100/R200 GPUs

    Following last week's big batch of DRM graphics driver updates for the Linux 5.5 merge window, AMD and the community engaging in Linux 5.5 testing have now sent in their first round of fixes for this next version of the Linux kernel.

  • Linux 5.5 Begins Plumbing Secure Boot Infrastructure For POWER9

    With the PowerPC changes for the Linux 5.5 kernel comes the initial infrastructure work on preparing to be able to handle a Secure Boot implementation for POWER9 hardware.

    With Linux 5.5 the initial groundwork is laid for supporting POWER9 Secure Boot but the actual IBM POWER9 firmware support for offering this functionality isn't yet released. As such, moving to Linux 5.5 alone won't impose any potential Secure Boot restrictions on existing users.

Software: Birdtray 1.7.0 Released, Curl at 10,000,000,000 and GStreamer 1.16.2

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Software
  • Thunderbird Tray Icon Email Notifier Birdtray 1.7.0 Released

    Birdtray, a Thunderbird tray icon for Linux (Xorg) and Windows that shows the number of unread emails, has seen a new major release. For the Birdtray 1.7.0 release, the developers have added translation support, the ability to draw a border around the number of unread emails in the tray, a new Birdtray icon, and more.

    Birdtray is a Firetray (which has been discontinued) alternative that shows Thunderbird in the tray, with an unread email counter on top of the icon; the tray icon can be set to flash when new email are received. However, unlike Firetray, Birdtray is a standalone application, and not a Thunderbird extension. Other Birdtray features include support for multiple email accounts, it can hide and restore the Thunderbird window (so it closes to the tray), and is highly configurable.

  • Daniel Stenberg: Daily web traffic

    By late 2019, there’s an estimated amount of ten billion curl installations in the world. Of course this is a rough estimate and depends on how you count etc.

    There are several billion mobile phones and tablets and a large share of those have multiple installations of curl. Then there all the Windows 10 machines, web sites, all macs, hundreds of millions of cars, possibly a billion or so games, maybe half a billion TVs, games consoles and more.

  • GStreamer 1.16.2 stable bug fix release

    The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the second bug fix release in the stable 1.16 release series of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

    This release only contains bugfixes and it should be safe to update from 1.16.x.

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More in Tux Machines

Akademy 2019

At this year's Akademy I had great moments with new and already known people. Akedemy gives me much power for hopefully the rest of the year. I really enjoyed the daytrip to the lake. It was calm and beautiful environment. The daytrip helped me to calm down again. Together with Leiner, Florian and Valorie we sat down to discuss issues for newcomers attending Akademy the first time while having an amazing lunch. Is it often hard to remember how hard it can be to attend the Akademy the first time without knowing lots of people. The outcome of this discussion will feed back to community after some more cleanup of our notes. Hopefully we can make the next Akademy even better for newcomers next year! My highlights from the first two days of great talks are Kirogi and "Developers Italia". I really enjoyed seeing that Open Source reaches more and more domains and now you can even control your drone with Open Source named Kirogi. The software itself looks already quite usable and I'm looking forward what features we will see there in future... "Developers Italia" was an eye opener, in how governments can change the laws so administrations must invest in Open Source. In Italy, administrations are forced to search for an existing solution in Open Source and then use this solution. If the software does not work for them they can pay developers to implement their needed features, but still the code will be owned by the administration and they need to publish the code afterwards under an Open Source license. I'm very interested to see how this will develop in future, because at the moment I still have the bad feeling that some big companies may have the ability and also the desire to destroy this revolutionary idea, with the result that only some big companies will get all the big grants, and the result will be bloated unusable Open Source software. But none the less, let's give the Italy administrations a warm welcome and give them a hand to become good Open Source citizens. I also enjoyed the talk by Albert about the status of fuzzing KDE software. Albert explained, that the first Frameworks are covered by fuzzing, and the results that were found by the fuzzer. The first days and weeks spit out a lot of interesting issues, but nowadays, the fuzzer takes a lot of time to find new issues. So it is time now to add the next set ready to be fuzzed. I talked with Albert about what would be the most valuable parts of KDEPIM that should be covered by fuzzing. The first set is KMime, KContacts and KCalenderCore as they handle input without any user interaction. Read more

Games: Plague Inc: Evolved, Dungeon 2 and OBS Studio

  • Trick the world in the Fake News update to Plague Inc: Evolved

    Plague Inc: Evolved just got another big free update with a fun new Fake News scenario giving you a chance to deceive the whole world. A great game you could already have a lot of fun with, as I did before naming a Bacteria after someone close. Now though, you're not dealing with coughs and colds but the spread of misinformation. Starting off with only one person being Deceived, you begin writing your Fake News Manifesto to evolve the information and it shall begin to spread. I decided to spread some fake news in the USA, that was started by Aliens because they just wanted to watch the world burn. You certainly can make some amusing things with it.

  • In AI Dungeon 2 the game is created as you play and it can be both impressive and ridiculous

    I can't even begin to understand the fancy AI learning stuff behind the scenes, but AI Dungeon 2 is certainly a very fun idea and a possible look into the future of games. AI Dungeon 2 is a text adventure, like the classics but with a huge twist as it's built with OpenAI opening up a huge amount of ever-expanding actions that are possible. It can be impressive, there's some really surprising and amusing interactions you can have with it.

  • OBS Studio 24.0.4 is out with numerous bug fixes, better Linux Window Capture

    A few days ago, a "Hotfix" update was released for the video capture and livestreaming FOSS application OBS Studio. OBS Studio 24.0.4 is quite a small release, but for those of you creating video content on Linux you might find this version working a lot better. For Linux especially, the Window Capture function got multiple fixes like certain windows just not appearing and sometimes multiple 0x0 windows would appear. Display Capture on Linux was also fixed up where the crop value would shift the cursor's captured position incorrectly.

Red Hat, IBM and Fedora's Kernel

  • CodeReady Workspaces devfile, demystified

    With the exciting advent of CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) 2.0 comes some important changes. Based on the upstream project Eclipse Che 7, CRW brings even more of the “Infrastructure as Code” idea to fruition. Workspaces mimic the environment of a PC, an operating system, programming language support, the tools needed, and an editor. The real power comes by defining a workspace using a YAML file—a text file that can be stored and versioned in a source control system such as Git. This file, called devfile.yaml, is powerful and complex. This article will attempt to demystify the devfile.

  • Building freely distributed containers with Podman and Red Hat UBI

    DevNation tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about building containers with Podman and Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI) from Scott McCarty and Burr Sutter. We will cover how to build and run containers based on UBI using just your regular user account—no daemon, no root, no fuss. Finally, we will order the de-resolution of all of our containers with a really cool command. After this talk, you will have new tools at the ready to help you find, run, build, and share container images.

  • Backfitting SLES 12 for IBM z15 – It’s in Our DNA

    For 20 years, SUSE has partnered with IBM to advance Linux on Z. From the early days of the IBM Linux Tech Center to an elaborate open source ecosystem, you might say that supporting IBM Z is part of our DNA. Several months ago, SUSE included support for the newly announced IBM z15 and IBM LinuxONE III systems as part of SLES 15. Now, with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for IBM Z and LinuxONE 12 SP5, we are backfitting all the latest IBM Z support for pervasive encryption and more. The latest IBM z15 system is designed to support your mission-critical initiatives and allow you to be innovative as you design and scale your environment. Combined with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for IBM Z and LinuxONE, these state-of-the-art systems provide an ultra-secure data serving platform to support the global economic growth we are seeing today.

  • Contribute at the Fedora Test Week for Kernel 5.4

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.4. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version has many security fixes included. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Monday, December 09, 2019 through Monday, December 16, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

Linux 5.5 Kernel Development: Latest

  • Re: [GIT PULL] treewide conversion to sizeof_member() for v5.5-rc1
    On Sat, Dec 7, 2019 at 11:48 AM Kees Cook wrote:
    >
    > Please pull this mostly mechanical treewide conversion to the single and
    > more accurately named sizeof_member() macro for the end of v5.5-rc1.
    
    So this one I'm _still_ not convinced about. It makes yet another name
    for something we've had before, which just annoys me. And maybe it's
    the 13-year old in me, but "sizeof_member()" just makes me go "that's
    puerile".
    
    I _can_ see why we'd want to standardize on one of the tree versions
    we have, but I can't really see the problem with the existing #define
    that we have, and that is used (admittedly not all that much):
    sizeof_field().
    
  • Linus Rejects "Size Of Member" Change From Linux 5.5 Kernel

    This weekend was the last-minute pull request by Google's Kees Cook to introduce the new sizeof_member() macro that had been previously rejected from Linux 5.4. Well, it was again rejected by Linus Torvalds prior to tagging the Linux 5.5-rc1 kernel. The sizeof_member() macro has been aimed to unify 2~3 other macros within the kernel tree currently and using the size-of-field moniker, but Cook argued that for measuring the size of a member of a C struct, the new macro is more appropriate and converted usage of the old macros to this new single macro.

  • WireGuard Sends Out Latest Patch Revision In Preparing For Linux 5.6

    While there are some pretty great features for Linux 5.5, one that didn't make it quite in time was the long-awaited introduction of WireGuard as the in-kernel secure VPN tunnel. While it was a bummer it didn't make 5.5, all indications are at this point is that it will be in Linux 5.6. With Linux 5.5 the crypto subsystem adopted some elements of WireGuard's "Zinc" crypto code and that in turn opened the door for merging WireGuard now that the cryptography side was sorted out. But WireGuard was too late for introduction in net-next even with a last minute attempt trying to get it into 5.5, but instead it's aiming early for merging to net-next to ensure it's timely introduction with Linux 5.6.