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Monday, 09 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry sorry downtime srlinuxx 21/12/2010 - 8:10am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS 2010.12 BitTorrent Links available Texstar 21/12/2010 - 8:07am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS 2010.12 Holiday CD's available Texstar 18/12/2010 - 11:11pm
Blog entry Enlightenment E17 Beta 3 update ready for PCLinuxOS Texstar 16/12/2010 - 9:50am
Blog entry Red Hat Layoffs srlinuxx 09/12/2010 - 6:40pm
Blog entry Woohoo, we're back srlinuxx 7 13/12/2010 - 1:19pm
Blog entry December 2010 Issue of The NEW PCLinuxOS Magazine Released Texstar 03/12/2010 - 4:36pm
Blog entry Malware Warning (resolved) srlinuxx 3 24/10/2010 - 10:51am
Blog entry Hard Drive Purchase and Thailand Flooding gfranken 30/10/2011 - 6:39pm
Blog entry Big Thank You for Donations srlinuxx 5 24/12/2011 - 9:43pm

10 skills every Linux system administrator should have

Filed under
Server

I know what you're saying. You're saying, "Oh, great, someone else telling me that I need soft skills." Yes, that's what I'm telling you. Honing your interviewing skills can not only determine if you get a particular job, it can also be a major factor in the salary you get. It's true. Let's say, for example, that the salary range for a mid-level SA job is $56k to $85k per year. You might be fully qualified for the top of the range, but the company offers you $70k instead and mentions some nonsense about growth potential or they tell you that they'll bring you along when the time is right.

You need to practice answering questions. Answer the question that's asked. Don't give so much information that you see eyes glazing over, but giving answers that are too short will make you appear arrogant or flippant. Give enough examples of your work to let the interviewer(s) know that you know what you're talking about. They can ask for more details if they want to.

You have to learn to watch other people's behaviors. Are they listening to you? Are they focused on you and the interview? Do they look as though you haven't said enough when you pause to allow them to speak or ask another question? Watch and learn. Practice with other system administrators in your group. Do mock interviews with the group. I know it might sound silly, but it's important to be able to speak to other people about what you do. This practice can also be good for you in speaking with managers. Don't get too deep into the weeds with non-technical people. Keep your answers concise and friendly, and offer examples to illustrate your points.

Read more

Games: Ciel Fledge, Slender Threads, XO and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Ciel Fledge, an intriguing post-apocalypse daughter raising sim releases next year

    It's 3716 and most of humanity lives on the floating city, ARK-3, to get away from a colossal alien threat that almost caused our extinction. Amongst all the chaos, a mysterious young girl is found and that's where you come in.

    Ciel Fledge is a game about raising an adopted daughter in a future world that still has hope. One we took a look at some time ago and it finally has a release date. Studio Namaapa and PQube Limited have announced it's releasing on February 21, 2020.

  • Slender Threads, a new point & click adventure thriller announced

    From the developer behind the rather amusing Nobodies and Kelvin and the Infamous Machine, Blyts just announced their new adventure thriller Slender Threads.

    In Slender Threads you will guide the protagonist, Harvey Green, an unremarkable travelling salesman through the scenic yet empty community of Villa Ventana. While nefarious, unseen forces exert increasingly more sway over him and the town's residents.

  • Retro styled strategic fleet defence game XO has entered Early Access

    In the space strategy game XO, you take command of the last remaining Battleship as you attempt to gather a fleet in a desperate bid to save humanity.

    Sound a bit like Battlestar Galactica? Well, it should. The team said they were actually inspired by Battlestar Galactica, The Lost Fleet series, and games like FTL. Jumpdrive Studios ran a successful Kickstarter campaign for it back in 2015, so it's been a while in the making.

  • Add jumping to your Python platformer game

    In the previous article in this series, you simulated gravity, but now you need to give your player a way to fight against gravity by jumping.

    A jump is a temporary reprieve from gravity. For a few moments, you jump up instead of falling down, the way gravity is pulling you. But once you hit the peak of your jump, gravity kicks in again and pulls you back down to earth.

    In code, this translates to variables. First, you must establish variables for the player sprite so that Python can track whether or not the sprite is jumping. Once the player sprite is jumping, then gravity is applied to the player sprite again, pulling it back down to the nearest object.

  • Trip the Ark Fantastic, a colourful story-driven adventure set in the Animal Kingdom announced

    An adventure through the Animal Kingdom in Trip the Ark Fantastic, announced today from Croatian developer Gamechuck.

    It's a story-driven adventure game set in the Animal Kingdom on the verge of both industrial and social revolution. It seems to put a new spin on the story of Noah's Ark, except this time the ancient myth here is that the ark was built by lions millennia ago to save all animals from a great flood. The story follows Charles, a hedgehog scholar on a mission by the lion king to save the monarchy, but his decisions could end up helping reformists or even to bring about anarchy.

Devices: Raspberry Pi, EEPD and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • The Nest Box: DIY Springwatch with Raspberry Pi

    Last week, lots and lots of you shared your Raspberry Pi builds with us on social media using the hashtag #IUseMyRaspberryPiFor. Jay Wainwright from Liverpool noticed the conversation and got in touch to tell us about The Nest Box, which uses Raspberry Pi to bring impressively high-quality images and video from British bird boxes to your Facebook feed.

  • SBCs and compact embedded PCs run Linux on Ryzen Embedded

    EEPD’s Linux-ready “ProFive NUCR” SBC and “Box-NUCR” embedded PC based on it are built around AMD’s Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC. The products follow the similar, but V1000-based ready “ProFive NUCV” and “Box-NUCV” released earlier this year.

    In mid-November, EEPD (or E.E.P.D.) announced an AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 based Box-NUCR embedded computer built in Germany that runs Ubuntu. The Box-NUCR, which is based on a separately available ProFive NUCR SBC, was promoted this week by AMD as part of an Ryzen Embedded open ecosystem of R1000 and V1000-based mini-PCs and compact embedded computers that also includes new OnLogic and ASRock systems. AMD’s ecosystem encompasses a similar Ryzen Embedded V1000 based Box-NUCV and ProFive NUCV SBC that were announced in February (see farther below.)

  • Grove Sensors For Raspberry Pi

    Raspberry Pi is a great invention that ever happened. The little $35 computer can be used to build from a cam kit to the future of kids in rural India. To learn more about what this little device can do or has done, read this article I wrote a while back.

    You can also visit Raspberry Pi’s official page and see how Raspberry Pi is being used for research and education.

    In this article, I will also use Raspberry Pi to create something very interesting and useful. I am going to use Grove Sensors with Raspberry Pi and monitor the environment around the device, for example, temperature, air pollution, and water, etc.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (389-ds-base, ghostscript, kernel, and tcpdump), Debian (libonig), Fedora (clamav, firefox, and oniguruma), openSUSE (calamares, cloud-init, haproxy, libarchive, libidn2, libxml2, and ucode-intel), Scientific Linux (SDL and tcpdump), Slackware (mozilla), and Ubuntu (haproxy, intel-microcode, and postgresql-common).

  • Samba Patch Caps Busy Year for IBM i Security

    IBM last week patched a moderately severe security flaw in IBM i’s Samba implementation that could enable hackers to access data they really shouldn’t be able to access. The disclosure caps a rather busy second half of the year for security patches on IBM i that saw 26 emergency PTFs and Yum updates for Node.js, Python, the Apache HTTP Server, OpenSSL, ISC Bind, IBM Navigator, and even Db2 Mirror for IBM i.

    On November 26, IBM issued this security bulletin to let people know about the new flaw in the Samba client. The flaw could allow a hacker to not only access files and folders on the affected server that are outside of the SMB network pathnames, but to also create files outside of the working directory, according to IBM’s description. The flaw, which carries a CVSS Base Score of 5.3, was fixed with a series of PTFs for IBM i 7.2, 7.3, and 7.4.

    It was the second patch that month, with the first coming on November 4, when IBM issued a security bulletin that discussed four separate vulnerabilities in Python that impact IBM i versions 7.2 through 7.4. All of the Python vulnerabilities are in the open source programing language, which runs on IBM i via the PASE Unix runtime, and not in any code that’s unique to IBM i.

  • RSA-240 Factored

    We are pleased to announce the factorization of RSA-240, from RSA's challenge list, and the computation of a discrete logarithm of the same size (795 bits): [...]

  • Authentication vulnerabilities in OpenBSD

    We discovered an authentication-bypass vulnerability in OpenBSD's authentication system: this vulnerability is remotely exploitable in smtpd, ldapd, and radiusd, but its real-world impact should be studied on a case-by-case basis. For example, sshd is not exploitable thanks to its defense-in-depth mechanisms.

  • Senators sound alarm on dangers of ransomware attacks after briefing [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Sen. Gary Peters (D-Mich.), another member of the Cybersecurity Caucus and the top Democrat on the chamber's Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, told reporters that while he was not at the briefing on Wednesday, he would support holding a public hearing on ransomware threats.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Why choose Budgie for your Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

No matter what desktop you use, there's always something you want to change about it. One of the most popular applications for the GNOME desktop is Tweaks, which contains all the preference settings left out of the GNOME Settings panel. The Solus Linux distribution features the Budgie desktop, which is best described as one great big GNOME tweak.

You may find Budgie in a software repository, but more likely, you'll have to download and install Solus Linux to experience it. You can install it into a virtual machine, like GNOME Boxes.

Read more

There is no “Linux” Platform (Part 1)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

In our community there is this idea that “Linux” is the third platform next to Windows and macOS. It’s closely connected to things like the “year of the Linux desktop”, and can be seen in the language around things like Flatpak, which bills itself as “The Future of Apps on Linux” and the Linux App Summit, which is “designed to accelerate the growth of the Linux application ecosystem”.

But what does that actually mean? What does a healthy app ecosystem look like? And why don’t we have one?

I think the core of the problem is actually the layer below that: Before we can have healthy ecosystems, we need healthy platforms to build them on.

[...]

The reasons for this are largely historical. In the early days, free software desktops were a bunch of independently developed components. They were not necessarily designed for each other, or well integrated. This meant in order to have a usable system, someone needed to curate these components and assemble them into an operating system: The first distributions were born.

Over the last decades this landscape has changed drastically, however. While GNOME 1 was a set of loosely coupled components, GNOME 2 was already much more cohesive and GNOME 3 is now essentially an integrated product. The shell, core apps, and underlying technologies are all designed with each other in mind, and provide a complete OS experience.

Desktops like GNOME have expanded their scope to cover most of the responsibilities of platforms, and are in effect platforms now, minus the OS part. They have a very clear vision of how the system should work, and app developers target them directly.

The elementary project has taken this development to its logical end point, and made its own vertically integrated OS and app store. This is why it’s the only “real” platform in the free software space at the moment.

Read more

Also: 17 Stunning Winter Wallpapers for Desktop & Laptops

Mozilla: Performance, Privacy Aspects and Gecko

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox 71 Linux Performance Isn't Looking All That Great

    With each new release of Firefox we set out to see how the performance is looking on the Linux desktop. One discovery we've made is that when using Intel's Clear Linux the Firefox performance is a lot more competitive to Google Chrome than we traditionally see on Ubuntu Linux. But with Firefox 71 we're seeing the performance trending lower compared to Firefox 69 and 70.

    Here are some benchmarks of Firefox 69 / 70 / 71 builds using the official Mozilla binaries along with Chrome 78. All of the benchmarks freshly done from the same system that this time around was running Clear Linux.

  • Mozilla locks nosy Avast, AVG extensions out of Firefox store amid row over web privacy

    The Firefox extensions built by Avast have been pulled from the open-source browser's online add-on store over privacy fears.

    Adblock Plus founder Wladimir Palant confirmed this week Mozilla has taken down the Avast Online Security and Avast-owned AVG Online Security extensions he reported to the browser maker, claiming the code was snooping on users' web surfing.

    The problem, as Palant has been documenting on his blog for some time, is that the extensions – which offer to do things like prevent malware infections and phishing – may go well beyond their needed level of access to user information to do their advertised functions.

    According to Palant, the Avast extensions, when installed in your browser, track the URL and title of every webpage you visit, and how you got to that page, along with a per-user identifier and details about your operating system and browser version, plus other metadata, and then transmit all that info back to Avast's backend servers. The user identifier is not always sent, according to Palant: it may not be disclosed if you have Avast Antivirus installed.

    The rub seems to be that Avast says it needs this personal data to detect dodgy and fraudulent websites, while Palant argues the company goes too far and wanders into spyware territory. While Avast's explanation is plausible, there are much better and safer ways to check visited pages for nastiness, typically involving cryptographic hashes of URLs, than firing off all visited web addresses to an Avast server, we note.

  • Zibi Braniecki: Multilingual Gecko – 2017-2018 – Rearchitecture

    Between 2017 and 2018 we refactored a major component of the Gecko Platform – the intl/locale module. The main motivator was the vision of Multilingual Gecko which I documented in a blog post.

    Firefox 65 brought the first major user-facing change that results from that refactor in form of Locale Selection. It’s a good time to look back at the scale of changes. This post is about the refactor of the whole module which enabled many of the changes that we were able to land in 2019 to Firefox.

  • How to stop third party tracking on health sites

    This practice isn’t always unlawful, but it is creepy. Tracking by third parties happens across a wide swath of websites, but it is especially unsettling for health-related websites.

    [...]

    If you’re fed up with the level of third party tracking happening on the web, take control of your personal data with Firefox with Enhanced Tracking Protection.

    The Firefox privacy protections dashboard reveals who’s trying to track you behind the scenes and helps you stop them. To see who’s trying to track you on individual webpages, click on the shield icon to the left of the Firefox address bar. (If you don’t see the shield, here’s how to update your Firefox.)

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Cooking With Linux and FLOSS Weekly on XWiki

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 2019-12-04 | Linux Headlines

    Canonical announces Ubuntu Pro, Netflix open sources Metaflow, and Plex has a new streaming service.

  • New "Cooking With Linux" Intro, Built Using Kdenlive

    A couple of days ago, as I was editing a new "Cooking With Linux" video, I realized that the CWL intro I had been using for so long, one I paid some poor soul on Fiverr to make for me, had a Google Plus link as part of the video. As you might know, Google Plus hasn't been around for a while now, so I put aside my mostly completed video (Audacity for Editing Podcasts) and set about creating my own CWL intro. This is what I came up with. Feel free to comment, to tell me it sucks, to appreciate it, or whatever.

  • FLOSS Weekly 558: XWiki

    XWiki is a free wiki software platform written in Java with a design emphasis on extensibility. It includes WYSIWYG editing, OpenDocument based document import/export, semantic annotations and tagging, and advanced permissions management.

Latest on Mesa Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 19.3.0-rc6
    Hi list,
    
    Available today is mesa 19.3.0-rc6. Things are starting to slow down, and there
    are now only two open issues in the 19.3 milestone, so I'm hopeful that next
    week will bring 19.3.0 final, and not an rc7, but I can always be surprised.
    
    By far radv + aco dominate the list of changes, but there's also changes to anv,
    panfrost, core gallium, fixes for OpenBSD, iris, and nir.
    
    Dylan
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (2):
          radv: Unify max_descriptor_set_size.
          radv: Fix timeline semaphore refcounting.
    
    Boris Brezillon (2):
          gallium: Fix the ->set_damage_region() implementation
          panfrost: Make sure we reset the damage region of RTs at flush time
    
    Christian Gmeiner (1):
          etnaviv: remove dead code
    
    Daniel Schürmann (2):
          aco: don't split live-ranges of linear VGPRs
          aco: fix a couple of value numbering issues
    
    Dylan Baker (1):
          VERSION: bump version for 19.3-rc6
    
    Jason Ekstrand (1):
          anv: Set up SBE_SWIZ properly for gl_Viewport
    
    Jonathan Gray (2):
          winsys/amdgpu: avoid double simple_mtx_unlock()
          i965: update Makefile.sources for perf changes
    
    Jordan Justen (1):
          iris: Allow max dynamic pool size of 2GB for gen12
    
    Kenneth Graunke (2):
          driconf, glsl: Add a vs_position_always_invariant option
          drirc: Set vs_position_always_invariant for Shadow of Mordor on Intel
    
    Rhys Perry (5):
          aco: propagate p_wqm on an image_sample's coordinate p_create_vector
          aco: fix i2i64
          aco: add v_nop inbetween exec write and VMEM/DS/FLAT
          radv: set writes_memory for global memory stores/atomics
          nir/lower_io_to_vector: don't create arrays when not needed
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (2):
          radv: fix enabling sample shading with SampleID/SamplePosition
          radv/gfx10: fix implementation of exclusive scans
    
    
    git tag: mesa-19.3.0-rc6
    
  • Mesa 19.3 Might Release Next Week But For Now There's RC6 With Several ACO+RADV Fixes

    Mesa 19.3 continues running behind schedule but stands chances for releasing next week if the lingering blocker bugs are closed.

    Mesa 19.3-RC6 was released today as the newest weekly release candidate and it brought with it several random RADV fixes, a number of ACO compiler back-end fixes that also benefit RADV, a few Gallium3D fixes, an Intel Iris Gen12 fix, and a workaround for Shadow of Mordor on Intel graphics.

  • Mesa Devs Discuss Potentially Dropping Non-Gallium Drivers Or Forking Code For Gallium

    Longtime open-source AMD graphics driver developer Marek Olšák has kicked off a discussion over the possibility in the not too distant future of either dropping non-Gallium3D drivers from Mesa (and moving them off to a maintenance branch or the like) or forking some of Mesa's existing code to allow it to be better optimized for Gallium3D use-cases. Due to raised concerns, other possibilities are also being expressed like simply moving ahead with optimizing the Mesa code-base for Gallium3D at a cost of potentially hitting dead code more often with the classic drivers.

    As it stands now, the only relevant non-Gallium3D driver in the Mesa code-base is Intel i965. While that's currently the default Intel driver, for Broadwell "Gen8" graphics and newer they will be transitioning to their new Iris Gallium3D driver by default expected to happen for Mesa 20.0. The i965 driver will still be around for Haswell and older generations to come -- either within mainline Mesa or some maintenance branch. As part of this new Mesa discussion was a hypothetical comment about creating a new Intel Gallium3D driver for Haswell and older, but that's extremely unlikely to happen and was just brought up as a matter of being thorough. There aren't the extra resources available to create an Intel Gallium3D driver for aging Haswell and older hardware plus that it would likely take around a year to develop and even longer before reaching performance parity to i965.

  • Remove classic drivers or fork src/mesa for gallium?
    Hi,
    
    Here are 2 proposals to simplify and better optimize the GL->Gallium
    translation.
    
    1) Move classic drivers to a fork of Mesa, and remove them from master.
    Classic drivers won't share any code with master. glvnd will load them, but
    glvnd is not ready for this yet.
    
    2) Keep classic drivers. Fork src/mesa for Gallium. I think only mesa/main,
    mesa/vbo, mesa/program, and drivers/dri/common need to be forked and
    mesa/state_tracker moved. src/gallium/state-trackers/gl/ can be the target
    location.
    
    Option 2 is more acceptable to people who want to keep classic drivers in
    the tree and it can be done right now.
    
    Opinions?
    
    Thanks,
    Marek
    

Games: Stadia, Rocket League, Dead Cells, Lutris on Fedora

Filed under
Gaming
  • Stadia Live Streaming with Farming Simulator 19

    No, I don't know anything about this game and yes, it's my first time playing.

  • The big Rocket League update that kicked out loot boxes is now live

    Psyonix have given loot boxes the boot in the latest update to Rocket League, with a new Blueprint and Item Shop system. There's a whole lot more to it too.

    Instead of loot boxes, they now have a Blueprint system where you know what the item is and so there's no gambling involved. These Blueprints can drop after an online match.

  • Motion Twin announce The Bad Seed expansion for Dead Cells

    The first paid DLC is on the way for Dead Cells, with Motion Twin hoping The Bad Seed will help their spin-off company Evil Empire continue pushing out further free content updates.

    Sounds like they've been seriously busy (announcement here). With The Bad Seed DLC releasing in "Q1" next year, they've said it will be around $5 and since they've been doing quite meaty free updates for a while, it seems quite reasonable. If things go well with this DLC, they said they're aiming for at least another two years of free content updates for everyone to the base game.

  • Fedora 31 : Lutris the Open Source gaming platform for Linux.

    Lutris is an Open Source gaming platform for Linux. It installs and launches games so you can start playing without the hassle of setting up your games. Get your games from GOG, Steam, Battle.net, Origin, Uplay and many other sources running on any Linux powered gaming machine.

Dell XPS 13 7390 Review: The Best Laptop For Desktop Linux Users

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Gone are the days when we had to do a lot of research and read a lot of reviews to find a machine that would work with the least amount of trouble with the desktop Linux distribution of choice. Today, almost every machine out there can run Linux. The kernel community has done an incredible job with device driver support to make everything work out of the box.

Still, there are machines that can run Linux, and then there are machines that run Linux. Dell machines fall in the latter category. Five years ago, Barton George started a program within Dell to bring desktop Linux to consumer grade, high-end Dell systems. What started as one machine is now an entire line of high-end laptops and desktops.

Among these machines, XPS 13 is my favorite. While I need a really powerful desktop to handle my 4K UHD, multicam video production, I also need an ultra-portable laptop that I can bring with me anywhere without having to worry about a bulky backpack and charger. XPS 13 was also my very first laptop, which lasted me more than 7 years. So, yes, there is that nostalgic factor, too.

Read more

Disney+ Now Works on Linux, No Workarounds Required

Filed under
Linux

Disney launched its new video streaming service in the USA and Canada last month to much hype and attention (it scores 10 million subscribers in the first day alone).

But many Linux users in those countries who’d been hoping to tune in to watch shows like The Mandalorian and High School Musical: The Musical: The Series were left disappointed.

For although rival streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime work “out of the box” on Linux in web browsers like Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox, Disney+ didn’t.

Read more

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those looking to spend less than $200 USD on a graphics card, the recently launched NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER offers great value starting at $159 USD and working well with the NVIDIA Linux driver for providing decent 1080p Linux gaming performance as well as OpenCL / CUDA support. Here are benchmarks of the GTX 1650 SUPER alongside a total of 18 lower-end/mid-range AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards on Ubuntu Linux.

The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER features 1280 CUDA cores, a reference 1530MHz base clock, 1725MHz boost clock, 4GB of GDDR6 video memory on a 128-bit bus, and other common NVIDIA Turing GPU features sans this being a GTX part and not RTX thus no RT cores.

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Rock Pi N10 SBC delivers AI-enhanced RK3399Pro starting at $99

Filed under
Android
Debian

Radxa’s “Rock Pi N10” SBC runs Debian or Android 8.1 on an RK3399Pro for $99 (4GB RAM/16GB eMMC), $129 (6GB/32GB), or $169 (8GB/64GB), with the RAM split between the 6x CPU cores and the up to 3-TOPS NPU. The SBC is built around a Vamrs VMARC RK3399Pro SoM.

Radxa has gone to Seeed to launch an open-spec, community-backed Rock Pi N10 SBC with an AI-enabled Rockchip RK3399Pro SoC delivered via Vamrs’ VMARC RK3399Pro SoM compute module. While the RK3399Pro is essentially a hexa-core RK3399 that adds an up to 3-TOPS NPU, the Rock Pi N10 is not just a Rock Pi 4 with an updated Pro SoC. Unlike that RK3399-based Raspberry Pi pseudo-clone, the Rock Pi N10 is a sandwich-style 100 x 100mm board. Despite the larger size, the feature set is very similar.

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Attacks, Openwashing, and Assimilation Tactics

Filed under
Misc

         

  • How a Patent on Sorting Photos Got Used to Sue a Free Software Group

           

             

    Taking and sharing pictures with wireless devices has become a common practice. It’s hardly a recent development: the distinction between computers and cameras has shrunk, especially since 2007 when smartphone cameras became standard. Even though devices that can take and share photos wirelessly have become ubiquitous over a period spanning more than a decade, the Patent Office granted a patent on an “image-capturing device” in 2018.

             

    A patent on something so commonplace might be comical, but unfortunately, U.S. Patent No. 9,936,086 is already doing damage to software innovation. It’s creating litigation costs for real developers. The creator of this patent is Rothschild Patent Imaging LLC, or RPI, a company linked to a network of notorious patent trolls connected to inventor Leigh Rothschild. We've written about two of them before: Rothschild Connected Devices Innovations, and Rothschild Broadcast Distribution Systems. Now, RPI has used the ’086 patent to sue the Gnome Foundation, a non-profit that makes free software.

  • News organizations are engaging more proactively in open-source journalism to rebuild trust in news media

    As news media skepticism grows worldwide and digital tools become increasingly robust and available, reporters and news organizations are engaging more proactively in open-source journalism — a practice in which reporters investigate and construct stories based on publicly available data, including via social media, per The New York Times.

    As digital resources and social media have given all people a public, open platform to communicate, user-generated content has become primary source material and created a trail for open-source journalists to investigate. And by performing investigative research in this way, reporters can more easily connect directly to visual evidence on the web, rather than refer to private sources.

  • It's Hipp to be square: What happened when SQLite creator met GitHub

    There are two notable points in Hipp's report. For one, he feels that Git could be improved. He considers the Git Rebase command, which alters or removes the history of a commit, to be harmful. Since Git's own documentation of Rebase is full of warnings about misuse, this is not surprising, though there are circumstances where it can be useful. Hipp is also keen to see a means of revising the comments on previous check-ins because of the importance of documentation.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • tee is broken?

    Just found a highly surprising behavior in a core tool I've used for decades, so clearly I'm making a note here.

    [...]

    Answer time! After a tee, a single writer parent feeds two reader children. If a child exits before reading all the data, then when the parent tries to feed that dead child, the parent will get a SIGPIPE. And apparently the default behavior of tee in GNU coreutils (and in the zsh multios redirection) is to give up and to stop feeding all the children at that point. So the second child (wc -l in the examples) ends up with incomplete input. No errors are thrown anywhere, and there's no indication at all that any data was truncated. Lots of the data is just silently missing.

  • 4 ways to control the flow of your awk script

    There are many ways to control the flow of an awk script, including loops, switch statements and the break, continue, and next commands.

  • Qt 5.14.0 RC released

    Qt 5.14.0 RC is released today. As usual you can get it by using online installer (for new installations) or by using maintenance tool (existing online installation). And in addition there is also offline installers in qt account or download.qt.io for users who can't use online ones. Delta to beta3 as an attachment.

    Target is to release Qt 5.14.0 12th December so please test RC now & report all new release blockers immediately. Also make sure those are visible in release blocker list (https://bugreports.qt.io/issues/?filter=21539). But remember that Qt 5.14.1 is also coming soon so we can fix most of findings there and fix only real blockers in '5.14.0'.

  • Qt 5.14 On Track For Releasing Next Week With New Scenegraph Renderer, Better HiDPI

    While missing the original release target of the end of November, The Qt Company is buttoning up Qt 5.14 for debut next week. Today, however, marks the release candidate availability for those wanting to test out this forthcoming Qt5 release prior to more of the development efforts shifting to Qt 6.0.

  • Rust 2020

    Technically speaking, it’s past the deadline for #rust2020 posts, but I’m running late this year, and I’m going to post something anyway. In this post, I am focusing on what I see as the “largest scale” issues, and not on technical initiatives. If I have time, I will try to post a follow-up talking about some of the key technical initiatives that I think we should focus on as well.

  • Automatically downloading nursery photos from ParentZone using Selenium

    My son goes to a nursery part-time, and the nursery uses a system called ParentZone from Connect Childcare to send information between us (his parents) and nursery. Primarily, this is used to send us updates on the boring details of the day (what he’s had to eat, nappy changes and so on), and to send ‘observations’ which include photographs of what he’s been doing at nursery. 

  • Auto-generating API specifications as OpenAPI, WSDL and Sphinx

    Let's consider the services below - they represent a subset of a hypothetical API of a telecommunication company. In this case, they are to do with pre-paid cards. Deploy them on your servers in a module called api.py.

    Note that their implementation is omitted, we only deal with their I/O, as it is expressed using SimpleIO.

    What we would like to have, and what we will achieve here, is a website with static HTML describing the services in terms of a formal API specification.

  • GUI Automation using Pyautogui, Python

    PYAUTOGUI is an automation module provided by Python for controlling keyboard and mouse functions via program. This module has almost all the functions which can be performed by keyboard and mouse. We can use these functions to automate mouse and keyboard actions.

  • Beautiful Soup: Build a Web Scraper With Python

    The incredible amount of data on the Internet is a rich resource for any field of research or personal interest. To effectively harvest that data, you’ll need to become skilled at web scraping. The Python libraries requests and Beautiful Soup are powerful tools for the job. If you like to learn with hands-on examples and you have a basic understanding of Python and HTML, then this tutorial is for you.

  • Tensorflow 2.0: Solving Classification and Regression Problems

    After much hype, Google finally released TensorFlow 2.0 which is the latest version of Google's flagship deep learning platform. A lot of long-awaited features have been introduced in TensorFlow 2.0. This article very briefly covers how you can develop simple classification and regression models using TensorFlow 2.0.

  • Two New Typosquatting Libraries Found on PyPI

    Two new malicious packages were found on the Python Packaging Index (PyPI) that were designed to steal GPG and SSH keys according to ZDNet. The packages were named python3-dateutil and jeIlyfish where the first “L” is actually an I. These two libraries mimicked the dateutil and jellyfish packages respectively.

  • Framework Patterns

    A software framework is code that calls your (application) code. That's how we distinguish a framework from a library. Libraries have aspects of frameworks so there is a gray area.

    My friend Christian Theune puts it like this: a framework is a text where you fill in the blanks. The framework defines the grammar, you bring some of the words. The words are the code you bring into it.

    If you as a developer use a framework, you need to tell it about your code. You need to tell the framework what to call, when. Let's call this configuring the framework.

    There are many ways to configure a framework. Each approach has its own trade-offs. I will describe some of these framework configuration patterns here, with brief examples and mention of some of the trade-offs. Many frameworks use more than a single pattern. I don't claim this list is exhaustive -- there are more patterns.

    The patterns I describe are generally language agnostic, though some depend on specific language features. Some of these patterns make more sense in object oriented languages. Some are easier to accomplish in one language compared to another. Some languages have rich run-time introspection abilities, and that make certain patterns a lot easier to implement. A language with a powerful macro facility will make other patterns easier to implement.

    Where I give example code, I will use Python. I give some abstract code examples, and try to supply a few real-world examples as well. The examples show the framework from the perspective of the application developer.

  • Django 3 taps Python async to speed web apps

    Django 3.0, the newest version of the Python framework that allows fast creation of database-backed websites and web services, now supports Python async, one of the most powerful new features in Python to make websites and network services faster.

    Async allows Python programs, especially networking apps, to run more efficiently, but existing applications must be rewritten to use it. Django 3 will only work with Python 3.6 and later versions, the better to work with Python’s async programming features. 

    A key way Django provides support for async is via ASGI, a protocol that serves as a standard interface between asynchronous Python applications and async-capable web servers. Previously, Django only supported WSGI, which only supported synchronous web applications. Django 3 will only allow async features to run in an app if it’s deployed as ASGI.

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  • CSS: An Art, a Science, a Nightmare (Overview of CSS Concepts)

                         

                           

    Some people think CSS is really hard and it's too much of a hassle to learn. Some people think that since it's not a programming language (or is it?), it's so easy that you don't even have to bother learning it. Ultimately, there's a lot to CSS, but it doesn't have to be overwhelming. If you learn a few key concepts, you should feel confident looking at or thinking of any design and turning it into reality.

                           

    I'm going to go over some of the parts of CSS that are important on a daily basis, and give some of tips and tricks I've come to learn over the years.

  •                    

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Use the Fluxbox Linux desktop as your window manager

The concept of a desktop may differ from one computer user to another. Many people see the desktop as a home base, or a comfy living room, or even a literal desktop where they place frequently used notepads, their best pens and pencils, and their favorite coffee mug. KDE, GNOME, Pantheon (and so on) provide that kind of comfort on Linux. But for some users, the desktop is just empty monitor space, a side effect of not yet having any free-floating application windows projected directly onto their retina. For these users, the desktop is a void over which they can run applications—whether big office and graphic suites, or a simple terminal window, or docked applets—to manage services. This model of operating a POSIX computer has a long history, and one branch of that family tree is the *box window managers: Blackbox, Fluxbox, and Openbox. Fluxbox is a window manager for X11 systems that's based on an older project called Blackbox. Blackbox development was waning when I discovered Linux, so I fell into Fluxbox, and I've used it ever since on at least one of my active systems. It is written in C++ and is licensed under the MIT open source license. Read more

Software: Deb-pacman, Kiwi TCMS and Curl

  • Deb-pacman : A Pacman-style Frontend For APT Package Manager

    Apt, Advanced Packaging Tool, is a powerful command line tool used to install, update, upgrade and remove packages in Debian and its derivatives like Ubuntu. There are several frontends available for Apt, such as Aptitude, Synaptic and Ubuntu software center to name a few. Today I am going to introduce yet another frontend for APT package manager called Deb-pacman. Deb-pacman is a Bash script that emulates the functionality of Pacman (the package manager for Arch Linux and its variants). Using Deb-pacman, you can use the pacman commands, as the way you use them under Arch Linux to install, update, upgrade and remove packages, in a Debian-based system. You can simply invoke “pacman” instead of “apt” command in your Ubuntu system. Deb-pacman simply emulates the Archlinux’s Pacman package manager feel for Debian users who may prefer the style of Pacman over Apt. This can be helpful for those who get used to pacman. As you know already Apt itself was originally designed as a front-end for dpkg, which was developed by Ian Murdock (founder of Debian project) for Debian OS to install, remove and provide information about .deb packages. So technically speaking Deb-pacman is a front end for APT which is a frontend for Dpkg. In other words, it is just a wrapper.

  • Kiwi TCMS 7.2

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 7.2! This is an improvement & bug fix release which includes new database migrations and API methods, internal refactoring and updated translations. You can explore everything at https://public.tenant.kiwitcms.org!

  • Daniel Stenberg: This is your wake up curl

    One of the core functionalities in libcurl is the ability to do multiple parallel transfers in the same thread. You then create and add a number of transfers to a multi handle. Anyway, I won’t explain the entire API here but the gist of where I’m going with this is that you’ll most likely sooner or later end up calling the curl_multi_poll() function which asks libcurl to wait for activity on any of the involved transfers – or sleep and don’t return for the next N milliseconds. Calling this waiting function (or using the older curl_multi_wait() or even doing a select() or poll() call “manually”) is crucial for a well-behaving program. It is important to let the code go to sleep like this when there’s nothing to do and have the system wake up it up again when it needs to do work. Failing to do this correctly, risk having libcurl instead busy-loop somewhere and that can make your application use 100% CPU during periods. That’s terribly unnecessary and bad for multiple reasons.

Gamechuck sponsors Krita

Gamechuck, a new studio based in Zagreb, has just released the first trailer for their upcoming role-playing adventure game Trip the Ark Fantastic. Trip the Ark Fantastic is planned for release in 2022 on PC/Mac/Linux and consoles, and Gamechuck has created the game entirely with free software. What’s more, they have also decided to sponsor Krita’s development! Trip the Ark Fantastic is a story-driven roleplaying adventure set in the Animal Kingdom on the verge of both industrial and social revolution. The story follows Charles, a hedgehog scholar on a mission by the lion king to save the monarchy, but his decisions could end up helping reformists or even to bring about anarchy. Read more Also: Interview with teteotolis