Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 23 Feb 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 23/02/2020 - 10:10pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 23/02/2020 - 6:38pm
Story Ubuntu’s Installer Slideshow Gets a Focal Refresh Roy Schestowitz 1 23/02/2020 - 6:26pm
Story Toradex launches Verdin module family starting with i.MX8M Mini and Nano models Rianne Schestowitz 1 23/02/2020 - 6:23pm
Story An Insight to PureOS 9.0 Hephaestus Rianne Schestowitz 23/02/2020 - 5:54pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2020 - 5:29pm
Story Planet Changes and Cilium Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2020 - 5:21pm
Story OSS and Development Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2020 - 5:18pm
Story Web Standards Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2020 - 5:14pm
Story Security and Scare for Sale Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2020 - 5:10pm

An Insight to PureOS 9.0 Hephaestus

Filed under
OS

Unlike many other secure & privacy-respecting operating systems, PureOS does not get celebration in every release. Say for example QubesOS, Tails, Whonix, and OpenBSD, they all get celebrations every time they reach a new version. However, after a period of version 8.0, now PureOS reaches version 9.0 as per February 2020 I could tell. This article overviews PureOS in general and version 9.0 in particular starting from a little Librem computers intro, then things about the new Amber codename, the switch from Rolling to Stable style of release, and more. I also added valuable links at the end about its history and development. I hope this article can sum up well about PureOS for you. Enjoy!

Read more

Planet Changes and Cilium

Filed under
Misc
  • Planet Arch Linux migration

    The software behind planet.archlinux.org was implemented in Python 2 and is no longer maintained upstream. This functionality has now been implemented in archlinux.org's archweb backend which is actively maintained but offers a slightly different experience.

  • Cilium drops 1.7 release, upping insight and manageability

    Network and API connectivity project Cilium has been released in version 1.7, providing users with a UI for observability platform Hubble and the option to apply cluster-wide network policies.

    Cilium is an open source project developed by US startup Isovalent to provide and secure network connectivity and load balancing for workloads such as application containers or processes. It is based on a virtual machine-like construct called Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) which can be found in the Linux kernel.

OSS and Development

Filed under
Development
OSS
  • Someone is selling the free, open source Playnite launcher on Steam for $100

    Playnite is a free open source PC application designed to be an all-in-one answer to the growing number of game launchers we've all got on our desktops. In other words, it combines libraries from the likes of Steam, Epic Games Store, Uplay and GOG Galaxy, and then lets you organise them however you see fit. Jody tried it last year and came away impressed.

    I should emphasise the "free" above: it is available straight from the source here and, according to the site, "no features are locked behind a paywall and the complete source code is available under the MIT license". The MIT license basically surrenders the software to any kind of use with no restrictions, including resales.

  • uGet is an open source download manager for Windows and Linux that also supports Torrents and Video downloads

    The GUI has four panes, a menu bar and a toolbar. The Status pane in the top left corner displays all downloads and the ones which are Active, Queuing, Finished, and Recycled (deleted). The total number of downloads for each category is displayed next to its name, and you can click on any of these to see the list of items contained.

    Switch to the Category pane to jump between the default and the ones you have created. You can use the Category menu to add new sorting options, set the default download folder for each category, maximum active downloads, and also the maximum upload and download speeds.

    The pane below the toolbar is the download list pane; anything that you select in the status pane is displayed here. It shows the name, the file size of the download that has been completed, the total size, the progression percentage, time left to complete the download, and the upload/download speeds of each file. The View menu can be used to customize the columns that are displayed in the list pane, and the other visual elements of the program. Highlighting an item in the download list brings up its summary on the bottom pane.

  • Open Source Music Tagger Picard 2.3 Released With Custom MP4 Tags Support

    Free and Open source MusicBrainz announced the point release of Picard 2.3 with major changes to the user interface, tag, and desktop integration support.

    MusicBrainz stores all the metadata of the music and Picard is the official tag editor that helps in identifying and organizing the digital audio recording.

  • For Square Crypto, the Way to Bitcoin Mass Adoption Is Open Source

    When Jack Dorsey founded Square in February 2009, Bitcoin was all of one month old. In fact, Satoshi Nakamoto and Dorsey were likely laying the groundwork for their respective creations concurrently in the year prior. Ten years later, the two would converge in what now seems like an inevitable collision.

    Square launched its Venmo-like payment service, Cash App, in 2013. The application features common stock investing, and i

  • Gold-nuggeting: Machine learning tool simplifies target discovery for pen testers

    Recognizing this analogy with the precious metals industry, researchers at Delve Labs have developed Batea, an open source tool that leverages machine learning to find valuable information in network device data.

  • ’Second Revolution’ In Electronic Bond Trading

    Sri Ambati, chief executive and founder at H2O.ai, told Markets Media that the firm’s open source platform can perform one billion regressions in less than five seconds.

  • Google ‘AutoFlip’ can resize video using AI

    The way we consume video has changed a lot over the course of the last decade. We now watch videos on our mobile devices from anywhere and because of this, video content comes in a wide variety of formats. Google recognizes this shift and so last week their AI team announced ‘AutoFlip’ an open-source framework for “intelligent video reframing.”

  • This open-source framework, ‘AutoFlip’, can do automated video cropping using AI

    Many times when we see a video on mobile devices is badly cropped, it is not much you can do about it. Understanding this problem, Google’s AI’s team has built an open-source solution on top of MediaPipe, Autoflip, which can reframe a video that fits any device or dimension (landscape, portrait, etc.).

    AutoFlip works in three phases. The first phase includes scene detection; the second is the video content analysis, and the third is reframing. For this tool, if a video and a target dimension are given, it analyzes the video content. Later it develops optimal tracking and cropping strategies, which finally enables it to create an output video at the same time limit in the desired aspect ratio.

  • Tech Events in Africa: Nerds Unite, Open Source Festival and #CodeZone

    It’s a new week and another opportunity to meet up with like-minded people, become better in your chosen field and seal those deals for your startup. And we at TechNext want to help with a list of tech events happening around you this week.

  • An unofficial version of Brave browser brings native ARM64 support

    Privacy-focused Brave browser launched late last year after almost four years of being in the works. The browser is based on the Chromium open-source project and joins the likes of Microsoft Edge that is built on that platform. However, while Mozilla Firefox and Microsoft’s offering currently support ARM64 PCs natively in the stable channels, Brave does not.

    That might change, as Windows Insider MVP Jeremy Sinclair was able to compile an unofficial build of the open-source Brave browser that natively supports ARM64 PCs. The recompiled build (version 1.6.33) uses Microsoft’s ARM64 Chromium libraries and can run natively on those PCs like the Surface Pro X. Samsung Galaxy Book S. Native support results in improved performance and efficiency since the browser will not have to run in emulation.

  • The Brave web browser is taking on Google Chrome: Is it safe?

    The creator of Brave, Brendan Eich, also created JavaScript and co-founded the Mozilla Project that led to the development of the Firefox browser.

    Brave is based on the open-source Chromium browser that’s also the basis for Google’s Chrome, Opera and most recently Microsoft’s Chromium Edge browser.

    Open-source means that anyone can take the source code and build whatever they’d like out of it, but it doesn’t mean that all the browsers are the same.

    In the case of Brave, they chose to focus on user privacy by blocking trackers, scripts and ads by default.

    The natural by-product of blocking all this activity that usually goes unnoticed by the average user is faster load times.

    Brave can also make use of the wide variety of extensions for Chromium-based browsers via the Chrome Web Store at chrome.google.com.

  • This new tool could improve economic analysis of sub-national climate policies in the US

    Empowered by the Paris Agreement and a lack of national leadership on climate policy in the United States, state and local governments are leading on their own climate initiatives. California, New York and Colorado have set ambitious greenhouse gas emission and renewable energy targets for 2030. Just last week, Massachusetts introduced sweeping climate legislation targeting net zero emissions by 2050.

    As these environmental and energy policies move ahead, experts need to invest in economic data and tools that allow them to conduct robust economic analysis, to better inform policymakers, stakeholders and the public on how to design robust alternative climate and energy policies.

  • 2020 Open Access Award Finalists Named

    The Benjamin Franklin Award for Open Access in the Life Sciences is a humanitarian/bioethics award presented annually by Bioinformatics.org to an individual who has, in his or her practice, promoted free and open access to the materials and methods used in the life sciences.

  • Are we having fund yet, npm? CTO calls for patience after devs complain promised donations platform has stalled

    At the end of August, JavaScript package registry NPM Inc said it intended "to finalize and launch an Open Source funding platform by the end of 2019."

    But instead of a platform, what's available at the moment might be better referred to as a feature of the npm command-line interface (CLI).

    The announcement was received with some skepticism at the time and the project hasn't managed to defy that expectation: There was a minor milestone last November with the addition of the "fund" command to npm v6.13.0. But not much has changed since then.

  • RcppSimdJson 0.0.2: First Update!

    RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic simdjson library by Daniel Lemire which truly impressive. Via some very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in persing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. I highly recommend the video of the recent talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (which was also voted best talk). The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle use per byte parsed.

    This release syncs the simdjson headers with upstream, and polishes the build a little by conditioning on actually having a C++17 compiler rather than just suggesting it. The NEWS entry follows.

  • Nvidia Blames ‘Misunderstanding’ for Activision Faux Pas

    When Nvidia Corp. abruptly dropped Activision Blizzard Inc. games from its new GeForce Now service earlier this week, it left customers wondering what happened.

    Nvidia said on Tuesday that Activision had asked to have its titles removed from GeForce, but didn’t explain why. It turns out that the video-game giant wanted a commercial agreement with Nvidia before they proceeded -- and the situation stemmed from a simple misunderstanding, Nvidia said on Thursday.

Web Standards

Filed under
Web
  • Inrupt, Tim Berners-Lee's Solid, and Me

    All of this is a long-winded way of saying that I have joined a company called Inrupt that is working to bring Tim Berners-Lee's distributed data ownership model that is Solid into the mainstream. (I think of Inrupt basically as the Red Hat of Solid.) I joined the Inrupt team last summer as its Chief of Security Architecture, and have been in stealth mode until now.

    The idea behind Solid is both simple and extraordinarily powerful. Your data lives in a pod that is controlled by you. Data generated by your things -- your computer, your phone, your IoT whatever -- is written to your pod. You authorize granular access to that pod to whoever you want for whatever reason you want. Your data is no longer in a bazillion places on the Internet, controlled by you-have-no-idea-who. It's yours. If you want your insurance company to have access to your fitness data, you grant it through your pod. If you want your friends to have access to your vacation photos, you grant it through your pod. If you want your thermostat to share data with your air conditioner, you give both of them access through your pod.

  • World wide web founder scales up efforts to reshape internet
  • Sir Tim Berners-Lee's Inrupt is Redesigning the way the web is to Work and Apple is working with them on their Data Transfer Project

    Inrupt, the start-up company founded by Sir Tim Berners-Lee to redesign the way the web works, is expanding its operational team and launching pilot projects in its quest to develop a "massively scalable, production-quality technology platform."

  • Inconsistent user-experiences with native lazy-loading images

    The specification for web browser native support for lazy-loading images landed in the HTML Living Standard a week ago. This new feature lets web developers tell the browser to defer loading an image until it is scrolled into view, or it’s about to be scrolled into view.

    Images account for 49 % of the median webpage’s byte size, according to the HTTP Archive. Lazy image loading can help reduce these images’ impact on page load performance. It can also help lower data costs by clients that never scroll down to images far down on a page.

    Historically, lazy-loading was implemented by responding to changes in the scroll position and tracking the image element’s offset from the top of the page. This could degrade page-scrolling performance. Comparatively, the new native lazy loading for images is easier to implement and doesn’t degrade scrolling performance.

Security and Scare for Sale

Filed under
Security
  • Malware Attack Takes ISS World's Systems Offline

    Founded in 1901, the Copenhagen, Denmark-based company provides cleaning, support, property, catering, security, and facility management services for offices, factories, airports, hospitals, and other locations all around the world.

    At the moment, the company’s employees don’t have access to corporate systems, as they were taken offline following a malware attack earlier this week.

  • The rise and rise of ransomware [iophk: Windows TCO]
  • Security flaws belatedly fixed in open source SuiteCRM software

    According to Romano, a second-order PHP object injection vulnerability (CVE-2020-8800) in SuiteCRM could be “exploited to inject arbitrary PHP objects into the application scope, allowing an attacker to perform a variety of attacks, such as executing arbitrary PHP code”.

    SuiteCRM versions 7.11.11 and below are said to be vulnerable.

    [...]

    “We have put a notice on our open source community channels and advice via social media. We have a dedicated community that works around the clock to spot vulnerabilities and produce suitable fixes, which is one of the key benefits for a business when choosing to use open source software.”

  • With the rise of third-party code, zero-trust is key

    The surface area of website and web application attacks keeps growing. One reason for this is the prevalence of third-party code. When businesses build web apps, they use code from many sources, including both commercial and open-source projects, often created and maintained by both professional and amateur developers.

    Web application creators take advantage of third-party code because it allows them to build their websites and apps quickly. For example, companies are likely to add a third-party chat widget to their site, instead of building one from scratch.

    But third-party code can leave websites vulnerable. Consider the July 2018 Magecart attack on Ticketmaster. In this data breach, hackers were able to gain access to sensitive customer information on Ticketmaster's website by compromising a third-party script used to provide chatbot functionality.

    The challenge is that this third-party functionality runs directly on the customer's browser, and the browser is built to simply render the code sent down from a web server. It assumes that all code, whether first-party or third-party, is good.

  • New company BluBracket takes on software supply chain code security
  • BluBracket scores $6.5M seed to help secure code in distributed environments

    BluBracket, a new security startup from the folks who brought you Vera, came out of stealth today and announced a $6.5 million seed investment. Unusual Ventures led the round with participation by Point72 Ventures, SignalFire and Firebolt Ventures.

Openwashing and the Latest Microsoft Fakes

Filed under
Microsoft

Devices: RasPi, MoveIt/ROS, Neuroscience Hardware Hack Chat and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • [Available now] Raspberry Pi Zero based open source checkra1n jailbreak dongle (Ra1nbox) with screen is in works

    Do you have an iPhone? Did you migrate from Android? In case you did, you can probably reminisce the first few weeks. It might have been difficult for you to get along with the whole ecosystem with limited customisation options.

    Setting the price aside, the main advantage of having an Android device is numerous options to change the default features. In order to gain an elated level of privilege, you can even go through a few steps to root the phone.

  • MoveIt, the Popular Open Source Platform For Robotic Arms, Releases ROS 2 Version

    PickNik Robotics is pleased to announce today the release of a much anticipated new version of MoveIt for use with the industry-advocated ROS 2. PickNik Robotics and its partners Intel, Amazon, Open Robotics, and many worldwide contributors to MoveIt, are excited to see this big step forward in providing next generation open source robotics. MoveIt 2 will enable many compelling advantages over its predecessor, namely faster, more reactive planning through realtime control of robot arms. The new platform version will enable more reliable robot behaviors, based on industry feedback.

  • Open-Source Neuroscience Hardware Hack Chat

    Join us for the Open-Source Neuroscience Hardware Hack Chat this week where we’ll discuss the exploration of the real final frontier, and find out what it takes to invent the tools before you get to use them.

  • Glasgow Interface Explorer open source multitool for digital electronics

    A new project soon to launch via Crowd Supplied is the Glasgow Interface Explorer, offering a highly capable and extremely flexible open source multitool for digital electronics. Created for embedded developers, reverse engineers, digital archivists, electronics hobbyists, and anyone else who wants to communicate with a wide selection of digital devices.

    The Glasgow Interface Explorer development board has been designed for “maximum reliability and minimum hassle” science creators and can be attached to most devices without the need for additional active or passive components.

  • ADLINK Industrial-Pi (I-Pi) SMARC Development Kit Features Rockchip PX30 SoC

    ADLINK Technology has just announced the Industrial-Pi (I-Pi) SMARC Development Kit to help engineers quickly design prototypes for industrial applications using peripherals and sensors.

  • Bluetera II open source development board created for motion-based IoT applications

    Bluetera II is an open hardware IoT solution powered by 9-axis motion sensors, an MCU with support for BLE 5.0, and an SDK based on Google’s Protocol Buffer technology. The small development board will be soon available to purchase via the Crowd Supply website. Offering a full stack development board using protocol buffers for motion-based IoT applications and has been created to fill the gap for an open source platform that satisfies the following requirements :

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Discover archetypes

    IBM wants to help developers identify and classify archietypes in data with the release of a new code pattern.

    Archetypes are formally defined as a pattern, or a model, of which all things of the same type are copied. According to the company, its Watson natural language understanding helps users discover archetypes in their text corpus.

    “When we read through a set of these records, our mind naturally groups the records into some collection of archetypes. For example, we may sort a song collection into easy listening, classical, rock, etc. This manual process is practical for a small number of records (e.g., a few dozen). Large systems can have millions of records, so we need an automated way to process them,” IBM wrote in a blog post.

  • Orange Egypt Using Red Hat for Horizontal Cloud Rollout

    Red Hat has been a recognizable name in the open-source community for decades. Now, Orange Egypt is utilizing the open-source provider as a basis for its horizontal cloud development. The telecommunications provider opted for the open-source solution based on reliability and cost-effectiveness. Red Hat states that Orange Egypt is the first Orange affiliate to offer management of all of its customer traffic using a software-based platform covering several sites within the geographic area. The company has invested in Red Hat technologies and already utilizes the Red Hat OpenStack Platform alongside Red Hat Ceph Storage.

  • Everything OK down there in the Oracle trench? Good. Big Red has a cloud-based data science platform for you

    After securing a lofty position in enterprise applications and databases, Oracle has fixed its eyes on data science. And though analysts have expressed doubt about whether Big Red is producing technologies new to the field, its shiny Cloud Data Science Platform might appeal to those already heavily invested in Oracle's software.

    Big Red's pitch is that it will bring cohesion to efforts in data science, allowing practitioners to "collaboratively build, train, manage and deploy machine learning models".

    Via the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Data Science service, data scientists will, the vendor said, be able to automate algorithm selection and tuning, automate predictive feature selection, evaluate models and make machine-learning models explainable to the outside world.

  • Stuffed Ep 34 – How open-source is solving the world’s biggest problems

    Open-source software has evolved to be integrated into every part of our lives. Even if we don’t necessarily know it. Proprietary software will likely become almost redundant as we move into cloud-accessible open-source options. Toby Shapshak speaks to Red Hat’s Lee Miles to delve into more accessible software.

    “When development is distributed, the risk of failure goes down.” Red Hat provides open-source solutions and software options to businesses and individuals. It focuses on high-performing Linux, cloud, container, and Kubernetes technologies — but the portfolio is growing as the software industry ‘opens’ up. The top areas where open-source software is being applied within the enterprise are security, cloud, database, and big data and analytics. Enterprises that use this software like to leverage open source for specific industry needs, like IT infrastructure modernisation, application development, and DevOps.

  • Use of proprietary software is 'plummeting', finds Red Hat report

    Red Hat's annual research report The State of Enterprise Open Source has found a big rise in the use of enterprise open-source software, and, to a lesser extent, community-based open-source solutions...

  • Report: The benefits of open-source software go beyond cost

    Open-source adoption is not slowing down within enterprises. A recent report found 95% of enterprises are taking open source seriously, with 75% of them reporting that open-source software is extremely important to their IT strategies. That number is up from 69% last year.

    The 2020 State of Enterprise Open Source by Red Hat is based off of 950 interviews conducted with IT leaders worldwide.

    “For our second annual report, we wanted to know more. With 95% of IT leaders agreeing that enterprise open source is important to their enterprise infrastructure software strategy, it’s safe to say we don’t need to ask ‘if’ anymore. We need to ask ‘why’ and ‘how,’” Jim Whitehurst, president and CEO of Red Hat, wrote in the report.

  • OKD4 Update and Roadmap with Christian Glombek

    In case you were wondering what’s going on with OKD, Red Hat’s Christian Glombek delivered an update on the project, its current state and its roadmap. Here’s the full talk in video form.

  • PipeWire 0.3 Released With Redesigned Scheduling Code To Offer JACK2-Like Performance

    PipeWire is the Red Hat engineered project aiming to offer better audio/video stream handling on Linux that integrates well with Flatpak and can optimally handle use-cases currently covered by the likes of PulseAudio and JACK. This week marked the release of PipeWire 0.3 as another big step forward for the effort.

    PipeWire 0.3 comes with redesigned scheduling mechanisms that should now offer its JACK compatibility layer performance that is comparable to JACK2.

Greenpeace, greenwash, openwash

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS
Web
  • Greenpeace takes open-source approach to finish web transformation

    Greenpeace is working with open source software firm Red Hat to scale and revamp its grassroots engagement platform, Planet 4.

    The project marks a complete re-design of Greenpeace.org’s backend content management systems (CMS), which are now designed to put content on the web and provide a vehicle for driving grassroots environmental action.

  • Greenpeace turns to Red Hat to scale its “Planet 4” global engagement platform
  • Greenpeace turns to open source to finish its web transformation

    In 2016, Greenpeace International decided to try a new way of stimulating grass-level environmental activity via something it called ‘Planet 4’ - a global content management system (CMS) it defined as its new engagement platform. In its original mission statement, it also outlined its expectations for the tool: that it would foster more engagement “when we present ourselves to our supporters, and our potential supporters, through a clear representation of our values with a clear proposition for why we exist, how people can become change agents through our work, and what they can do with us right now”.

Fast download managers for Linux, Alternative to IDM

Filed under
Software

Download managers are great. They make the downloading process a lot easier and faster. However, the most popular download manager is IDM which is only available to Window. That is why in this quick guide, You will learn about the fast download managers for Linux that are alternative to IDM and even better in some cases.

Having a fast download manager in your system is very essential as we tend to download files from the internet and the default downloader that we have got with the browsers. These download managers are not very efficient and do not provide any modern needed features.

Here I have compiled a list of best and fast download managers for Linux. Let’s get started with the first one.

Read more

Is open source software licensing broken?

Filed under
OSS

Practices and expectations that one may have developed in working with conventional software licensing may lead to frustration when confronting open source software. The modest request, "Please, just show me the license" may be met with an unsatisfying response. While sometimes the response is very simple, often, the license information for open source software is more complicated and does not match the expectations set by conventional software licensing.

What's up? Is open source software licensing broken? No. Differences, not just in the type of license terms, but in how the software is developed, lead to differences in how software license information is conveyed. In part, this results from tradeoffs between lawyer convenience and developer convenience.

Read more

MauiKit Aims to Bring Apps That Can Run on Linux and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

Creating the same apps and software for different platforms is not an easy task for the developers. To make an app run on desktops, developers need to write a source code. However, to make the same app run on mobile devices, the developers have to write a different source code. With the new MauiKit, developers would be able to build convergent apps, that can run on both platforms with the same source code.

Read more

Games: Steam on Focal Fossa, osu! Comes to GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Canonical need a little testing hand for a newer Steam package on Ubuntu 20.04

    With Ubuntu 20.04 "Focal Fossa" being released in the next few months, the team over at Canonical are looking for a little help testing their updated Steam package.

    To be clear, this is only for the 20.04 release, they're not looking for feedback for earlier versions of Ubuntu.

    It's not a drastic change to the Steam package with it pulling in an update from Debian, but this newer build does have updated udev rules for some devices. Canonical also did some of their own tweaks for NVIDIA due to the differences between Ubuntu and Debian.

    You will need to use a temporary PPA which will be removed when the test is over, found over here. They need people to try clean installs without any Steam, upgrading from an existing Steam install and purge removals of the steam package. Additionally, testing with a Steam Controller and supported VR devices would help them too.

  • Popular free rhythm game 'osu!' now provides a Linux build with releases

    osu!, going under the current development name of osu!lazer is a very popular free rhythm game and they're now doing official builds for Linux gamers.

    It's actually inspired by an older game called Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan, which was released in 2005 for the Nintendo DS. osu! was originally only available for Windows, then ported to macOS and eventually they started work on osu!lazer as an open source remake of the original client to eventually replace it. There's been various unofficial builds out there, since it's open source and up on GitHub but they're now making Linux a bit more official.

Software: QOwnNotes, Searchmonkey, Remote Touchpad and Google Maps Plugins for WordPress

Filed under
Software
  • Norbert Preining: QOwnNotes for Debian

    QOwnNotes is a cross-platform plain text and markdown note taking application. By itself, it wouldn’t be something to talk about, we have vim and emacs and everything in between. But QOwnNotes integrates nicely with the Notes application from NextCloud and OwnCloud, as well as providing useful integration with NextCloud like old version of notes, access to deleted files, watching changes, etc.

  • Searchmonkey – A powerful desktop search app for Linux

    In our day to day activities, we need to search for specific files in our Linux systems. These can be documents, texts, and even multimedia data including video and audio files. 

    Linux comes with a powerful command-line tool (Terminal), that enables users to search for data and text using various command-line arguments. One advantage of using the Terminal is it supports the use of regular expressions and scripting.

    Having said that, not everyone is well-versed with the many Linux commands; this brings forth the demand for having an interactive and reliable Graphical User Interface. One of such powerful tools is the Searchmonkey application.

  • Remote Touchpad: Control Mouse & Keyboard from Your Phone

    Remote Touchpad is an open-source utility allows to remote control the mouse and keyboard connected to your computer from the web browser of a smartphone or any other device with a touchscreen.

    Remote Touchpad supports Flatpak’s RemoteDesktop portal (experimental), Windows and X11.

    Simply run the utility on your machine. It outputs an URL along with QR code in a terminal window. To take control open the displayed URL or scan the QR code in your phone.

  • Top 10 Best Google Maps Plugin for WordPress (2020)

    A touch webpage is far more of use with an internet map. This guide shows the top 10 best Google maps plugin for WordPress. A traveling site will be that more pleasure for those who (and also you subscribers ) may view in a glance most of the locations you have already been. You will find a lot of motives to incorporate maps onto your own WordPress website, regardless of what your explanation is that you have to have a simple and effective means to perform nothing but that.

FSCRYPT, AMD and Broadcom Work on Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux's FSCRYPT Working On Encryption + Case-Insensitive Support

    FSCRYPT as the file-system encryption framework for the Linux kernel and is currently wired up for EXT4, F2FS, and UBIFS to offer native encryption capabilities is currently seeing improvements so the separate casefolding (case-insensitive) file/folder support can work on encrypted directories.

  • A Few More Linux Kernel Patches Floated This Week For AMD Family 19h (Zen 3)

    Going back to the start of 2020 we've been seeing a few patches here and there around AMD Family 19h, almost certainly Zen 3. That patch work has continued with a few more bits out this week while hopefully more bring-up is on the horizon ahead of the Linux 5.7 merge window opening in just over one month's time.

    Like the earlier Family 19h EDAC bring-up, this week's work isn't too juicy besides it being refreshing to see AMD punctually getting out Linux kernel patches for forthcoming hardware. The patches this week involve a few additions to AMD's perf subsystem code around the uncore bits. No enticing details of Family 19h are revealed but just shifting code around for supporting the L3 thread mask for the forthcoming CPUs and also the L3 PMU.

  • Broadcom Bringing Up Linux Support For VK Accelerators

    Broadcom developers have been recently volleying open-source Linux driver patches for enabling their "VK Accelerators" on the platform.

    Broadcom VK Accelerators are PCI Express offload engines for supporting video transcoding on multiple streams in parallel. These VK Accelerators offer various video offload processing features and are exposed to user-space via specialized /dev/bcm-vk.X devices. We haven't yet seen user-space patches to see if Broadcom intends to support any of the common APIs or will be developing their own customized solution.

    This Broadcom VK offload engine relies upon seemingly closed-source firmware files to be loaded for running the logic on these accelerators.

Syndicate content