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Thursday, 13 Aug 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Video/Audio: Feren OS 2020.07, Curl, Command Line Heroes and More Red Hat

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Feren OS 2020.07 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Feren OS 2020.07. Enjoy!

  • Daniel Stenberg: Video: Landing code in curl

    A few hours ago I ended my webinar on how to get your code contribution merged into curl.

  • Command Line Heroes - Season 5, episode 3: What Kind of Coder Will You Become?

    The 10x Coder is often positioned as a mythical developer who can always save the day. Saron Yitbarek and Clive Thompson investigate how much of that myth is grounded in truth.

  • How Quarkus fits into the Red Hat Runtimes formula

    There are plenty of new features to talk about in the world of Red Hat Runtimes. When I recently had the chance to speak with James Falkner, technical product manager for Red Hat Runtimes, he zeroed in on the Quarkus framework, or more specifically, the Red Hat branded build of Quarkus.

  • What the Dev?

    This week, we spoke to Eric Schabell, the portfolio architect director at Red Hat, about Agile integration. A lot of enterprises are moving in the direction of Agile teams all with an eye on the digital transformation story where they're headed towards delivering things in a cloud native fashion. You'll hear some of the best ways in which to achieve that Agile integration.

Fedora: Kernel Testing, OpenShift OKD and Project Intern

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Contribute at the Fedora Test Week for Kernel 5.8

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.8. This version was just recently released and will arrive soon in Fedora. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Monday, August 17, 2020 through Monday, August 24, 2020. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

  • OpenShift OKD on Fedora CoreOS on DigitalOcean Part 1: Deployment

    This blog post is the second in a series that illustrates how to set up an OpenShift OKD cluster on DigitalOcean. The first post in the series covered some background information and pre-requisites needed for deploying a cluster. At this point you should have chosen the domain for your cluster, set up your registrar to point to DigitalOcean nameservers, installed all necessary software (doctl, openshift-install, oc, aws cli, etc..), and configured appropriate credentials in your environment (DIGITALOCEAN_ACCESS_TOKEN, AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID, AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY).

  • Closing in on the end of the Summer

    Can you believe we’re two weeks through August already! And I’m so happy that my internship has been extended so last week isn’t my last week, even if it is the last full time week for awhile.

Linux Foundation Broadens Relationship With Surveillance

Filed under
Linux
  • Facebook joins The Linux Foundation as a platinum member

    Most web-based companies are built on Linux and open-source software. Two-billion member social network Facebook is no different. For years, Facebook has not only relied on open-source, it's been an active contributor to major open-source projects. These include the React JavaScript library; the Open Compute Project, which open sources data-center hardware; and Linux's cGroup2 container software. Now Facebook is joining The Linux Foundation membership at the Platinum level.

    [...]

    While Facebook has been criticized for how it deals with privacy and politics, it has impeccable open-source credentials. It was already the lead contributor of many Linux Foundation-hosted projects, such as Presto, GraphQL, Osquery, and ONNX. The company also employs many Linux kernel key developers and maintainers.

  • Amundsen Joins LF AI as New Incubation Project

    LF AI Foundation (LF AI), the organization building an ecosystem to sustain open source innovation in artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), and deep learning (DL), today is announcing Amundsen as its latest Incubation Project.

  • LF AI Accepts Amundsen as Incubation Project

    The Amundsen data discovery project has joined the LF AI as an incubation project.

    Amundsen is a data discovery and metadata engine aiming to improve the productivity of data analysts, data scientists and engineers by indexing data resources. “Think of it as Google search for data,” the LF AI announcement said.

Graphics: Mesa 20.2 RC2 and DXVK 1.7.1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 20.2.0-rc2
    Hi list,
    
    Available today is mesa 20.2.0-rc2. This is the second release candidate for
    the 20.2 release. Currently our open to close ratio on blocking bugs is looking
    really good. This release is dominated by changes to radeonsi, radv, and aco,
    with a few additional changes sneaking in for freedreno, meson,  etnaviv,
    st/mesa, anv, and a few utility fixes.
    
    Dylan
    
    
  • Mesa 20.2-RC2 Released With Many Fixes For RadeonSI + RADV Drivers

    The second weekly release candidate of the forthcoming Mesa 20.2 is now available for testing.

    Mesa 20.2 is aiming for release around the end of August or early September depending upon how the bug situation plays out. This quarterly feature release to Mesa3D brings many new Vulkan extensions, the RADV driver using ACO by default, initial support for Navi 2 GPUs, initial support for Intel Rocket Lake and DG1, OpenGL 4.3 for LLVMpipe, and much more as outlined in last week's article.

  • DXVK 1.7.1 Released With Many Game Fixes For Direct3D Over Vulkan

    It's been nearly three months without a new DXVK release for mapping Direct3D 9/10/11 atop the Vulkan API while finally today there is a big feature release out.

    DXVK 1.7.1 was released a few minutes ago as the first update since May. While the version number isn't significant, this version does have many changes.

  • Direct3D to Vulkan translation layer DXVK 1.7.1 is out, lots of game fixes

    After a few months since 1.7 went out, DXVK 1.7.1 is now live to further improve Direct3D to Vulkan translation. This is the project that helps to power Proton, the compatibility layer for Steam Play.

    This release adds support for newer Vulkan extensions, fixes bugs and has new GPU driver requirements. On the driver side, the VK_EXT_transform_feedback extension is now required which has been supported in drivers on Linux since late 2018 / early 2019. Specifically you will need at least NVIDIA 415.22 and for AMD / Intel it looks like Mesa 19 covers both.

Devices/Embedded: Raspberry Pi and Android Devices

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

  • Indoor air quality HAT for Raspberry Pi boasts high-res TVOC sensor

    Avnet’s $49.95 “Renesas ZMOD4410 Indoor Air Quality HAT for Raspberry Pi” can be used to measure volatile organic compounds, humidity, and temperature, as well as estimate carbon dioxide levels.

    Avnet has launched a Renesas ZMOD4410 Indoor Air Quality HAT for Raspberry Pi (AES-RHSEN-ZM44-G) that joins other indoor air quality measurement add-ons for the Pi including Metriful’s $44.50 Sense module and Pimoroni’s $57 Enviro+ pHAT. The ZMOD4410 HAT lacks some of the extras of those boards, but appears to offer a higher quality total volatile organic compound (TVOC) sensor with its Renesas ZMOD4410, which offers resolution ranging from parts-per-billion to parts-per-million.

  • Tiny module and dev kit run RT Linux on STM32MP1

    Exor’s 25.4 x 25.4mm, extended temp “NanoSOM nS02” module runs real-time Linux and its XPlatform industrial IoT software on a soldered, 800MHz STM32MP157 with up to 1GB DDR3L and 32GB eMMC. An “OpenHMI nS02” dev kit with 5-inch touchscreen is optional.

    Italian embedded technology firm Exor Embedded has launched a NanoSOM nS02 module that runs real-time Linux on the new 800MHz version of ST’s dual-core, Cortex-A7 based STM32MP157. As with the recent, Apollo Lake based, FPGA-enabled GigaSOM GS01 module, Exor announced the product with Arrow, which will be distributing the module and an OpenHMI nS02 Development Kit (see farther below).

  • Zidoo Z10 Pro & Z9X Realtek RTD1619DR 4K Android Media Players Launched for $229 and up

    We previously wrote about some upcoming Realtek RTD1619 media players targeting the videophone and audiophile crowd, and expected them to launch very soon with models from Zidoo and Dune HD.

    Zidoo has now launched two models with the awaited Zidoo Z9X and a new, higher-end Zidoo Z10 Pro which can be purchased on Aliexpress for respectively $229 and $349 with free shipping.

  • Snapdragon 626 Powered Rugged Tablet Comes with NFC, RFID and Barcode Readers

    Estone Technology has launched another rugged tablet with UA-80 IP-67 waterproof rated, and MIL-STD-810G compliant rugged Android tablet powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 626 mobile platform driving an 8″ capacitive touchscreen display.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Announcing the new Jupyter Book

    Jupyter Book is an open source project for building beautiful, publication-quality books, websites, and documents from source material that contains computational content. With this post, we’re happy to announce that Jupyter Book has been re-written from the ground up, making it easier to install, faster to use, and able to create more complex publishing content in your books. It is now supported by the Executable Book Project, an open community that builds open source tools for interactive and executable documents in the Jupyter ecosystem and beyond.

  • Holdgraf: Announcing the new Jupyter Book

    On the Jupyter blog, Chris Holdgraf announces a rewrite of the Jupyter Book project. LWN looked at Jupyter and its interactive notebooks for Python and other languages back in 2018; Jupyter Book extends the notebook idea.

  • EuroPython 2020: Live Stream Recordings available

    We’re happy to announce the public availability of the live stream recordings from EuroPython 2020. They were already available to all conference attendees since the sprint days.

  • Learn Any Programming Language with This Learning Plan

    All it takes to master any programming language is the right learning plan.

    If you know anything about programming you should be aware that often you can’t tell whether what you are doing is wrong until it’s too late. That’s what makes programming a frustrating skill to master — long hours doing the wrong things.

    But hey, whether you want to make programming your full-time job or just a hobby, you can always make the learning curve less steep. The secret to getting it right with coding is this: have a learning plan! While the plan will not do the hard lifting for you, it will definitely provide the much-needed elbow grease to keep you grounded and focused as you learn programming.

  • Deploying Django to AWS ECS with Terraform

    In this tutorial, we'll look at how to deploy a Django app to AWS ECS with Terraform.

  • Matt Layman: Rendering Calendars - Building SaaS #68

    In this episode, I worked on rendering a calendar of important events in a school year. We built out the appropriate data structures, and I wrote some new model methods and added tests. On the last stream, I created a new model to track breaks in the school year. The app now shows the calendar for the school year, and I want to display the breaks on the calendar. Before digging too far into the code, I provided my thoughts about using Docker for development from a question that came from the chat.

Software in the Command Line

Filed under
Software

  • Readability CLI: I Don't Want A GUI Just To Read An Article

    The web is big and bloated and that isn't going to change any time soon so luckily for us some people are working on ways that can take the web and strip out most of the garbage that you don't need to allow people to more easily use it from a terminal web browser or with a screen reader. One such tool is Readability CLI which interacts with Mozilla's Readability Library to bring you a really comfy terminal web viewing experience which works amazingly for reading articles.

  • Rainbow Text, ASCII Art and More: Customize Your Linux Terminal

    The Linux terminal, sometimes referred to as the command line or the “shell” is a simple yet powerful way to interact with the computer. Commands are typed into the terminal, and their output is displayed immediately to the terminal.

    From the Linux terminal we can create users, make network connections and download files. Despite all of this power, the terminal is not as “friendly” as a modern desktop. How can the terminal be made a little friendlier? By customizing the Linux terminal with rainbows, art and handy information such as CPU temperature, IP address and the latest weather.

  • Best Command Line Music Players For Linux

    List Of The Best Command Line Music Players For Linux Operating Systems

    What will be more fun than playing music in the terminal or command-line interface in Linux based operating systems?. In this post, we will list out the best command-line music players for Linux based operating systems.

Linux vs. Windows: It's a matter of perspective

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

I was hired by another company to do a video series on a particular piece of software. I thought, "No problem! I've used the software on other platforms, this will be a cake walk." And no, the software in question wasn't Cakewalk.

All I had to do was install a screen-recording application on Windows 10, and I'd be set for liftoff (no, the software in question wasn't Liftoff).

However, Windows 10 had something to say about that proposition.

At first, I thought, "I'll use the built-in screen recording app." Nope. That's only for games.

Then I thought, "I'll install the same tool I use on Linux (to great effect)." Nope. Not available for Windows.

Then I thought, "I'll check the Windows App Store (or whatever that abomination is called)."

Bingo. I found five or so different titles to try.

First one failed to launch.
Second one failed to record.
Third one crashed two minutes into the session.
Fourth one was a joke.
Fifth one wouldn't install.

I was at a loss. I had a deadline, and things weren't looking so good. It wasn't until I remembered that I'd used OBS Studio once upon a time and knew I could get a screen recording with that. So, I installed the tool, took the time to set it up, and recorded the session.

Read more

Ubuntu 18.04.5 LTS Released with Linux Kernel 5.4 LTS from Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 18.04.5 LTS comes six months after the Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS point release and two and a half years after the release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), which is normally supported until April 2023, though the end of life is planned for April 2028 due to Canonical’s new 10-year support policy.

The good news for those still using Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is that Ubuntu 18.04.5 LTS brings yet another kernel and graphics stacks bump. This time, it runs the Linux 5.4 LTS kernel and Mesa 20.0.8 graphics stack from Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa).

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Call for testing: improved WiFi via iwd

    This is Lukas Märdian, a software engineer for the Ubuntu Foundations team. I have been evaluating the use of iwd [0] as a wireless daemon in Ubuntu. iwd (iNet Wireless Daemon) is a modern, up-and-coming wireless daemon for Linux. It is written by Intel and aims to replace wpa_supplicant for potential benefits in...

  • Ubuntu needs feedback on some possible major WiFi changes

    Are you an Ubuntu Linux user on either Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy - unreleased, in testing) or 20.04 LTS (Focal - the current release)? The Ubuntu Foundations Team needs feedback on some possible major WiFi changes.

    They're looking at replacing the currently widely used wpa_supplicant for iwd (iNet Wireless Daemon) a more modern upcoming solution which was written by Intel. According to Lukas Märdian, a software engineer for the Ubuntu Foundations Team it would give these benefits...

  • Norbert Preining: KDE/Plasma Status Update 2020-08-13

    Short status update on my KDE/Plasma packages for Debian sid and testing:

    Frameworks update to 5.73
    Apps are now available from the main archive in the same upstream version and superseeding my packages
    New architecture: aarch64

  • Unity Game Engine Planning For Many Improvements In 2021

    The popular, cross-platform Unity game engine is planning for a very exciting 2021.

  • What is PostgreSQL, and why do developers love it?

    PostgreSQL solves the problem of extensibility, in complex cloud environments. This statement is often thrown around, but why is it true? Should next-generation cloud-infrastructure still use it? Is it still relevant in an era of big data?

    So far, we’ve looked at the benefits and challenges of Kafka and Cassandra. Let’s look at the main benefits, challenges and use cases of it, and the easiest way to get PostgreSQL deployed and running in production.

  • Study of open source tools for unified communication and collaboration targets Finnish municipalities

    Finland’s Centre for Open Source Solutions (COSS) is about to start a study into the use of open source software solutions for unified communication and collaboration. The centre says that smaller municipalities have expressed a need for a comprehensive ‘cost-effective and IT vendor-neutral’ software solution.

  • Open Source Collaboration is a Global Endeavor

    The Linux Foundation would like to reiterate its statements and analysis of the application of US Export Control regulations to public, open collaboration projects (e.g. open source software, open standards, open hardware, and open data) and the importance of open collaboration in the successful, global development of the world’s most important technologies. At this time, we have no information to believe recent Executive Orders regarding WeChat and TikTok will impact our analysis for open source collaboration. Our members and other participants in our project communities, which span many countries, are clear that they desire to continue collaborating with their peers around the world.

  • Introduction to Web Hosting Bandwidth

    There is no such thing as unlimited bandwidth. Many service providers use the term as nothing but marketing strategy to lure potential buyers. Each time a visitor accesses any content of any website in the server, the data transfer consumes a portion of the allocated bandwidth. There is always a possibility that a sudden spike in visitors utilizes all the available bandwidth, resulting in slow loading and poor performance in general. Service providers say “unlimited” only because they know that under normal circumstances the server’s traffic will never use all the available resources.

    The most suitable web hosting plan (and bandwidth) for you is the package that suits your current needs. You don’t have to pay for the most expensive plan if you only have one or two websites with relatively low page numbers each. Unless you have a massive website with hundreds of pages, multimedia files, and thousands of visitors on a daily basis, the most expensive package from any service provider will most likely be a waste of money.

  • Trilio and Canonical extend partnership to enable data protection for Charmed OpenStack

    Canonical and Trilio, announced today an extension of their partnership to include TrilioVault data protection capabilities with Charmed OpenStack as a tested and validated joint solution. TrilioVault for OpenStack is a cloud-native, application-centric data protection platform that was designed to provide native backup and recovery for private cloud workloads.

  • Combination of A Cloud Guru and Linux Academy creates the most comprehensive, hands-on, and effective cloud learning solution for individual learners and enterprise teams

    Today A Cloud Guru (ACG), the leader in modern tech skills development, announced the launch of its new flagship ACG platform, forming the most comprehensive, hands-on, and effective skills development platform for cloud learning in the world. Following the December 2019 acquisition of Linux Academy (LA), the new platform combines the strengths and benefits of both ACG and LA products to offer an unparalleled solution for upleveling cloud skills among individual learners and enterprise teams.

  • Using Open Source in Your Business? Beware the Fine Print [Ed: It says about GPL: "This is the most notorious of open source licenses." In whose eyes? Microsoft's? Lawyers'?]

    Use of open source exposes the source code – An example of a particularly limiting license is the GNU General Public License (GPL for short). This is the most notorious of open source licenses. GPL permits the distribution of software using a GPL component, while stipulating that such derivative software be distributed under the same license, i.e., it requires the public release of the new software’s source code. This requirement could be the death knell for a tech company, as the exposure of any part of its source code may cause it to lose its competitive edge. Unfortunately, early-stage developers and startups often neglect to read the licenses or misconstrue the fine print, or they fail to turn to legal advisors to pinpoint the red flags. There are consequences to this, which could require amendments and many development hours at a later stage when the issue arises.

    [...]

    Spotting a GPL as part of a company’s proprietary software could have significant implications in terms of risk assessment and valuation of the target company.

  • JSHint is Now Free Software after Updating License to MIT Expat

    The world of open source tooling has expanded to welcome JSHint, as the project’s maintainers have finally completed the necessary work to adopt the MIT Expat license. Previously, the JavaScript linter’s code was partially published under the JSON license, with an additional seemingly innocuous clause that stated: “The Software shall be used for Good, not Evil.” This clause prevented it from being recognized by FSF as a free software license and similarly was not recognized as open source by the Open Source Initiative.

Linux Foundation for Spying and Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

  • The Linux Basis Needs Open-Supply Tech to Tackle Future Pandemics [Ed: Surveillance]

    The Linux Basis, which helps open-source innovation in blockchain tech, launched the Linux Basis Public Well being Initiative (LFPHI) on the finish of July. The LFPHI’s purpose is to advertise using open supply by public well being authorities, which will be scrutinized by anybody, to combat not simply COVID-19 however future pandemics as effectively.

    Among the many seven core members of the LFPHI are Tencent, Cisco and IBM. The initiative is supporting two publicity notification initiatives, “COVID Shield” and “COVID Green,” with the intention of bettering interoperability throughout initiatives in several jurisdictions.

  • Facebook’s Long History of Open Source Investments Deepens with Platinum-level Linux Foundation Membership [Ed: The Linux Foundation is a voice for malicious surveillance companies that need openwashing]

    From its efforts to reshape computing through open source to its aggressive push to increase internet connectivity around the world, Facebook is a leader in open innovation. Perhaps more important today than ever, Facebook’s focus on democratizing access to technology enhances opportunity and scale for individuals and businesses alike. That’s why we’re so excited to announce the company is joining the Linux Foundation at the highest level.

    Facebook’s sponsorship of open innovation through the Linux Foundation will help support the largest shared technology investment in history with an estimated $16B in development costs of the world’s 100+ leading open source projects and supports those project communities through governance, events and education. The company is also already the lead contributor of many Linux Foundation-hosted projects, such as Presto, GraphQL, Osquery and ONNX. It has been an active participant in Linux kernel development, employing key developers and maintainers across major kernel subsystems.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (linux-4.19, linux-latest-4.19, and openjdk-8) and Fedora (ark and hylafax+).

  • Google to Microsoft: Nice Windows 10 patch – but it's incomplete

    Google Project Zero (GPZ) is refusing to give Microsoft further extensions on disclosing a Windows 10 authentication bug because it says a patch Microsoft delivered in the August 2020 Patch Tuesday update is incomplete.

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, Self-Hosted and BSD Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Infusing your UX writing with brand personality

    Brand can often be overused as a content term, but it can be overlooked as a content strategy. Plenty of folks rave about building their brand, promoting their company brand, creating brand recognition, and so on. But how many of those people actually consider the vast array of content channels that should be on-brand?

    Yes, blog posts and other marketing collateral should reflect your brand, but you might be overlooking something else: your product’s user interface (UI). I’m not specifically referring to the colors, logos, and icons (although those brand elements are extremely important). I’m referring to the words in the UI. These words are usually called "microcopy" or "UX copy," and the act of creating them is called "UX writing."

  • Open Data Hub 0.7 adds support for Kubeflow 1.0

    Open Data Hub (ODH) is a blueprint for building an AI-as-a-Service (AIaaS) platform on Red Hat OpenShift 4. Version 0.7 of Open Data Hub includes support for deploying Kubeflow 1.0 on OpenShift, as well as increased component testing on the OpenShift continuous integration (CI) system. This article explores the recent updates.

  • Sysadmin careers: How my team distributes work over holidays, nights, and weekends

    Well, I thought this would be an interesting topic to explore because I'm working in a team most sysadmins probably dream of—we don't work over holidays, nights, or weekends. Our mode of operation dictates that everyone works eight hours a day from Monday to Friday. Office hours are between 6:45 am and 8:00 pm, but most of us keep to the typical workday schedule of 8:00 am to 5:00 pm with an hour for lunch.

    That means there is no operations team present onsite or even on call during nights, weekends, and holidays. (Full disclosure—we do put in an extra hour here and there, but only for some of the bigger migrations, e.g., a new SAN goes live, or we do a migration of a whole mail system including mailboxes and calendars. Some guys will briefly check-in at night or during the weekend to see if the jobs are still running. But, as a rule, other typical maintenance tasks like release upgrades take place during the usual office hours).

    Sounds awesome, right? Unfortunately, we're not hiring at the moment.

    When I tell people that we don't have to work on weekends and holidays and don't have to be on call at night, they usually ask, "but what do you do when something breaks?"

    So we work 8x5, but our clients need our services to be available 24x7. To make that possible, you have to consider a few important things when it comes to product selection and service design.

  • Boosting manufacturing efficiency and product quality with AI/ML, edge computing and Kubernetes

    The manufacturing industry has consistently used technology to fuel innovation, production optimization and operations. Now, with the combination of edge computing and AI/ML, manufacturers can benefit from bringing processing power closer to data that, when put into action faster, can help to proactively discover of potential errors at the assembly line, help improve product quality, and even reduce potential downtime through predictive maintenance and in the unlikely event of a drop in communications with a central/core site, individual manufacturing plants can continue to operate.

    [...]

    To achieve this manufacturing vision, along with the continued digitalization of factories, manufacturers must now take a hard look at their operations and technology to meet these new opportunities. It requires factory systems to mirror the best practices of a modern IT environment based on containers, Kubernetes, agile development, AI/ML and automation. All of these technologies, coincidentally, are components of open hybrid cloud, an IT footprint that can be used to accommodate these manufacturing technologies, from the edge of the network to the factory floor.

  • Michel Alexandre Salim: Breaking out of walled gardens

    I have been progressively getting more and more dissatisfied with the grip Big Tech firms have over our collective lives, and have been gradually pruning my use of proprietary technologies over the past months.

  • Red Hat Offers Certification Exams Online in Response to COVID-19

    With travel and in-person gatherings made difficult by COVID-19, Red Hat is now offering certification testing online - and using a unique solution to deter cheating.

Devices With Linux, Mostly Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Terminal Zero: Building the Ultimate Raspberry Pi Zero Computer

    The new edition has no keyboard in favor of a touchscreen interface. The case is custom designed and no only has a huge selection of ports to access but also additional buttons. The unit is completely wireless, using a LiPo battery for power. There's a small speaker inside but you can also use headphones via a 3.5mm jack.

  • Will This Speed up Your Raspberry Pi Browsing by up to 1200%?

    Puffin manages these incredible speeds because the content is rendered remotely on their encrypted cloud servers. A JavaScript engine is used to pre-process and compress web pages before they arrive at your screen. This can be interpreted as a proxy server by some sites, and may affect the content that is available to you.

  • Odroid H2 as ventilator cooling ventilation airmachine

    finally summer and climate change have both reached Europe and had several weeks of 30 C straight…

    without ventilation, anything above 30 is just “too much to think” (so maybe the brain CPU also would need active cooling?)

    of course the user could buy a fan online… or try to use CPU fans to do the job

  • Track your punches with Raspberry Pi
  • Garage Minder

    A Raspberry Pi Zero W is used to open and close the garage door. I did not have a convenient outlet to plug in a power supply for the Pi. So my Pi gets its power from the existing garage opener control wiring for the wall button. Typically, there is 24 volt AC available here, though it may be a lower voltage in older openers. A Buck converter down-regulates this voltage to 5 v DC. A battery allows the Pi to continue when the wall button is momentarily pressed, and the power is shorted out. We need two diodes so that the forward drop (1.4v) stops the 6v battery from continuously discharging into the 5v power supply. The battery is barely used, so it should last for a long time. If an outlet is conveniently available, then a regular 5v micro USB charger can be used.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Go filesystems and file embedding

    The Go team has recently published several draft designs that propose changes to the language, standard library, and tooling: we covered the one on generics back in June. Last week, the Go team published two draft designs related to files: one for a new read-only filesystem interface, which specifies a minimal interface for filesystems, and a second design that proposes a standard way to embed files into Go binaries (by building on the filesystem interface). Embedding files into Go binaries is intended to simplify deployments by including all of a program's resources in a single binary; the filesystem interface design was drafted primarily as a building block for that. There has been a lot of discussion on the draft designs, which has been generally positive, but there are some significant concerns.

    Russ Cox, technical lead of the Go team, and Rob Pike, one of the creators of Go, are the authors of the design for the filesystem interface. Cox is also an author of the design for file embedding along with longtime Go contributor Brad Fitzpatrick. Additionally, Cox created YouTube video presentations of each design for those who prefer that format (the filesystem interface video and the file-embedding video).

  • a Piece of Note on Unicode Encoding for CJK characters (with my simple Caesar encoding script)
  • Plasmoid with C++

    So the goal is pretty simple, and all I have to do is to find a way to share information from KClock to the plasmoid. However the solution isn’t that trivia. As it turned out, DBus is perferred for IPC(Inter-process communication). Before start working on plasmoid, I need to expose some of the class of KClock to DBus first. Since KClock is built upon Qt, I choose to using Q-DBus as it will save a lot of effort than using low level interface. Now the problem is - I don’t know how to use Q-DBus. As usual, I went to the Qt documentation and to my surprise, it spent most content to describe the concept of DBus and compared to Qt’s signal/slot machinism. Although useful as it is, lack of examples meaning I still didn’t know how I can use it in my code. Thankfully, KDE has its own tutorial about DBus and it provides multiple examples. You can find it here.

  • How to use printf to format output

    When I started learning Unix, I was introduced to the echo command pretty early in the process. Likewise, my initial Python lesson involved the print function. Picking up C++ and Java introduced me to cout and systemout. It seemed every language proudly had a convenient one-line method of producing output and advertised it like it was going out of style.

  • Ceph – the practical storage solution for companies of all sizes

    Ceph was conceived by Sage A. Weil, who developed it while writing his dissertation and published it in 2006. He then led the project with his company Intank Storage. In 2014, the company was acquired by RedHat, with Weil staying on as the chief architect, in charge of the software’s development.

    Ceph only works on Linux systems, for example CentOS, Debian, Fedora, RedHat/RHEL, OpenSUSE, and Ubuntu. Accessing the software through Windows systems cannot be done directly, but is possible through the use of iSCSI (Internet Small Computer System Interface). As such, Ceph is particularly suitable for use in data centers that make their storage space available over servers, and for cloud solutions of any kind that use software to provide storage.

    We have complied a list of the most important features of Ceph: [...]

  • "Structural pattern matching" for Python, part 1

    We last looked at the idea of a Python "match" or "switch" statement back in 2016, but it is something that has been circulating in the Python community both before and since that coverage. In June it was raised again, with a Python Enhancement Proposal (PEP) supporting it: PEP 622 ("Structural Pattern Matching"). As that title would imply, the match statement proposed in the PEP is actually a pattern-matching construct with many uses. While it may superficially resemble the C switch statement, a Python match would do far more than simply choose a chunk of code to execute based on the value of an expression.

  • Federico Mena-Quintero: "Rust does not have a stable ABI"

    These are extremely valid concerns to be addressed by people like myself who propose that chunks of infrastructural libraries should be done in Rust.

    So, let's begin.

    The first part of this article is a super-quick introduction to shared libraries and how Linux distributions use them. If you already know those things, feel free to skip to the "Rust does not have a stable ABI" section.

Software: FreeCAD, Text Editors, Man-Pages and Kiwi TCMS

Filed under
Software

  • Checking out FreeCAD

    Our look at running a CNC milling machine using open-source software led me to another tool worth looking at: FreeCAD. I wasn't previously familiar with the program, so I decided to check it out. In this article I will walk through my experiences with using FreeCAD for the first time to do a variety of CNC-related tasks I normally would have used a commercial product for. I had varying degrees of success in my endeavors, but in the end came away with a positive opinion.

    FreeCAD is an LGPL v2+ licensed CAD and CAM program written in Python and C++. The first release of the project was in 2002, and its last stable version 0.18.4 was released in October 2019. The project's GitHub page indicates that it has 271 contributors with new commits happening often (generally more than 50 a week). Beyond code contributions, FreeCAD has a welcoming community with active forums to answer any questions users might have along the way. FreeCAD is designed to be cross-platform, supporting Linux, macOS, and Windows, with binary releases provided by the OS-independent package and environment management system Conda.

    I decided to take on a relatively simple CNC project: milling a new street-address sign for my home. The plan called for a 700mm x 150mm sign, and I decided to mill it out of a plank of maple wood. The design I have in mind is pretty straightforward, so it should be a great way to put FreeCAD through a test on a real project. I also looked at using FreeCAD for taking existing models that are available online with an open license and importing them for milling (in this case, a wooden spoon).

    It is worth noting that before this effort I had never used FreeCAD before. My personal goal is to become fluent enough with FreeCAD that I can replace my dependence on the commercial CAD software I presently use in my design work. The goal of this article, however, is to share what my experience with FreeCAD was, and provide a glimpse of FreeCAD from the perspective of an inexperienced user.

  •         

  • 9 Best Emacs-Like Text Editors

    Over the years, one of the most emotive areas in the world of Linux is the choice of text editor. Some people are strong advocates of Vim, others prefer Emacs. And there’s tons of other text editors available with strong backing. Having robust opinions is the way the land lies in Linux.

    Emacs has a long and revered history. The original program was written in 1976 as a set of macros for an existing text editor called TECO. Emacs originally was an acronym for Editor MACroS, unifying the many TECO command sets and key bindings. TECO is both a character-oriented text editor and an interpreted programming language for text manipulation.

    Emacs has come a long way since 1976. It offers a robust Lisp interpreter that is hugely extensible and hackable. It brought to light lots of novel concepts such as an infinite clipboard, tree-based exploration of history, a reverse variable search, structural editing of code, and recursive editing that let you stop what you are doing, perform other edits, and then revert back to the original task.

    Emacs is an incremental programming environment, a mutable environment that provides functionality without applications.

  •        

  • Michael Kerrisk (manpages): man-pages-5.08 is released

    I've released man-pages-5.08. The release tarball is available on kernel.org. The browsable online pages can be found on man7.org. The Git repository for man-pages is available on kernel.org.

    This release resulted from patches, bug reports, reviews, and comments from more than 30 contributors. The release includes more than 190 commits that change around 340 pages.

  • QGIS has chosen Kiwi TCMS

    We are happy to announce that QGIS has chosen Kiwi TCMS for the basis of their Quality Assurance methodology and infrastructure improvement program! Kiwi TCMS will play a central role in storing test case definitions, organizing test cycles, and assigning and tracking test executions by testers from the QGIS community.

Linux Kernel: GPU Blobs, 5.8, 5.9 and ARM32 in Action

Filed under
Linux
  • Netgpu and the hazards of proprietary kernel modules

    On its face, the netgpu patch set appears to add a useful feature: the ability to copy network data directly between a network adapter and a GPU without moving it through the host CPU. This patch set has quickly become an example of how not to get work into the kernel, though; it has no chance of being merged in anything like its current form and has created a backlash designed to keep modules like it from ever working in mainline kernels. It all comes down to one fundamental mistake: basing kernel work on a proprietary kernel module.
    The use case for netgpu appears to be machine-learning applications that consume large amounts of data. The processing of this data is offloaded to a GPU for performance reasons. That GPU must be fed a stream of data, though, that comes from elsewhere on the network; this data follows the usual path of first being read into main memory, then written out to the GPU. The extra copy hurts, as does the memory-bus traffic and the CPU time needed to manage this data movement.

    This overhead could be significantly reduced if the network adapter were to write the data directly into the GPU's memory, which is accessible via the PCI bus. A suitably capable network adapter could place packet data in GPU memory while writing packet headers to normal host memory; that allows the kernel's network stack to do the protocol processing as usual. The netgpu patch exists to support this mode of operation, seemingly yielding improved performance at the cost of losing some functionality; anything that requires looking at the packet payload is going to be hard to support if that data is routed directly to GPU memory.

  • Some statistics from the 5.8 kernel cycle

    Linus Torvalds released the 5.8 kernel on August 2, concluding another nine-week development cycle. By the time the work was done, 16,306 non-merge changesets had been pulled into the mainline repository for this release. That happens to be a record, beating the previous record holder (4.9, released in December 2016) by 92 changesets. It was, in other words, a busy development cycle. It's time for our traditional look into where that work came from to see what might be learned.

    A total of 1,991 developers contributed to 5.8, which is another record; 304 of those developers appeared for the first time in this cycle. The community added over 924,000 lines of code and removed around 371,000 for a net growth of over 553,000 lines of code.

  • FUSE Read/Write Passthrough Updated For Much Better File-System Performance

    Of various criticisms around FUSE for implementing file-systems in user-space, one of the most prolific issues is around the performance generally being much lower than a proper file-system kernel driver. But with the FUSE passthrough functionality that continue to be worked on, there is the potential for much better FUSE file-system performance.

    The ongoing FUSE passthrough work is about allowing the passthrough read/write of files in avoiding at times unnecessary overhead of the user-space FUSE daemon. When operating in FUSE_PASSTHROUGH mode, the daemon can allow on a per-file basis opening in passthrough mode where all read and write operations are forwarded by the kernel directly to the lower file-system rather than to the FUSE daemon running in user-space.

  • Navi 2 Fixes, Other Graphics/Display Fixes Sent In For Linux 5.9

    Following all of the feature updates to the open-source GPU/DRM drivers for Linux 5.9 that included a lot of new material, the first batch of fixes have now been sent in for mainline in addressing early fallout from these many changes.

    Ahead of the Linux 5.9-rc1 release this weekend, an initial batch of Direct Rendering Manager fixes were sent out on Thursday.

  • How the ARM32 Linux kernel decompresses

    This is intended as a comprehensive rundown of how the Linux kernel self-decompresses on ARM 32-bit legacy systems. All machines under arch/arm/* uses this method if they are booted using a compressed kernel, and most of them are using compressed kernels.

  • Walleij: How the ARM32 Linux kernel decompresses

    For those who are into the details: here is a step-by-step guide through the process of decompressing an Arm kernel and getting ready to boot from Linus Walleij.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation Broadens Relationship With Surveillance

  • Facebook joins The Linux Foundation as a platinum member

    Most web-based companies are built on Linux and open-source software. Two-billion member social network Facebook is no different. For years, Facebook has not only relied on open-source, it's been an active contributor to major open-source projects. These include the React JavaScript library; the Open Compute Project, which open sources data-center hardware; and Linux's cGroup2 container software. Now Facebook is joining The Linux Foundation membership at the Platinum level. [...] While Facebook has been criticized for how it deals with privacy and politics, it has impeccable open-source credentials. It was already the lead contributor of many Linux Foundation-hosted projects, such as Presto, GraphQL, Osquery, and ONNX. The company also employs many Linux kernel key developers and maintainers.

  • Amundsen Joins LF AI as New Incubation Project

    LF AI Foundation (LF AI), the organization building an ecosystem to sustain open source innovation in artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), and deep learning (DL), today is announcing Amundsen as its latest Incubation Project.

  • LF AI Accepts Amundsen as Incubation Project

    The Amundsen data discovery project has joined the LF AI as an incubation project. Amundsen is a data discovery and metadata engine aiming to improve the productivity of data analysts, data scientists and engineers by indexing data resources. “Think of it as Google search for data,” the LF AI announcement said.

Graphics: Mesa 20.2 RC2 and DXVK 1.7.1

  • mesa 20.2.0-rc2
    Hi list,
    
    Available today is mesa 20.2.0-rc2. This is the second release candidate for
    the 20.2 release. Currently our open to close ratio on blocking bugs is looking
    really good. This release is dominated by changes to radeonsi, radv, and aco,
    with a few additional changes sneaking in for freedreno, meson,  etnaviv,
    st/mesa, anv, and a few utility fixes.
    
    Dylan
    
    
  • Mesa 20.2-RC2 Released With Many Fixes For RadeonSI + RADV Drivers

    The second weekly release candidate of the forthcoming Mesa 20.2 is now available for testing. Mesa 20.2 is aiming for release around the end of August or early September depending upon how the bug situation plays out. This quarterly feature release to Mesa3D brings many new Vulkan extensions, the RADV driver using ACO by default, initial support for Navi 2 GPUs, initial support for Intel Rocket Lake and DG1, OpenGL 4.3 for LLVMpipe, and much more as outlined in last week's article.

  • DXVK 1.7.1 Released With Many Game Fixes For Direct3D Over Vulkan

    It's been nearly three months without a new DXVK release for mapping Direct3D 9/10/11 atop the Vulkan API while finally today there is a big feature release out. DXVK 1.7.1 was released a few minutes ago as the first update since May. While the version number isn't significant, this version does have many changes.

  • Direct3D to Vulkan translation layer DXVK 1.7.1 is out, lots of game fixes

    After a few months since 1.7 went out, DXVK 1.7.1 is now live to further improve Direct3D to Vulkan translation. This is the project that helps to power Proton, the compatibility layer for Steam Play. This release adds support for newer Vulkan extensions, fixes bugs and has new GPU driver requirements. On the driver side, the VK_EXT_transform_feedback extension is now required which has been supported in drivers on Linux since late 2018 / early 2019. Specifically you will need at least NVIDIA 415.22 and for AMD / Intel it looks like Mesa 19 covers both.

Devices/Embedded: Raspberry Pi and Android Devices

  • Indoor air quality HAT for Raspberry Pi boasts high-res TVOC sensor

    Avnet’s $49.95 “Renesas ZMOD4410 Indoor Air Quality HAT for Raspberry Pi” can be used to measure volatile organic compounds, humidity, and temperature, as well as estimate carbon dioxide levels. Avnet has launched a Renesas ZMOD4410 Indoor Air Quality HAT for Raspberry Pi (AES-RHSEN-ZM44-G) that joins other indoor air quality measurement add-ons for the Pi including Metriful’s $44.50 Sense module and Pimoroni’s $57 Enviro+ pHAT. The ZMOD4410 HAT lacks some of the extras of those boards, but appears to offer a higher quality total volatile organic compound (TVOC) sensor with its Renesas ZMOD4410, which offers resolution ranging from parts-per-billion to parts-per-million.

  • Tiny module and dev kit run RT Linux on STM32MP1

    Exor’s 25.4 x 25.4mm, extended temp “NanoSOM nS02” module runs real-time Linux and its XPlatform industrial IoT software on a soldered, 800MHz STM32MP157 with up to 1GB DDR3L and 32GB eMMC. An “OpenHMI nS02” dev kit with 5-inch touchscreen is optional. Italian embedded technology firm Exor Embedded has launched a NanoSOM nS02 module that runs real-time Linux on the new 800MHz version of ST’s dual-core, Cortex-A7 based STM32MP157. As with the recent, Apollo Lake based, FPGA-enabled GigaSOM GS01 module, Exor announced the product with Arrow, which will be distributing the module and an OpenHMI nS02 Development Kit (see farther below).

  • Zidoo Z10 Pro & Z9X Realtek RTD1619DR 4K Android Media Players Launched for $229 and up

    We previously wrote about some upcoming Realtek RTD1619 media players targeting the videophone and audiophile crowd, and expected them to launch very soon with models from Zidoo and Dune HD. Zidoo has now launched two models with the awaited Zidoo Z9X and a new, higher-end Zidoo Z10 Pro which can be purchased on Aliexpress for respectively $229 and $349 with free shipping.

  • Snapdragon 626 Powered Rugged Tablet Comes with NFC, RFID and Barcode Readers

    Estone Technology has launched another rugged tablet with UA-80 IP-67 waterproof rated, and MIL-STD-810G compliant rugged Android tablet powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 626 mobile platform driving an 8″ capacitive touchscreen display.

Python Programming

  • Announcing the new Jupyter Book

    Jupyter Book is an open source project for building beautiful, publication-quality books, websites, and documents from source material that contains computational content. With this post, we’re happy to announce that Jupyter Book has been re-written from the ground up, making it easier to install, faster to use, and able to create more complex publishing content in your books. It is now supported by the Executable Book Project, an open community that builds open source tools for interactive and executable documents in the Jupyter ecosystem and beyond.

  • Holdgraf: Announcing the new Jupyter Book

    On the Jupyter blog, Chris Holdgraf announces a rewrite of the Jupyter Book project. LWN looked at Jupyter and its interactive notebooks for Python and other languages back in 2018; Jupyter Book extends the notebook idea.

  • EuroPython 2020: Live Stream Recordings available

    We’re happy to announce the public availability of the live stream recordings from EuroPython 2020. They were already available to all conference attendees since the sprint days.

  • Learn Any Programming Language with This Learning Plan

    All it takes to master any programming language is the right learning plan. If you know anything about programming you should be aware that often you can’t tell whether what you are doing is wrong until it’s too late. That’s what makes programming a frustrating skill to master — long hours doing the wrong things. But hey, whether you want to make programming your full-time job or just a hobby, you can always make the learning curve less steep. The secret to getting it right with coding is this: have a learning plan! While the plan will not do the hard lifting for you, it will definitely provide the much-needed elbow grease to keep you grounded and focused as you learn programming.

  • Deploying Django to AWS ECS with Terraform

    In this tutorial, we'll look at how to deploy a Django app to AWS ECS with Terraform.

  • Matt Layman: Rendering Calendars - Building SaaS #68

    In this episode, I worked on rendering a calendar of important events in a school year. We built out the appropriate data structures, and I wrote some new model methods and added tests. On the last stream, I created a new model to track breaks in the school year. The app now shows the calendar for the school year, and I want to display the breaks on the calendar. Before digging too far into the code, I provided my thoughts about using Docker for development from a question that came from the chat.