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Thursday, 13 Aug 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

  • 22/05/2020 - 6:08am
    Panashe Tapera
  • 20/01/2020 - 5:37am
    johnwalsh
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    JamieCull
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    ksanaj
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    arindam1989
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    2daygeek
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    tishacrayt

Audiocasts/Shows: Destination Linux, FLOSS Weekly, Unfettered Freedom, TLLTS and Noodlings

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Destination Linux 186: Quality Control in Linux, System76 Keyboard & DLN Game Fest!

    00:00 Intro
    00:44 Welcome to DL186
    01:06 Lower Deck
    01:48 What Ryan has been up to
    02:46 What Noah has been up to
    07:11 What Michael has been up to
    10:05 Digital Ocean https://do.co/dln
    11:34 Community Feedback: Linux Mint’s System Reports
    12:47 Noah’s suggestion to the Linux Foundation to help with Tech Support in Linux
    13:59 What does the Linux Foundation do?
    16:33 Send Us Feedback: comments@destinationlinux.org
    17:06 News: System76 Reimagining The Keyboard
    22:26 Security Advisory: Snapdragon Vulnerabilities (Android Users Need To Update)
    25:21 Bitwarden https://bitwarden.com/dln
    26:56 Topic of the Week: Quality Control in Linux (DLN Forum Thread)
    41:21 DLN Game Fest on August 30th at 4PM Eastern!
    43:48 Linux Gaming: Camp Canyonwood
    45:18 Tip of the Week: /boot
    47:17 ShellShock Added to DLN Game Fest by Patron Request
    48:19 Software Spotlight: ProtonMail Bridge
    48:52 Become a Patron of Destination Linux
    50:15 DLN Store https://dlnstore.com
    50:39 Join the DLN Community! (Ryan made Noah give up on the \being hip\ stuff this week lol)
    52:14 More Great Content at DestinationLinux.Network
    52:33 Journey itself . . .
    52:39 Preview of the Patron Post Show

  • FLOSS Weekly 591: PLATO & The Rise of Cyberculture - Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operations

    P.L.A.T.O. is an acronym for Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operations. Before the internet, there was the PLATO system which was not only computer-based education but, surprisingly, the first online community. Doc Searls talks with Shawn Powers and Brian Dear who was the author of Friendly Orange Glow which is the first book on PLATO. The book discusses the importance of PLATO. PLATO was the original incubator for social computing: instant messaging, chat rooms, message forums, the world's first online newspaper, and so much more. PLATO also created flat-panel gas plasma displays and was one of the first systems with touch panels built-in to the screen. They discuss how PLATO and the rise of the cyberculture and the internet were due to the "Hacker Method" an agreement among early developers to share and have open code.

  • Unfettered Freedom, Ep. 2 - FSF Elects President, Emacs 27.1, Mozilla Layoffs, HBO Drops Linux

    Unfettered Freedom is a video podcast that focuses on news and topics about GNU/Linux, free software and open source software. On this freedom-packed episode: 0:00 - Intro 1:27 - Free Software Foundation finally elects a new president.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 870

    samsung chromebook review, developing on chromebook, arduino, keypad programming

  • Noodlings | BIOS Games Serving the NDI™ Plugin

    18 Episodes… 18 is a fun number. Divisible by 2, 3, 6 and 9. The age you can vote in the United States.

Java Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Java date format

    Date value needs to format for various programming purposes. One of the essential reasons to format the date is to represent the date value in a human-readable format. Many classes exist in Java to format the date value. DateTimeFormatter and SimpleDateFormat are two of them. These classes can be used to format date values in different ways. How these two classes can be used to format the date in Java is explained in this tutorial.

  • Java Enum Tutorial

    Java enum is a special Java type that defines by a Java class. It is also called the Java enumeration type. It is introduced in Java version 5 first, which is mainly used to define the collection of constants. The compile type of safety is ensured by using the enum type. So, when all possible values of the variable are known before compile time, then it is better to use enum type. It defines a class that always extends from java.lang.Enum. How enum type can be declared and used in Java are shown in this tutorial.

  • Java Abstract Class

    The concept of the abstraction is to highlight the task of the object instead of highlighting, “how the object does the task”. This type of concept can be implemented by using two ways in Java. These are the abstract class and interface. Abstract class contains the keyword abstract. This class can not be initiated like other normal classes, but a subclass can be derived by inheriting the abstract class. The features of the abstract class can be accessed by creating the object of the subclass. An abstract class can also contain the constructor that can be accessed by creating the object of the subclass class. How you can use an abstract class in Java is shown in this tutorial.

  • Java exception handling

    When the normal flow of the program execution interrupts for any error, then it is called an exception. This type of event can be handled by using a try-catch-finally block. An exception is an object that is used to catch the error and run the statement based on the error condition that is called exception handling. Mainly two types of error are handled by exception handling. These are compiled time errors and run-time errors. The run-time errors are handled by exception handling. How you can handle exceptions in Java is explained in this tutorial.

KDE Neon 20.04 Review: Fast and Stable

Filed under
KDE

If you are a KDE fan, like always, this is good news. The latest KDE Neon 20.04 operating system is here. #kde #KDENEON
Read more

Tiny module and dev kit run RT Linux on STM32MP1

Filed under
Linux

Exor’s 25.4 x 25.4mm, extended temp “NanoSOM nS02” module runs real-time Linux and its XPlatform industrial IoT software on a soldered, 800MHz STM32MP157 with up to 1GB DDR3L and 32GB eMMC. An “OpenHMI nS02” dev kit with 5-inch touchscreen is optional.

Italian embedded technology firm Exor Embedded has launched a NanoSOM nS02 module that runs real-time Linux on the new 800MHz version of ST’s dual-core, Cortex-A7 based STM32MP157. As with the recent, Apollo Lake based, FPGA-enabled GigaSOM GS01 module, Exor announced the product with Arrow, which will be distributing the module and an OpenHMI nS02 Development Kit (see farther below).

Read more

Endless OS 3.8.5

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Endless OS 3.8.5 was released for existing users today, August 10th, 2020.
Downloadable images for new users will be available in the next few days.

Read more

Linspire 9.0 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today our development team is excited to announce the release of Linspire 9.0; packed with a TON of improvements and security updates, this is a major update that we’ve been working hard to get out to our faithful users. The global pandemic has delayed its release, but the development team has worked diligently and meticulously behind-the-scenes over the past few months, fine-tuning every detail of what is widely considered to be the premier Linux desktop on the market today.

The Linspire 9.0 series will be the last one featuring the 18.04 LTS codebase; upcoming Linspire X will be based on the 20.04 LTS code and kernel.

Read more

Also: Linspire 9.0 Officially Released, Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Linux 5.4 LTS

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Fast Bare Metal provisioning and infrastructure automation with MAAS
  • [Updated] Michael Stapelberg: Optional dependencies don’t work

    In the i3 projects, we have always tried hard to avoid optional dependencies. There are a number of reasons behind it, and as I have recently encountered some of the downsides of optional dependencies firsthand, I summarized my thoughts in this article.

  • Benchmarking NetBSD, second evaluation report

    This report was written by Apurva Nandan as part of Google Summer of Code 2020.

    This blog post is in continuation of GSoC Reports: Benchmarking NetBSD, first evaluation report blog and describes my progress in the second phase of GSoC 2020 under The NetBSD Foundation.

    In this phase, I worked on the automation of the regression suite made using Phoronix Test Suite (PTS) and its integration with Anita.

    The automation framework consists of two components Phoromatic server, provided by Phoronix Test Suite in pkgsrc, and Anita, a Python tool for automating NetBSD installation.

  • Interest in Kodi Declines After a Turmultuous Few Years of Piracy Headlines

    After many years of being mentioned in the same breath as movie and TV show piracy, interest in the Kodi media player appears to have peaked and is now on the decline. That's according to Google Trends data which suggests that after reaching a high in early 2017, interest via search is now on a continuous downward trend.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • RcppSimdJson 0.1.1: More Features

    A first update following for the exciting RcppSimdJson 0.1.0 release last month is now on CRAN. Version 0.1.1 brings further enhancements such direct parsing of raw chars, working with compressed files as well as much expanded querying ability all thanks to Brendan, some improvements to our demos thanks to Daniel as well as a small fix via a one-liner borrowed from upstream for a reported UBSAN issue.

    RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire and collaborators. Via very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle use per byte parsed; see the video of the talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (also voted best talk).

  • Jonathan Dowland: Generic Haskell

    When I did the work described earlier in template haskell, I also explored generic programming in Haskell to solve a particular problem. StrIoT is a program generator: it outputs source code, which may depend upon other modules, which need to be imported via declarations at the top of the source code files.

    The data structure that StrIoT manipulates contains information about what modules are loaded to resolve the names that have been used in the input code, so we can walk that structure to automatically derive an import list. The generic programming tools I used for this are from Structure Your Boilerplate (SYB), a module written to complement a paper of the same name.

  • 9 reasons I upgraded from AngularJS to Angular

    In 2010, Google released AngularJS, an open source, JavaScript-based frontend structure for developing single-page applications (SPAs) for the internet. With its move to version 2.0 in 2016, the framework's name was shortened to Angular. AngularJS is still being developed and used, but Angular's advantages mean it's a smart idea to migrate to the newer version.

  • [Old/Odd] 5 news feautures of PHP-7.2

    Before PHP 7.2 the object keyword was used to convert one data type to another (boxing and unboxing), for example, an array to an object of the sdtClass class and/or vice versa, as of PHP 7.2 the object data type can be used as parameter type or as function return type.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 351

Proprietary Software and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • [PCLinuxOS] Opera Browser updated to 70.0.3728.106

    Opera is a Chromium-based browser using the Blink layout engine. It differentiates itself because of a distinct user interface and other features.

  • Vivaldi Explains Why They Make "Proprietary Garbage"

    It is unfair to say that Vivaldi is not open source at all as someone like Distrotube has done, the way the company behind Vivaldi has decided to handle this application is by using a dual licensing system where the open source portion of the application is licensed under an open source BSD license but that's not the point of today, the point is to explain why they have decided to license their software in such a way.

  • Scientists Forced To Change Names Of Human Genes Because Of Microsoft's Failure To Patch Excel

    Six years ago, Techdirt wrote about a curious issue with Microsoft's Excel. A default date conversion feature was altering the names of genes, because they looked like dates. For example, the tumor suppressor gene DEC1 (Deleted in Esophageal Cancer 1) was being converted to "1-DEC". Hardly a widespread problem, you might think. Not so: research in 2016 found that nearly 20% of 3500 papers taken from leading genomic journals contained gene lists that had been corrupted by Excel's re-interpretation of names as dates. Although there don't seem to be any instances where this led to serious errors, there is a natural concern that it could distort research results. The good news is this problem has now been fixed. The rather surprising news is that it wasn't Microsoft that fixed it, even though Excel was at fault. As an article in The Verge reports:

  • The Linux Foundation Wants Open-Source Tech to Address Future Pandemics

    The Linux Foundation, which supports open-source innovation in blockchain tech, launched the Linux Foundation Public Health Initiative (LFPHI) at the end of July. The LFPHI’s goal is to promote the use of open source by public health authorities, which can be scrutinized by anyone, to fight not just COVID-19 but future pandemics as well.

  • LF Edge’s Akraino Project Release 3 Now Available, Unifying Open Source Blueprints Across MEC, AI, Cloud and Telecom Edge

    LF Edge, an umbrella organization within the Linux Foundation that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system, today announced the availability of Akraino Release 3 (“Akraino R3”). Akraino’s third and most mature release to date delivers fully functional edge solutions– implemented across global organizations– to enable a diversity of edge deployments across the globe. New blueprints include a focus on MEC, AI/ML, and Cloud edge. In addition, the community authored the first iteration of a new white paper to bring common open edge API standards to align the industry.

  • Linux Foundation Launches Jenkins X Training Course

    Linux Foundation has launched a new training course, LFS268 – CI/CD with Jenkins X. Developed in conjunction with the Continuous Delivery Foundation, the course will introduce the fundamentals of Jenkins X.

GNU/Linux Laptops/Desktop: Librem 14, System76 and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Librem 14 Enhancements

    The Hardware kill switches have seen a number of enhancements. This is also the first Purism laptop to ship with a BIOS write protection switch and all M.2 key-E interfaces implemented.

    The Librem 14 is our most powerful and most secure laptop yet. If you want full control over your computer with cutting-edge, powerful hardware, the Librem 14 is the best (some would say the only) choice. Make it yours here.

  •        

  • The 2020 System76 Oryx Pro: Their Best 15" Laptop Yet!

    I've had the new System76 Oryx Pro in the studio for a while now, and in this full review, I'll give you guys my thoughts. We'll take a look at the hardware, switchable graphics, and discover the meaning of life along the way.

  •        

  • Is Microsoft finally getting its Windows update act together?

    Updating Windows has become a bad joke. I can install three Linux distributions in the same time it takes me to make a single serious Windows upgrade.

SUSE: OBS, 'Cloud' and Chat With Linux Kernel Developer at SUSE

Filed under
SUSE
  • OBS NDI™ Plugin on openSUSE

    The NDI plugin offers a fairly easy way to send OBS video signal (presumably other applications can take advantage of this too) to another OBS instance on another machine. This can come in handy for numerous reasons such as splitting up workloads between machines by capturing output from one machine, such as gaming computer, to stream with a dedicated unit that interfaces with YouTube. This has advantages in that you can move the machine doing the heavy lifting into another room or across the room as to not hear the fans and so forth. In my case, my primary machine is getting long in the tooth. I prefer the setup I have as far as the screen layout and height of the computer as well as the location. I use my AMD Desktop / server / workstation machine to talk to YouTube or Twitch directly with that OBS instance and record locally in effect freeing up my laptop from quite a bit of the workload.

  • Data Explosion – Is the Cloud Your Silver Bullet?
  • Women in Tech: “Aptitude has nothing to do with gender or inborn capabilities”

    Women are underrepresented in the tech sector —myth or reality? Three years ago, we launched a diversity series aimed at bringing the most inspirational and powerful women in the tech scene to your attention. Today, we’d like you to meet Jessica Yu, Linux Kernel Developer at SUSE.
    A research study by The National Center for Women & Information Technology showed that “gender diversity has specific benefits in technology settings,” which could explain why tech companies have started to invest in initiatives that aim to boost the number of female applicants, recruit them in a more effective way, retain them for longer, and give them the opportunity to advance. But is it enough?

    Three years ago, we launched a diversity series aimed at bringing the most inspirational and powerful women in the tech scene to your attention. Today, we’d like you to meet Jessica Yu, Linux Kernel Developer at SUSE.

Graphics: Radeon, GPUs and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise 20.Q3 Released For Linux

    AMD has released their Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise 20.Q3 driver as their quarterly update to this enterprise-rated driver for their professional/workstation graphics offerings. In step with the new Windows driver release is also the 20.Q3 packaged Linux driver for enterprise distributions including RHEL/CentOS 8.1, RHEL/CentOS 7.8, Ubuntu 18.04.4, and SUSE SLED/SLES 15.

    [...]

    With being based on the older 20.10 branch and not the latest 20.30 series and as acknowledged by the release notes, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is not supported by the 20.Q3 driver release. RHEL/CentOS 8.2 also isn't officially supported but jut 8.1.

  • Lockdep False Positives, some stories about

    Recently we’ve looked a bit at lockdep annotations in the GPU subsystems, and I figured it’s a good opportunity to explain how this all works, and what the tradeoffs are. Creating working locking hierarchies for the kernel isn’t easy, making sure the kernel’s locking validator lockdep is happy and reviewers don’t have their brains explode even more so.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Formatting

    One thing that’s everywhere in mesa (at least outside of mesa core) is enum pipe_format. This enum is used to describe image formats.

Devices: AWOW AK41 Mini Desktop, Raspberry Pi, RISC-V and More

Filed under
Hardware
  • AWOW AK41 Mini Desktop PC – Web Browsing – Week 6

    This is a weekly blog chronicling my experiences of using the AWOW AK41 Mini Desktop PC on Linux.

    This week’s blog focuses on a fundamental desktop activity. Surfing the web. A web browser is the quintessential desktop application. Everyone needs one, and there is not a desktop Linux distribution around that does not make a web browser available. In 2020, it’s estimated 4.8 billion people used a web browser.

    For Linux, there’s a web browser for every need. There’s heavyweight browsers jammed with a large feature set with addons and extensions. Then there’s leaner web browsers which still offer an attractive graphical interface. And there’s lightweight browsers including console based web browsers too.

    Over the years, I’ve tried almost every web browser available for Linux. For the AWOW AK41, my focus has rested primarily with Chrome and Firefox. I’ve used them extensively on the AK41 for the past 6 weeks browsing hundreds of web sites that are laden to the hilt with JavaScript. I’ve also written and edited numerous articles for LinuxLinks (including this series on the AK41), internet shopping, played (too many) web based games, substituted my regular email client (Thunderbird) with Gmail, watched videos on YouTube, iPlayer and other services. How does the AK41 perform?

  • Mini-PC and SBC build on Whiskey Lake

    Supermicro’s 3.5-inch “X11SWN-H-WOHS” SBC and “SYS-E100-9W-H” mini-PC based it feature an 8th Gen UE-series CPU, HDMI and DP, 4x USB 3.1 Gen2, 2x GbE, and 3x M.2.

    Supermicro has launched a fanless, 8th Gen Whiskey Lake SBC and mini-PC. The SYS-E100-9W-H mini-PC (or SuperServer E100-9W-H), which was reported on by Fanless Tech, is certified only to run Windows 10, but the 3.5-inch X11SWN-H-WOHS SBC supports Ubuntu. Applications include industrial automation, retail, smart medical expert systems, kiosks, interactive info systems, and digital signage.

  • MeLE PCG02 GLK Fanless PC Stick Comes with 10W Celeron J4105 Processor, Gigabit Ethernet

    Back in 2018, MeLE unveiled PCG02 Apo TV stick with a 6W Intel Celeron N3450 quad-core Apollo Lake processor, 4GB RAM, 32GB storage, HDMI output, USB 3.0 ports, and an unusual Gigabit Ethernet port for this form factor.

    The company is back with an upgraded model as MeLE PCG02 GLK PC stick is based on the same design but with a more powerful Intel Celeron J4105 Gemini Lake processor with a 10W TDP. The design is fanless, so it will be interesting to find out how well they handle cooling.

  • Whiskey Lake computer has PoE and optional PCIe x4 AI accelerators

    IEI’s rugged, Linux-ready “DRPC-230-ULT5” DIN-rail system runs on 8th Gen U-series CPUs with 3x GbE, up to 6x USB 3.2 Gen 2, 6x COM, SATA, DP, HDMI, mini-PCIe, M.2, and optional PCIe x4 with Myriad X-based AI cards.

    IEI has launched three fanless DRPC-230-ULT5 embedded computers with DIN-rail mounting that run Linux or Win 10 on Intel 8th Gen Whiskey Lake CPUs. The fanless i5/S and C/S models share a 190 x 150 x 81mm footprint, but it is the i5/S and larger, 190 x 150 x 127mm i5/8G-R10 model that have the most in common. They both feature the quad-core, 8-thread, 1.6GHz/4.1GHz Core i5-8365UE while the C/S model has a dual-core, 2-thread, 1.8GHz Celeron 4205U.

  • New twist on Raspberry Pi experimental resin 3D printer
  • Two Ways you can Enhance your Pinebook Pro workflow with a Raspberry Pi

    The Pinebook Pro is an awesome ARM laptop, and when paired with a Raspberry Pi, it's even more awesome. In this video, I'll show you how to offload your browser and terminal tasks to free up the RAM on the Pinebook, giving you additional resources.

  • Getting to know RISC-V through the hifive1-revb board

    I have been interested in the RISC-V architecture for a while. RISC-V is an Instruction Set Architecture, like ARM, MIPS or x86, but it is developed and provided under an open source license.

    A couple of weeks ago the hifive1-revb development board I ordered from Crowd Supply arrived and I have been using it to get to know RISC-V a bit. The small get-to-know-the-board project I settled on was to use the LEDs on the board to blink HELLO in morse code using RISC-V assembly.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines 187, LINUX Unplugged 366, mintCast 341 and Useful Tools Within Emacs For Writers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 2020-08-12 | Linux Headlines 187

    Mozilla announces a restructuring that lays off 250 employees, LibreOffice 7 posts an impressive adoption rate, Go version 1.15 is out with improvements to the toolchain, and WordPress 5.5 brings significant changes to the platform.

  • Linux Server Salvage | LINUX Unplugged 366

    We refurbish a special machine from the Jupiter Broadcasting Hardware Archive and try out Matrix, the one chat platform to rule them all.

    Plus Dan and Cassidy from elementary OS join us to discuss version 6.0.

  • mintCast 341 – GRUB Breaks the Internet

    First up, in our Wanderings, I’ve been browsing, Joe’s been fixing docks, Moss has been slowly filling up his machine, and Tony Watts gets a new axe

    Then, our news Linux Mint gets stats, Gnome squashes a memory bug, and Ubuntu hits its first 20.04 point release.

  • Useful Tools Within Emacs For Writers

    There seems to be a misconception about Emacs. Many think that Emacs is only useful for programming. Nothing could be further from the truth. If you do any kind of writing, you owe it to yourself to take a look at the tools that Emacs offers.

KDE With Windows (DRM and Spying), Krita GSoC Reports

Filed under
KDE
  • Windows Store Monthly Statistics

    For completeness, overall acquisitions since the stuff is in the store:

    Kate - Advanced Text Editor - 53,919 acquisitions

    Okular - More than a reader - 45,885 acquisitions

    Filelight - Disk Usage Visualizer - 9,033 acquisitions

    Kile - A user-friendly TeX/LaTeX editor - 5,446 acquisitions

    KStars - Astronomy Software - 2,935 acquisitions

    Elisa - Modern Music Player - 1,710 acquisitions

  • [Krita] SeExpr status update!

    It’s been quite a while since my last post. Exams for my teaching certification have not gone as expected – had to pull out after being flattened in quite a critical one…

    Buuuut! I am glad to announce that the SeExpr documentation is now available in the Krita manual!

  • Week 9 and 10 : [Krita] GSoC Project Report

    Last two weeks I worked on implementing saving and loading of storyboard items and fixed some bugs. For implementing saving and loading I created a copy of the data from the models in KisDocument. That data is kept in sync with the data in models.

    Saving and loading of storyboard items are working now. You can save a krita document with storyboards in it and the storyboard data will be saved. Thumbnails are not saved into the .kra file but are loaded using the frame number when the document is loaded. Other than that all data related to the storyboard such as scene name, comments, duration are saved. Since the data is in KisDocument we will have storyboards for each of the .kra files.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Introduction to vDPA kernel framework

    This posts provides a high level overview of the vDPA (virtio data path acceleration) kernel framework merged to the Linux kernel in March 2020. This effort spanned almost three years, involved many developers and went through a number of iterations until agreed upon by the upstream community. For additional information on vDPA in general please refer to our previous post, "Achieving network wirespeed in an open standard manner: introducing vDPA."

    The vDPA kernel framework is a pillar in productizing the end-to-end vDPA solution and it enables NIC vendors to integrate their vDPA NIC kernel drivers into the framework as part of their productization efforts.

  • Red Hat Begins Talking Up The New RHEL Flatpak Runtime

    With the recently released Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2, the Flatpak sandboxing and app distribution tech is ready to shine and there is also the new Red Hat Enterprise Linux Flatpak runtime.

    The Flatpak runtime and SDK images are supported with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2 with a focus on containerized desktop applications. The new RHEL Flatpak Runtime follows the traditional Red Hat Enterprise Linux lifecycle that is expected for a much longer duration than the likes of the FreeDesktop.org Flatpak Runtime. Red Hat intends to maintain their new Flatpak runtime for the same 10-year cycle as RHEL8.

  • Introducing the Red Hat Flatpak runtime for desktop containers

    For many years, application developers who wanted to create desktop applications for Linux had to build their applications not just for a particular Linux operating system, but for a particular version of that operating system. Whether it was on the server-side or the desktop, developers wanted to create applications that reliably worked the same in development and production environments. They wanted to upgrade the production environment without having to rebuild and revalidate every running application.

    Containers solved these requirements for server-side applications, but not for the desktop. That’s why we need Flatpak, a container system just for desktop applications. In this article, I offer an overview of Flatpak, its integration with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.2, and what developers can expect from the new Red Hat Enterprise Linux Flatpak runtime.

  • Fedora's FESCo Approves Using DXVK As Their Default Wine Direct3D Back-End

    Last month was the proposal for Fedora to make DXVK their default back-end for Direct3D 9/10/11 usage with their packaged Wine build rather than WineD3D. That's now been approved for Fedora 33!

    The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) has approved the proposal to use DXVK by default with their Wine package rather than WineD3D, which maps D3D 9/10/11 over OpenGL. With DXVK going from Direct3D to Vulkan it generally delivers sizable performance benefits especially for modern Windows games.

  • How RBC Built Its Own GPU Farm for an Artificial Intelligence-Powered Banking Platform

    Its vendors, Nvidia and Red Hat, expect lessons from the collaborative project will benefit the broader fintech space, as well as other industries.

  • Best YUM Command Examples For Everyone

    List Of Best YUM Command Examples For RHEL or CentOS users.

    YUM or Yellowdog Updater, Modified is a free package management system for RPM-based Linux distributions. It is e de-facto tool for installing and maintaining packages on RHEL, CentOS, and few other Linux operating systems.

    In this post, we are going to show you some of the best YUM command examples that might be of help.

Laravel Programming

Filed under
Development

Mozilla: Browser Wish List, Layoffs and "Web Monetization"

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Browser Wish List - Distressful Content Filtering

    On the other hands, they are system where you can shield yourself against the website practice. For example for privacy, you may want to use something like uMatrix where you can block everything by default, and allow certain HTTP responses type for each individual URIs. This is what I do on my main browser. It requests a strong effort in tailoring each individual pages. It's a built a policy on the go. It creates general list for future sites (you may block Google Analytics for every future sites you will encounter), but still it doesn't really learn more than that on how to act on your future browsing.

    We could imagine applying this method to distressful content with keywords in the page. In terms of distressful content, it may dramatically fail for the same reasons that universal shields fail. They don't understand the content, they just apply a set of rules.

  • Firefox maker Mozilla axes a quarter of its workforce, blames coronavirus, vows to 'develop new revenue streams'

    Firefox maker Mozilla has axed 250 employees, or a quarter of its workforce, claiming the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic is to blame after hitting it in the wallet. The organization will also "ship new products faster and develop new revenue streams."

    “Economic conditions resulting from the global pandemic have significantly impacted our revenue,” Mozilla Corp CEO Mitchell Baker said in a public statement today. “As a result, our pre-COVID plan was no longer workable.”

    Mozilla gets the vast, vast majority of its funding from Google, Yandex, and Baidu, who pay to be the default search engine in Firefox in their regions. In 2018, Moz had a $451m cash pile, 95 per cent of which, some $430m, was provided by these web giants. Those deals will expire [PDF, p25] in November 2020 unless renewed or renegotiated.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: js13kGames 2020: A lean coding challenge with WebXR and Web Monetization

    Have you heard about the js13kGames competition? It’s an online code-golfing challenge for HTML5 game developers. The month-long competition has been happening annually since 2012; it runs from August 13th through September 13th. And the fun part? We set the size limit of the zip package to 13 kilobytes, and that includes all sources—from graphic assets to lines of JavaScript. For the second year in a row you will be able to participate in two special categories: WebXR and Web Monetization.

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