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Open Hardware: Raspberry Pi, Astro Pi and OpenPower Foundation

  • Low-cost air quality sensor works with Raspberry Pi

    Metriful is launching a $39 “Sense” indoor air quality sensor module that works with the Raspberry Pi and other I2C-enabled systems. Other sensors include temperature, humidity, air pressure, light, and sound. In recent months, much of the world’s population has spent a lot of time indoors, often crowded into small apartments. If the air quality has improved outside due to the pandemic, the same cannot always be said for the indoor realm. Metriful has gone to Kickstarter launch a remarkably low-cost sensor board called Sense to help you find how much pollution has come inside and how much is being generated from within from HVAC, cooking, and manufactured goods. It also checks temperature, humidity, air pressure, light, sound, and even gives you a rough estimation of CO2. Metriful has posted example code and setup instructions for Raspberry Pi and Arduino on GitHub and offers additional documentation.

  • 6558 programs from young people have run on the ISS for Astro Pi 2019/20!
  • OpenPower Puts Open Source Software Guru In Charge

    Effective today, Kulina, is the new executive director of the OpenPower Foundation, and his appointment follows the trend of gradually moving from a systems-centric view from the people at the top to one where people are more familiar with the open source software movement and how to build ecosystems. We had a chat about the OpenPower effort and what plans Kulina has to shape what the foundation does and to make Power more broadly implemented than it is currently today.

Linux Foundation Leftovers

  • New Cloud Engineer Bootcamp from The Linux Foundation Fully Prepares Individuals for a Cloud Career
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the availability of its first ever bootcamp program, designed to take individuals from newbie to certified cloud engineer in six months. The Linux Foundation Cloud Engineer Bootcamp bundles self-paced eLearning courses with certification exams and dedicated instructor support for a comprehensive and well-rounded educational program. The training begins with Linux at the operating system layer, and moves up the stack, covering DevOps, cloud, containers and more, providing all the knowledge needed to work as a cloud engineer. The specific courses and exams included, all of which are taken online, are...

  • The Linux Foundation introduces Cloud Engineer Bootcamp for cloud job seekers

    Back when I was going to tech shows every few weeks, no matter what the show was about -- Linux, networking, open-source software development -- I could always count on one thing: Every, and I mean every, company was looking for cloud-savvy people to hire. Indeed.com found that between October 2015 and October 2019, cloud computing jobs increased by 55%. By 2022, Gartner predicts the public cloud services market alone will be three times bigger than overall IT services. But there isn't anything like enough cloud experts to meet the demand. That's where the Linux Foundation's new Cloud Engineer Bootcamp comes in.

  • Linux Foundation Launches Cloud Engineer Bootcamp

    The Linux Foundation has announced its first ever bootcamp program, designed to take individuals from newbie to certified cloud engineer in six months. The training begins with Linux at the operating system layer, and moves up the stack, covering DevOps, cloud, containers and more, providing all the knowledge needed to work as a cloud engineer. The Linux Foundation Cloud Engineer Bootcamp bundles self-paced eLearning courses with certification exams and dedicated instructor support for a well-rounded educational program. “A price point significantly below most bootcamps, coupled with industry-leading certifications and vendor-neutral training, makes this offering a tremendous value and provides an accessible option for individuals looking to break into the IT and cloud industries. At the same time, it will help close the talent gap and ensure adequate staffing for companies seeking cloud talent,” quipped Clyde Seepersad, SVP and general manager of training & certification at The Linux Foundation.

  • Priyanka Sharma Takes Over The Helm Of CNCF

Python Programming

  • Regular Expressions: Regexes in Python (Part 2)

    In the previous tutorial in this series, you covered a lot of ground. You saw how to use re.search() to perform pattern matching with regexes in Python and learned about the many regex metacharacters and parsing flags that you can use to fine-tune your pattern-matching capabilities.

  • Introducing the PyCharm Guide

    Want to be a badass at Python coding with PyCharm? Keep reading! Over the last few years we have been collecting productivity tips, tutorials, and a lot more into a central, video-oriented resource, and now we are ready to introduce you to our brand new PyCharm Guide!

  • PyCharm 2020.1.2

    PyCharm 2020.1.2 is out now with fixes that will improve your software development experience. Update from within PyCharm (Help | Check for Updates), using the JetBrains Toolbox, or by downloading the new version from our website.

  • Binary Search in Python

    In this article, we'll be diving into the idea behind and Python implementation of Binary Search. Binary Search is an efficient search algorithm that works on sorted arrays. It's often used as one of the first examples of algorithms that run in logarithmic time (O(logn)) because of its intuitive behavior, and is a fundamental algorithm in Computer Science.

  • Django security releases issued: 3.0.7 and 2.2.13

    In accordance with our security release policy, the Django team is issuing Django 3.0.7 and Django 2.2.13. These releases address the security issue detailed below. We encourage all users of Django to upgrade as soon as possible.

  • Report of May 26th Cubicweb Meeting
  • CubicWeb: Report of June 3rd Cubicweb Meeting
  • 2nd Edition for Python Automation Cookbook now available!

    As the first edition, it’s aimed to people that already know a bit of Python (not necessarily developers). It describes how to automate common tasks. Things like work with different kind of documents, generating graphs, sending emails, text messages… You can check the whole table of contents for more details.

  • Cosmic Pyhton

    Along with my coauthor Bob, we are proud to release "Architecture Patterns with Python", which you can find out more about at cosmicpython.com. The cosmic soubriquet is a little joke, Cosmos being the opposite of Chaos in ancient Greek, so we want to propose patterns to minimise chaos in your applications. But the subtitle of the book is Enabling TDD, DDD, and Event-Driven Microservices, and the TDD part is relevant to this blog, and fans of the Testing Goat. In my two years at MADE and working with Bob, I've refined some of my thinking and some of the ways I approach testing, and I think if I were writing TTDwP again today, I might change the way I present some things.

  • My Top 7 Picks on PyCon 2020 Online

    Now there is a lot of technology conferences going online. Which is boon for anyone unable to attend it? Especially I wish to have a chance to go to PyCon US someday. To have a chat with a bunch of Python developers in the US and across the world. Recently while I was listening on one of the podcast episodes on Talk Python to Me - Why Python is Slow?. That PyCon 2020 has happened with video recordings will be posted online on their Youtube Channel. I started to look for videos that are interesting to me. Which I believe will be useful for you. So here it goes!!!

  • A dark theme for auto-generated API documentation

    Starting with version 3.2, Zato will use a new, dark theme for its auto-generated API documentation and specifications. Here is its preview.

Taking the Sting out of Stingray

The recent announcement that the DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) was authorized to conduct covert surveillance on protestors got me thinking about how one could protect oneself against that kind of mass surveillance both in general and specifically in the context of attending or documenting (or just being near) a protest. It made me particularly thankful that we designed the Librem 5 to have a cellular hardware kill switch and in this post I’m going to give a quick overview of Stingray technology, the implications of its use at a protest, how the use of aerial stingrays (aka “dirtboxes”) extends its mass-surveillance capabilities, and how the Librem 5’s hardware kill switches give you control over where, when and how you are surveilled. Our customers are from all walks of life and as such face a wide range of threats ranging from every-day risks from using the Internet all the way to customers concerned about nation state actors. We develop our security measures with all this in mind and try to strike the right balance between strong security (like our anti-interdiction services and PureBoot) and convenience (hardware kill switches). We also believe strongly that the customer, not us nor anyone else, should be in control of their computers and in control of their privacy, and this along with our commitment to Free Software guides all of our design decisions. Read more