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Open Hardware/Modding: Arduino IDE, Raspberry Pi and PocketPCR

  • Arduino IDE 1.8.11 now available to download

    The Arduino development team has today announced the availability of a new Arduino IDE in the form of Arduino 1.8.11. The open-source Arduino Software (IDE) makes it easy to write code and upload it to the range of Arduino development boards board. The Arduino IDE can be loaded onto Windows requires Win 8.1 or 10, Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion or newer, and Linux 32 and 64 bit computers and is written in Java and based on Processing and other open-source software.

  • Can you connect a Raspberry Pi to a GoPro Hero 6?

    A contractor is drilling in the office space above ours, and it sounds like we’re under attack by a swarm of very angry, Transformeresque bees. We can’t hear ourselves think. Although we can hear the drills.

  • Put The Power Of PCR In Your Pocket With This Open-Source Thermal Cycler

    When the first thermal cyclers for the polymerase chain reaction came out in the 1980s, they were as expensive as a market driven by grant money could make them. Things haven’t got much better over the years, largely shutting STEM classes and biohackers out of the PCR market. That may be about to change, though, if the €99.00 PocketPCR thermal cycler takes hold. PCR amplifies DNA in a three-step process: denaturation, which melts double-stranded DNA into single strands; annealing, which lets small pieces of primer DNA bind to either side of the region of interest; and elongation, where the enzyme DNA polymerase zips along the single strands starting at the primer to replicate the DNA. The cycle repeats and copies of the original DNA accumulate exponentially. Like any thermal cycler, [Urs Gaudenz]’s PocketPCR automates those temperature shifts, using a combination of PCB-mounted heating elements and a cooling fan. The coils rapidly heat a reaction block up to the 99°C denaturation temperature, the fan brings that down to the 68°C needed for annealing, and then the temperature ramps back up to 72°C for elongation with thermostable DNA polymerase. PID loops keep the reaction temperature precisely controlled. The whole thing is, as the name suggests, small enough to fit in a pocket, and can either be purchased in kit form or scratch-built from the build files on GitHub.

iXsystems' TrueNAS & FreeNAS Hit 11.3

FreeNAS is a free and open-source NAS software based off of FreeBSD and OpenZFS. It runs on commodity x86-64 hardware, as well as iXsystems gear. FreeNAS supports Window, macOS, and Unix as well as virtualization hosts like XenServer and VMware. TrueNAS is aimed at enterprise storage and supports SMB, AFP, NFS, iSCSI, SSH, rsync and FTP/TFTP sharing protocols over Ethernet and Fibre Channel network fabrics. TrueNAS also supports VMware as well as over protocols such as Microsoft CSV, ODX, and VSS, and Veeam. Part of the 11.3 update sees TrueNAS gain several of the features that were already running in FreeNAS, now fully vetted and ready to go to the enterprise. These features include the modernized web UI as well as the ability to use and manage jails, plugins, and VMs. The new features are available in TrueNAS X-Series and M-Series platforms that scale from 10TB to over 10PB with hybrid or all-flash models. Read more

today's howtos

GNU Projects and Upcoming LibrePlanet

  • Mark J. Wielaard: A mission statement and social contract for GNU

    2019 was a difficult year for the Free Software Community with lots of questions about the future of GNU. It is hard to come up with good answers unless you know which shared principles you all value. After a very long discussion we finally have a first GNU Social Contract DRAFT and a new public wiki for GNU maintainers to share public discussion documents like this.

  • Pre-release 1.8.90 in alpha.gnu.org

    The pre-release recutils-1.8.90.tar.gz is now available at ftp://alpha.gnu.org/gnu/recutils/recutils-1.8.90.tar.gz The NEWS file in the tarball contains a list of the changes since 1.8. The planned date for releasing 1.9 is Saturday 1 February 2020.

  • GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 16 new GNU releases in January!

    bison-3.5.1 gmp-6.2.0 gnuhealth-3.6.2 gnunet-0.12.2 grep-3.4 gsasl-1.8.1 guile-3.0.0 help2man-1.47.12 hyperbole-7.0.8 kawa-3.1.1 libredwg-0.10.1 make-4.3 mes-0.22 parallel-20200122 sed-4.8 unifont-12.1.04

  • LibrePlanet 2020: We'll see you at the Back Bay Events Center in Boston, MA!

    We at the Free Software Foundation (FSF) are excited to say that the Dorothy Quincy suite of Boston's very own Back Bay Events Center will be the home of this year's LibrePlanet conference! We've taken the grand tour and couldn't be happier about our choice of location. We're confident that the Events Center will be a great host for the technology and social justice conference we've all come to know and love. It's just the right place for us (and the movement) to take our next steps in freeing the future. The Events Center is providing LibrePlanet with its own entrance and a dedicated and speedy Internet connection for the livestream, and is close to both public transportation and the FSF headquarters itself. As in past years, we'll have ample space for an exhibit hall and free software workshops, as well as the ever popular "hallway track," where you can engage with other attendees in conversations on contributing to free software projects. On the Events Center Web site, you will find accommodation and transportation suggestions that will pair nicely with those we've put up on the LibrePlanet 2020 site. The Back Bay Events Center is located at the corner of Berkeley and Stuart Street, and is close by the Back Bay stop of the Orange Line MBTA train and the Arlington stop of the Green Line MBTA train.

  • LibrePlanet 2020 needs you: Volunteer today!

    The LibrePlanet 2020 conference is coming very soon, on March 14 and 15 at the Back Bay Events Center in Boston, and WE NEED YOU to make the world's premier gathering of free software enthusiasts a success. Volunteers are needed for several different tasks at LibrePlanet, from an audio/visual crew to point cameras and adjust microphones, to room monitors to introduce speakers, to a set-up and clean-up crew to make our conference appear and disappear at the Event Center, and more! You can volunteer for as much or as little time as you like, whether you choose to help out for an hour or two, or the entirety of both days. Either way, we'll provide you with a VERY handsome LibrePlanet 2020 shirt in your size, in addition to free admission to the entire conference and lunch and our eternal gratitude.