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Reviews

Accessible-Coconut - Ubuntu-based Linux Distribution for Visually Impaired Users

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Linux
Reviews

We take a look at "Accessible-Coconut" - a friendly Linux for Visually Impaired Users. We covered the features, utilities, download details, and a brief review of this distro.
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Framework DIY Modular Laptop is Available for Pre-Order at $999

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Linux
News
Reviews

The team announced the opening of pre-order channels for this innovative and disruptive Framework DIY Laptop. Starting Price is $999.
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CyberOS - A New QT Based Arch Linux Distribution that Looks Like Deepin DE

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Linux
Reviews

So, I stumbled upon a fairly new Linux distribution called CyberOS based on GNOME + Arch Linux. And I thought to do a test drive. Here's how it is.
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MX Linux Package Installer review - Nice but can be nicer

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Linux
Reviews

MX Package Installer is not a bad idea. But it's a workaround to the horrible mess that's Linux packaging. If anything, it just makes the problem more prominent, and puts it into the user's hands really. And, when we integrate over the problem space, the fault ends up at the MX doorsteps, because it's an MX Linux component that created the possibility for the user to try a program, all hopeful, and then to have it crash.

Ideally, every software component would have a clearly defined, rigorous test procedure. Every system would have a chain of these tests, declared, defined, interlinked. No application would be allowed for inclusion or publication without successful testing that proves the components work great on their own and as part of the overall complex system. The responsibility can be shared, if needed, whatever works the best. But to rely on third parties for your own success means gaps and problems and issues and tons of blameshifting. It's Debian, no it's MX, no it's KDE, no it's the user, and so on. Who cares? The Linux desktop isn't growing. Well, I do. I want it to grow.

So this would be the conclusion of this review. MXPI is a nice thing, but it's still 90% nerdy, 10% friendly, and the equation needs to be flipped. Over the years, the MX team has done pretty cool stuff, and I believe and hope they will be able to polish up MXPI. After all, they did it with their distro, and really transformed it from a nerdbox into a cool, accessible system. But the journey is far from over.

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Review: JingOS 0.8 and Tribblix

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Reviews

One of the most recent additions to the DistroWatch database is JingOS, an Ubuntu-based Linux distribution for tablet computers. The project aims to run both GNU/Linux and Android applications via a graphical user interface which is designed to work in a familiar way on touch screens. While early versions of JingOS were developed for ARM-based devices, JingOS 0.8 is the project's first version to run on x86 processors.

The JingOS project requires that people register their e-mail address to obtain the project's free download. A download link is then sent to our e-mail address. When I downloaded an earlier version of JingOS (version 0.6) the download link was for the distribution's ISO file directly. When I downloaded version 0.8 I was given a link to the project's torrent file. At first my torrent download only had two seeders with an average download speed of 20kB/s. This eventually rose to eight seeders at 400kB/s, which is unusually slow compared to most free mirrors available these days. The ISO file's total size is 2.4GB so the download took over two hours.

Booting from the distribution's install media causes the system to start with a self-check of the media. This check can be skipped by pressing Ctrl+C. The screen then goes entirely black for a while. After a few minutes I started testing keyboard input without any response. The only thing I could do was to switch between terminals using the Ctrl+Alt+Function keys.

I found the first terminal remained blank, the second terminal showed a colourful background and a clock displaying UTC time. Terminals three through six all displayed a console login prompt. The login prompts identify the distribution as KDE neon's Unstable Edition.

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Fedora 34 Review - Impressive Performance and Stability with Cutting-Edge Linux

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Linux
Reviews

It has been some time I am using Fedora 34 and I believe it's time for a Fedora 34 review. Here I put down my experience with Fedora 34 overall in its workstation edition.
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Zorin OS Review – An alternative to macOS and Windows

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OS
Reviews

Zorin OS is an Ubuntu-based Linux distro. Its ultimate goal is to provide Windows and macOS users with a Linux alternative. The Zorin OS is powerful, fast, and secure; it is pretty hard for trackers to track activities in your OS. Most users love Zorin due to its privacy prowess.

Why Zorin OS? This question has been asked by most users, thus, the essence of this tutorial. We are here to give you the ideal review of why you should opt for the Zorin OS.

This Linux distribution is user-friendly, and hence it does not matter if you are a Linux guru or not. Anyone can use this OS since it is very manageable. The handy preset layouts that are offered with this OS are a good touch. Newcomers can easily try out the macOS layout, Touch Layout, and Windows Layout now by installing Zorin OS and feel homely.

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Review: Ubuntu 21.04

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Like clockwork, every April sees the release of a new version of Ubuntu and all the official variants. This release of Ubuntu, Hirsute Hippo, is noteworthy for its decision to not include the new desktop layout featured in GNOME 40. Instead, Ubuntu 21.04 continues to use version 3.38 of GNOME Shell. This means the desktop experience remains much the same as it has been in recent Ubuntu releases.

[...]

Ubuntu 21.04 is a very solid release. Users of new releases of other GNOME-based distributions might be experiencing the new GNOME 40 interface, but Ubuntu 21.04's GNOME 3.38 desktop environment is functional and familiar. I do look forward to seeing how Ubuntu might tweak GNOME Shell 40 (or whatever the current post-40 GNOME version is at the time) in the future, but can find no fault with the decision to stick with 3.38 for now. The few issues I had with release are so minor they are barely worth repeating, but it would have been nice to see some non-hippo wallpapers.

Overall, I would recommend Ubuntu 21.04 to anyone who is okay with the short 9 month support window. If you are already a user of non-LTS Ubuntu releases, the upgrade from 20.10 to 21.04 is something you should feel comfortable doing as soon as possible. The new features, while not massive, are very nice quality of life improvements. Distro hoppers might be slightly more interested in distributions that feature GNOME 40, but I would still recommend they at least try out Ubuntu 21.04 to see what it has to offer.

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First Look at Solus GNOME with the GNOME 40 Desktop

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Reviews

Despite the fact that it was released more than a month ago, GNOME 40 is, currently, like a unicorn; we’ve heard about it and everyone talks about it, but we haven’t actually been able to see it much in action, as only a few distributions are offering it in their repositories or pre-installed.

For now, as far as I know, if you want to use GNOME 40 as your daily driver, you have to either install Arch Linux, which isn’t something newcomers will be able to drop into, openSUSE Tumbleweed, which is a lot easier to install, or the recently released Fedora Linux 34.

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HP EliteDesk 800 G2 Mini Desktop PC – Hardware Acceleration in Firefox – Week 4

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Linux
Hardware
Reviews

This is a weekly blog looking at the HP EliteDesk 800 G2 Mini Desktop PC running Linux.

This week’s blog looks at configuring the HP EliteDesk 800 G2 to use hardware acceleration when watching videos in Firefox. Hardware video acceleration lets the GPU decode/encode video, offloading the CPU and saving power. Linux distributions, by default, don’t enable hardware acceleration because it can cause issues on specific hardware.

This machine was made available by Bargain Hardware. Bargain Hardware retails refurbished servers, workstations, PCs, and laptops to consumers and businesses worldwide. All systems are completely customisable on their website along with a vast offering of clean-pulled, tested components and enterprise replacement parts. They supply machines with a choice of Linux distros: Ubuntu, Debian, and Fedora.

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This week in NeoChat

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StarLabs StarLite is an Attractive 11-inch Linux Laptop

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Manual Installation of GNOME Extension from ZIP File [Easy Steps]

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