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Munich's U-turn, Fedora 27 on Halloween, Back to Linux

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In the story that wouldn't die, Munich's Linux reversal in in the news again as the city's administrative committee recommended moving to a uniform Windows-based deployment throughout city government by 2020. Elsewhere, Fedora 27 is scheduled for release on October 31, 2017 and kde.org got a new look. Former Linux user Paul Cutler has returned to the fold and Blogger Dedoimedo compared Fedora's Xorg to Wayland.

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Kodi Illegal, Open Source Now a Word

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Seems the top story today was the arrest of five individuals for selling devices loaded up with Open Source Kodi. Apparently the kits came with add-ons that allowed users to stream pirated content. In other news, Merriam-Webster has added the word "Open Source" to its database of official words, along with 1000 others. Jonathan Terrasi described his Linux awakening and blogger Dedoimedo said the GNOME version of openSUSE 42.2 is better than Plasma, but it still doesn't redeem the mediocre release.

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Best Distros, openSUSE Whoops, Debian 9 One Step Closer

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In the latest Linux news, the news.opensuse.org got hacked and displayed "KurDish HaCk3rS WaS Here" for a while Monday and while the site has been restored, no comment on the hack has been issued. Elsewhere, Debian 9.0 has entered its final freeze in the last steps in preparations for release. FOSS Force has named their winner for top distro of 2016 and Swapnil Bhartiya shared his picks for the best for 2017. Blogger DarkDuck said MX-16 Xfce is "very close to the ideal" and Alwan Rosyidi found Solus OS is giving Elementary OS a run for its money. Phoronix.com's Michael Larabel explained why he uses Fedora and Jeremy Garcia announced the winners of the 2016 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards.

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Bodhi Needs Testers, Build Your Own PC

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Jeff Hoogland today posted that time has come to polish up Swami and asked for his bravest users to install the newest to give it a go. Tails is the latest distribution to deprecate their 32-bit architecture and GIMP 2.8.20 was released. Liam Tung reported on a new self-assembled laptop able to run Linux and Rick Broida suggested some light-weight distros for such cases. Just in case you actually take that route, Jamie McKane shared some tips for first time computer assemblers.

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Best Distros for Mac Users and Everyone Else

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Derrik Diener today said that a lot of Mac users jumped ship recently and he has some Linux suggestions for them. Adam Shepherd shared his list of best distributions for desktop users, enterprise servers, and security buffs. Most of his picks are very familiar. Elsewhere, GIMPer Alexandre Prokoudine blogged of the 2.10 blockers and Mozilla has pulled the plug on Firefox OS. In case you missed it, LibreOffice 5.3 was announced yesterday with the most features ever in a single release and Carla Schroder posted a quick down and dirty tutorial to becoming an Arch user.

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Also: GIMP 2.10 Coming, GIMP May Re-Target To GTK4 Rather Than GTK3

GIMP 2.10 blockers and the road to 3.0

KDE Plasma 5.9 Released, 5.10 Previewed; Steam Machines RIP

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Jonathan Riddell announced for the KDE team the arrival of Plasma 5.9, the next big update to the desktop family. This release brings some new features such as Global Menus and a new network configuration module. And if that wasn't enough KDE for you, Eike Hein blogged of some of the goodies being cooked up for 5.10. The Register reported on a bug in Cryptkeeper that triggered its removal from Debian, other distros are waiting for upstream fixes. Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols said Linux is the right choice for those who appreciate a modicum of privacy and Mairin Duffy said today to come join in the Fedora IRC chats.

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Top Ubuntu Mistakes, F26 Wallpaper Hunt, Linux GOTY

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It's that time of development again when the Fedora Design Team sends out their call for supplemental wallpapers. Artists and photographers are encouraged to participate. Matt Hartley discussed today some of the mistakes new users make with Ubuntu and offered up his best advice for avoiding them. TecMint compiled the top five reasons to install Linux and the second round of voting has begun in FOSS Force's Best Distro of 2016 contest. Some familiar names graced Google's Code-in winners and Gaming On Linux has identified the best games of 2016 through a user polling survey.

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Mint 18.1 KDE & Xfce, Bodhi 4.1.0, ftp.kernel.org RIP

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Clement Lefebvre announced the releases of Linux Mint 18.1 KDE and Xfce following earlier releases of MATE and Cinnamon versions. Mint 18.1 is a long term supported release meaning it will get security updates until 2021. Jeff Hoogland announced an update to Bodhi Linux 4.0.0, dubbed 4.1.0. This release brings all the security and bug updates since the 4.0.0 release as well as a new dark theme for the native Moksha desktop. The Fridge announced 17.04 Alpha 2 as the community wallpaper drive got underway and a new KDE laptop has surfaced.

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Also:

  • Linux Mint 18.1 KDE and Xfce released

    The Linux Mint team has just released the long term support release Linux Mint 18.1 as a KDE and Xfce edition to the public.

    The new version of Linux Mint brings software updates and refinements mostly. First, some information on Linux Mint 18.1 being a long term support release.

    The Mint team will support Linux Mint 18.1 with security updates until 2021. Future versions of Linux Mint will use the same base package as Linux Mint 18.1 until 2018. This ensures that it is easy to update to new versions.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE released!
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” Xfce released!

Best Distro, systemd Exploit, KDE neon Scare

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The Linux world keeps on turning and while I've been under the weather a KDE neon download scare rocked users recently as well as a newly discovered exploit in systemd. The exploit is said to "open the door to privilege escalation attacks, creating a means for hackers to root systems." Elsewhere, FOSS Force is running their annual Readers' Choice Awards Poll for the best Linux desktop distribution for the year ended a few weeks ago. Firefox 51.0 was released with a new logo and Arch is deprecating the 32-bit architecture images. Jamie Watson test several more distros on his new notebook and Jesse Smith reviewed GoboLinux saying, "I applaud the developers' efforts in making something unusual and interesting."

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2017 Desktops, neon Goes Calamares, Spices Changes

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Desktop choice is a hallmark of Linux and Jack Wallen today predicted which will become more popular in 2017. His list may surprise you. In other news, Jonathan Riddell said today that KDE neon would be switching installer from its current Ubiquity to another gaining in popularity. It's currently in the developer version, but it'll soon make its way into the user recommended version. Linux Mint founder Clement Lefebvre today announced changes to the Cinnamon desktop applets. He said he was concerned about security of 3rd party contributions given last year's security breach. Elsewhere, Robin Miller defended his Ubuntu choice saying, "So call me mass-average. Call me boring. Call me one of the many, the humble, the Ubuntu users!"

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More in Tux Machines

IBM/Red Hat: Mainframes History, Fwupd 1.5 Released, and Lots of Stuff Outsourced to Microsoft (GitHub)

  • The First Mainframe Computer: Harvard Mark I

    The mainframe computer, or ‘big iron’ in the computer industry, is the longest-running computer system in history. This technology has been substantially useful since the World War II era. In fact, the first mainframe computer was used mainly by the US Navy during the war. Like supercomputers, the mainframe computer addressed the need for an automatic, large-scale calculator as a more efficient and error-free way of computing. It was the invention of such machines that redefined the term ‘computer’ to refer to devices that can carry out automatic calculations of mathematical operations, a term that used to refer to humans who performed the manual calculations of such operations. Today, the importance of this technology in large-scale transaction processing remains unparalleled. Large industries in both the public and private sectors, from government and banking to aviation and healthcare, are in constant need of faster large-scale mainframes with higher stability and reliability. Consequently, big irons continue to evolve, as they remain at the core of every IT infrastructure. Inspired by Babbage Howard Aiken was a graduate student at Harvard when he came up with the concept of a device that can automatically calculate differential equations, after encountering difficulties in solving mathematical physics problems in his research. He envisioned a machine that could take in loads of mathematical inputs and produce precise and reliable results in a short time. After coming up with an initial design, he approached some manufacturers, but none were interested. Unabashed, Aiken explored other technological advances to improve his design. He eventually came upon Henry Babbage’s demonstration of his father’s Analytical Engine at Harvard, performed 70 years prior. Noticing the similarities between his design and that of Charles Babbage’s, Aiken studied Babbage’s work on the Analytical Engine and used his principles in the development of a new conceptual design. Aiken finished the design in 1937 and obtained the support of the Harvard faculty, who were impressed by his efforts. He presented his design to several manufacturers. Aiken eventually gained the nod from IBM in 1939 after Thomas Watson, then chairman of IBM, saw it as good publicity for the company and as an opportunity to showcase the company’s talents.

  • New fwupd 1.5.0 release – Technical Blog of Richard Hughes

    Today we tagged the 1.5.0 release of fwupd. Quite a bit has changed since the last release and I figured a blog post probably made sense to explain things. From a firmware engineer point of view, the most useful is the ability to build composite images, for instance building a firmware.dfuse file from different A.dfu and B.dfu images. At the moment there are commands in fwupdtool to convert one file format to another, but not to merge or alter them. Many firmware files are really just containers which can store multiple images, each with optional id, index and addresses. This new fwupd feature also allows us to create very small complicated container binaries for fuzzing.

  • Fwupd 1.5 Released With Expanded Hardware Support, New Capabilities

    Version 1.5 of the Fwupd utility is available for updating various component firmware/BIOS natively on Linux and integrating with the Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS) for the easy distribution of said firmware images. [...] Some of the hardware plug-in additions were motivated by Lenovo's increased support for Linux on their systems, which is great to see continuing.

  • Red Hat Publishes Open Source Participation Guidelines

    Red Hat’s Brian Proffitt says the guidelines “reflect the values and culture of Red Hat in the most appropriate way possible: a collaboration of many associates working toward a common goal, documenting how Red Hat is committed to contributing to any free and open source project in the most collaborative ways possible.”

  • Linux in the enterprise as seen from IBM

    It’s hard to imagine now, but 20 years ago, enterprise support and use of Linux was a controversial choice. Executives had trouble seeing the value of investing resources in an unproven, open-source operating system when mainstream options achieved the same results with less perceived risk. With the benefit of hindsight, so many enterprise clouds are run on Kubernetes containers with Linux that the initial concerns seem silly. The changes gave developers the capabilities to produce more agile, robust and innovative work than ever before. The success of the modern Linux cloud is due partly to IBM’s decision to support Linux on its mainframes 20 years ago. We spoke to Javier Perez, open-source program leader at IBM, about why and how IBM made this decision and what trends he thinks are going to influence the next 20 years for developers.

  • Open Source AI and Data: Keep up with rapid advances with LF AI and Data – IBM Developer

    The Linux Foundation Artificial Intelligence Foundation (LF AI) is merging with ODPi, which has a focus on big data in the enterprise, including governance, business intelligence, and data science education. The merged foundation will be called LF AI and Data. IBM believes this move is great for the AI and data open source space and that the new LF AI and Data Foundation will pave the way for stronger, safer open source AI and data projects. Why is this important? The world’s technology increasingly runs on open source software and data. Open source AI software development has led to advances in AI pattern recognition, including image recognition, speech recognition, and entity extraction in text, that were only possible because researchers were able to use open data sets and open source software to benchmark and compare systems and approaches. The data you or your organization create influences and is influenced by AI. Increasingly, both productivity and quality of service depends on data-driven AI systems across business and society. And those AI systems are largely based on open source software and data sets at their core.

  • How IT consultants can build trust with clients

    As a consultant, I’ve learned that consulting requires forming a customer relationship built upon trust. The client and the consultant usually establish trust through shared experiences. The most common shared experience is working through contract delivery. However, only focusing on contract delivery may cause the clients or clients to miss additional opportunities. I’ve laid out some low-cost or free opportunities for building trust below. These are not just for one party or the other to initiate! If you are the client, I encourage you to engage your consultants to find mutual interests. Likewise, if you’re the consultant, look for ways to add value for your customer by sharing your expertise.

  • The Red Hat Accelerators Wear Many Fedoras

    With Red Hat Accelerators, there’s a strong community feel with benefits for practitioners to expand their expertise, offer a voice to influence offerings and a seat at the table during industry events. Check out a few examples of how Red Hat Accelerators have been involved since the program’s inception. [...] Red Hat Accelerators have the opportunity to join briefings and other sessions, hearing from and sharing with teams from across the company, including engineers, marketing, product managers, executives and more. These in-depth discussions and forums have included opportunities to engage with Red Hatters like Chris Wright (senior vice president and CTO), Stefanie Chiras (senior vice president and general manager of Red Hat Enterprise Linux), and Paul Cormier (Red Hat’s president and CEO). Forming deeper relationships with customers means engaging Red Hatters from every direction, so customers in the Accelerators program can pick their brains and access candid, unfiltered information on any topic, big or small (or hybrid).

Latest Security Patches and Reproducible Builds

  • Security updates for Monday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (fastd, freetype, openjdk-11, phpmyadmin, and thunderbird), Fedora (ant, firefox, freetype, kde-partitionmanager, kpmcore, mupdf, python-PyMuPDF, singularity, suricata, and zathura-pdf-mupdf), Mageia (claws-mail, nss, firefox, pdns-recursor, and thunderbird), openSUSE (atftp, chromium, firefox, freetype2, gnutls, hunspell, kleopatra, and opera), Oracle (firefox, java-11-openjdk, and kernel), Red Hat (firefox and kpatch-patch), SUSE (bluez, firefox, glibc, libcdio, rmt-server, and SDL), and Ubuntu (freetype, pam-python, and perl).

  • Reproducible Builds: Second Reproducible Builds IRC meeting

    Please join us on the #reproducible-builds channel on irc.oftc.net — an agenda is available. As mentioned in our previous meeting announcement, due to the unprecedented events in 2020, there will be no in-person Reproducible Builds event this year, but we plan to run these IRC meetings every fortnight.

Exploring Vim: The 18 Best Vim Books To Improve Your Vim Fu

Vim is only content or text editing tool. That is it. In case you’re accustomed to utilizing Sublime Text for Windows/Mac, Notepad for Windows, Nano for Linux, Atom for Windows/Mac, or any content tool, Vim is simply one more program that permits you to compose and alter the text. Contrasted with other word processors, 2 viewpoints make Vim stick out are proficiency and universality. Vim is all about productivity. What’s more, there are two or three points from which it approaches productivity. Vim permits you to be proficient by driving you to utilize the console, and indeed, that implies no more using the mouse! Therefore, a perfect set of Vim books is undecipherably crucial to learn Vim. Universality is likewise a pretty cool part of Vim, which is that it’s all over. It’s accessible on essentially every significant stage you can consider. Regardless of whether you’re utilizing a Mac, Windows, or some Linux conveyance, Vim has you secured. Specifically, if your everyday work includes working in the terminal meetings, Vim is your lone content manager accessible. Read more Also: Zeit - A GUI Front-end To Crontab To Schedule Jobs In Linux - OSTechNix

Joplin and webdav

Joplin is a cross-platform note taking app that I use a lot to keep track of my projects, and to organize my notes and thoughts. Joplin allows you to create note books, and add an infinite number of notes to them. You can link between notes, link to external sources, add images, tables, etc. Everythin in markdown, very easy to learn and use. It’s basically an Evernote clone, without the subscription, and without one other thing that I’ll talk about later. Read more